Fountain pen users, rejoice!

Discussion in 'Picture Gallery' started by sk1wbw, Jan 20, 2016.

  1. sk1wbw Suspended

    sk1wbw

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    #1
    So it seems there are a few fountain pen users here. Post your pics of what you have and what you dream of.

    Here's a few of mine:

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    --- Post Merged, Jan 20, 2016 ---
    Here's two pens that I really want. The red one is a completely hand made and tooled Nakaya cigar model. It's probably around $600. The silver one is a Conid Kingsize for probably a few hundred more.

    CONID_SLIMLINE_01_959.jpg p1007663641.jpg
     
  2. Scepticalscribe, Jan 21, 2016
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2016

    Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #2
    Terrific idea for a thread, and thanks for sharing your collection. Agree re the dark claret red Japanese pen - that is is a very attractive pen.

    Well, as I have been writing with fountain pens since I was a teenager and rarely write with anything else, I have quite a few fountain pens. And they are used.

    Unfortunately, as my camera still runs on film, and my phone is an antique Nokia, the world of digital photography is entirely beyond me.

    Might I ask that if individuals do post pictures that they actually describe what has been shown, and perhaps add something along the lines of when and where they bought it, or got it?

    As a teenager - and later - I must say that I never liked Parker pens, I thought them too large and heavy and uncomfortable and unbalanced in my hand. Thus, I never really cared much for them.

    My preference at school for quite a few years were the small Papermate fountain pens; at school, I also was given a few that my father had, he had a few nice Cross pens, but he mostly used Shaeffer fountain pens, and I these are what I used at university, inheriting (or begging from him) the ones that either he didn't wish to use any longer, or that I really liked, or that he handed over to me as he wished to buy a new one for himself.

    Later still, when working as a teacher - and travelling - I picked up a beautiful Waterman, in Heathrow airport, which looked gorgeous - even my former Professors admired it - but wasn't terribly comfortable to write with for any length of time.

    Over a decade ago, I bought a Caran d'Ache stainless steel fountain pen and found it extremely good, sturdy, and reliable, but yet heavy.

    For the past few years I have been writing with Mont Blancs.

    Initially, had I disdained them, thinking the brand a triumph of hype and style over substance. I disliked some of their massive pens - thinking them a monument to macho, plutocratic self-indulgence.

    Ironically, it was a rather battered Mont Blanc roller ball pen that I inherited that changed my mind - the thing wrote so beautifully, and was ergonomically so well designed, it fitted my hand and wrote without the slightest strain that I found myself compelled to take a look at the brand as I love fountain pens.

    Since then - the best part of five years ago - I have been writing with Mont Blancs.

    My personal preference is the Mont Blanc 144, a black, classic Meisterstuck. This is a superb pen. It is light, and perfect for someone with small hands. I used it - and use it - daily for note-taking, and preparing briefings - in fact, I used it so much on one foreign posting that the black resin casing cracked and had to be replaced. This pen is my favourite - ever.

    The ergonomics are superlative, for it is perfectly balanced in my hand, glides along the page, and neither tires nor strains my wrist. Physically, I can write with this thing all day long, It does - perfectly - exactly what it was designed to do. Moreover, the ink never leaks - some of my other pens (even some of the expensive ones) suffered from this design flaw, and the Mont Blanc nib never stutters, or blobs, or feathers, offering no ink one minute and a gush of ink which blots the next.

    The problem is that Mont Blanc have discontinued the 144. I have a 145, and a 146, but both - frankly - while lovely pens are actually just that little bit too large for my hand to be entirely comfortable when held, especially if I wish, or need, to be able to write for a considerable period of time.

    So, I ordered another 144 - my specialist pen shop managed to cannibalise one for me, which leaves me with two working Mont Blanc black-resined case Meisterstuck 144s. In London last year, in the exquisite Penfriend shop, in Piccadilly, I also acquired a sterling silver version of my Mont Blanc 144, which writes every bit as well as its black resined siblings, but, for obvious reasons, travels abroad a lot less often.
     
  3. GerritV macrumors 65816

    GerritV

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    #3
    Always been a Lamy fan myself - I have a 2000 and a Persona.
     
  4. Mousse macrumors 68000

    Mousse

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    #4
    I was given a Pelikan (not sure which model) years ago. It was beautiful to behold (the body was black with gold trim and the tip was silver and gold) and a pleasure to use.:cool: Sadly, my handwriting could never do it justice. After the original ink cartridges ran dry, I used it as a display item for a short time.

    Now it's probably at the bottom of a box in the attic.:oops:
     
  5. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #5
    In my experience, in general, fountain pens actually help to improve handwriting.
     
  6. Borin macrumors regular

    Borin

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    #6
    I'm still a few centuries behind. Cheap and nothing pretty, but they do the trick.

    [​IMG]
     
  7. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #7
    Ah, but how well do they write?
     
  8. Mousse macrumors 68000

    Mousse

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    #8
    Yes, it does. I remember having to write slower, make my marks more deliberate.

    It like shooting slide film with a manual camera. You have to be more deliberate, take time to compose. The results, if the photographer has sufficient skills, is photo of exemplary quality. I lack the skill level to shoot full manual and slide film. I lack the handwriting skills to do justice to even the most basic fountain pen.
     
  9. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #9
    Well, my hand writing used to be both execrable and illegible. The proverbial scrawl.

    The year before I took the university entrance exams, a teacher remarked to me that it was of little use knowing the course backwards if nobody - such as an examiner - could read what I wrote. That stung - in a way that other criticism of my handwriting hadn't - and compelled me to seek a means to render my hand writing more legible.

    Anyway, as a result, I started writing with fountain pens - leading to the eventual evolution of a hand that is clear, and legible.
     
  10. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #10
    Well, @sk1wbw - the 1930s Wahl is really lovely - how does it write? - while - thanks to you, I actually spent around twenty minutes late this afternoon visiting and drooling over some of the pens on the Nakaya site; fascinating site featuring some gorgeous pens (and of the two pens that you are dreaming of, this is the one that I, personally, would purchase).
     
  11. Ulenspiegel macrumors 68030

    Ulenspiegel

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    #11
    Thanks a lot for starting this thread!
    As Scepticalscribe I have been using fountain pens since 'forever'. My first fountain pen was a Pelikan (still have it) at school. A year later I received my first Montblanc. At the University used Montblancs and later till the end my favorite Parker Falcon. Since the '90s I mainly write with Montblanc Meisterstücks with some detours to Cross and Japanese masterpieces (mainly Sailor and Platinum).
     
  12. sk1wbw thread starter Suspended

    sk1wbw

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    #12
    Well, for being an older pen, it really does write like it's brand new. That flex nib is beautiful but writing with a flex nib takes a lot of getting used to and a lot of practice. And yes, the Nakaya line is gorgeous. I love the cigar version without the clip. Stunning.
     
  13. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #13
    Agreed, and nice to come across a fellow aficionado of the brand, who has experienced what fountain pens have to offer.

    Re Mont Blanc, I have come to the conclusion that it is a bit like Mercedes - there is a reason these are so highly regarded.

    In decades of using fountain pens, - a great variety of brands - I have simply never come across any that write so consistently comfortably and reliably and sit so ergonomically and easily in your hand, as the Mont Blanc. For a long time, I had thought this just macho posturing - and I still dislike some of the massive, macho, bling bling Mont Blancs, but the elegant Meisterstuck classic - which is what all of my ones are - is a design classic, beautiful, elegant and functional.

    Actually, I use them everyday - for everything. Notes of phone calls, minutes at meetings, briefings, presentations I am supposed to give, shopping lists ….One of them is always in a jacket or coat pocket when I go out.
     
  14. sdilley14 macrumors 65816

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    #14
    Sorry if this is a dumb question, but what is the point of using a fountain pen as opposed to a regular pen?
     
  15. Scepticalscribe, Jan 21, 2016
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2016

    Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #15
    "The point"? Does there have to be a point?

    Why not ask "why do you prefer to use a fountain pen instead of an ordinary pen"?

    I prefer it. It feels better in my hand - ballpoint pens feel horrible to use, and - while I can tolerate rollerballs, I still prefer fountain pens.

    Fountain pens are physically nicer to write with than are regular pens. Is a Ferrari nicer than a - name me some anonymous America brand of motor-car manufacturer, please? Perhaps a Ford?

    If you are using a well-made fountain pen that balances beautifully in your hand it is a physical pleasure to write with - as opposed to something that varies between Hard Work and Torture when you use it to write with. And an aching wrist. The ink flows beautifully, and it makes your writing look more elegant, classy - and - readable.

    Besides, when you write with a well-made and ergonomically balanced fountain pen you want to write with this thing, (at least I do), and the ink glides across the page - somehow it makes the physical act of writing - one of the greatest achievements of humanity - ever - an act of transcendental pleasure and delight.

    Therefore, when writing with a fountain pen, you have the luxury of thinking that every word may matter. Fountain pens allow you to think that the written word matters, - and it does - and that merely writing with them allows for the creation of crafted prose, rather than churned out…..dross.
     
  16. dingster1 macrumors regular

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    #16
    Too much talk... More pics! As for me I ashamedly use Varsity Disposables... That red Japanese one is HOT though!
     
  17. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #17
    These tools - often beautifully crafted - are for writing with. It should come as small surprise that those who collect, and use fountain pens also like to wield them and are comfortable with the written word as a medium of expression.
     
  18. sdilley14 macrumors 65816

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    #18
    I didn't mean to strike a chord with the phrasing of my question. I've simply never seen or heard of anyone actually using fountain pens. I've never used one myself and I've never known a single person that has used one. So when I see a thread dedicated to fountain pen enthusiasts, I get curious.

    Thanks for the insight!
     
  19. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #19
    Fair enough.

    And it is a perfectly reasonable question, as most people (almost all people) don't use fountain pens any longer, and the few that do might be seen as old-fashioned in some ways.

    I like beautifully crafted objects, and love to use them in my daily life.

    However, I see no absolutely no contradiction whatsoever in owning and in using daily - say, an Apple computer (which I do, for a series of strange reasons too complicated to go into at the moment, I have two MBAs, a 13" and an 11"), and a fountain pen (several fountain pens). Actually, in a bizarre way, they serve to complement one another.
     
  20. dyn macrumors 68030

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    #20
    Then get to know a lot of people digging fountain pens at one of the most well known pen forum: http://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/ They have some great articles about fountain pens.

    Unfortunately, you don't get to see many of those people outside the dedicated pen forums. Nice to see some more addicts here :)
     
  21. cdcastillo macrumors 6502a

    cdcastillo

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    #21
    I started with fountain pens back in my first couple of years of college (can not remember exactly if on my first or second year, since my pre grad education involves 7 years and was a long time ago. In this galaxy, though) when at the end of a class I found an abandoned parker fountain pen in the row of seats behind mine. I picked it up and the next class tried to find its original owner but none of my classmates knew to whom it belonged, so after a week of unfruithful searching it became mine for the rest of uni.

    Afterwards, even when I started my postgrad training, I always kept a cheap parker or lamy fountain pen on me. From this time I still keep an assortment of non-expensive parker/shaeffer/miscellaneousBrands fountain pens on my desk. I never saw the need to migrate to more expensive brands. Until I saw my holy grail, that is.

    During my time living on BCN, a few months before finishing my last postgraduate course, while waiting to board on the Prat de Llobregat, I saw a pen that stole my heart, a never opened, minted, new Edgar Allan Poe MontBlanc special edition fountain pen that had sat on the store for 5 years unsold (I've been an admirer of the master for a long time, a PoeHead since high school). It was on sale and my credit card had enough space to accommodate that expense. However, since I was coming to America for a few weeks, I didn’t want to be unprepared for an emergency, and told myself: "If nothing goes wrong on this trip, I'll buy it on my way back home". Alas, it was not to be. The flight back landed after midnight and the boutique was closed (it was on the after-security part of the airport). The next time I flew out of BCN 3 months later, the boutique was already closed for good (thats why there was a sale, they were going out of business).

    Upon returning to my natal country, my wife, after watching me suffering for the lost pen, gave to me a MB starwalker black metal fountain pen, which I treasure because of who gave it to me, and because it was my first "expensive" pen.

    Finally, last year I managed to track down a similar, albeit used and damaged, MB special edition EAP fountain Pen on eBay. Bought it and sent it to repair to Germany and now it is my favourite pen. I also have a Daniel Defoe special edition fountain pen that I couldn’t resist (it was beautiful and on sale).

    I like the heft of my pens, and since I mainly sign forms and write brief notes on clinical files, I do not suffer because of the weight.
     
  22. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #22
    Just stole a quick peek at the Edgar Allan Poe Mont Blanc - what a lovely looking pen.

    What size is it on the Mont Blanc scale, a 146, or 149?
    Terrific story and thanks for sharing it with us. Enjoy both of your beautiful pens. (As well as the Daniel Defoe Mont Blanc postscript pen..)
     
  23. Ulenspiegel, Jan 22, 2016
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2016

    Ulenspiegel macrumors 68030

    Ulenspiegel

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    #23
    The feeling. And style.
    (Lately, over the past few years, it became a kind of "fashion" to write with fountain pens, when occupying certain positions in certain places).

    @Scepticalscribe: I feel the same about the brand. I loved its style, the natural flow and all of the little design nuances of Montblanc since childhood. And I remained loyal or at least always came back.
     
  24. fanta88 macrumors 6502

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    #24
    The inkflow from a fountain pen is smooth, has character, and can't be duplicated any other type of pen, even the best rollerball. It is the perfect pen for folks who write cursively (though we seem to be a dying breed).

    Also, yes, fountain pens are often beautiful objects.
     
  25. dyn macrumors 68030

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    #25
    It is perfect for any kind of handwriting. It's just way more comfortable to write with due to far less drag than a ballpoint pen most people use. You don't have to press the pen to get the ink out, the capillary will do this automatically. The ink being more fluidic allows for a smoother experience (it's basically a lubricant). If you match it with proper paper the experience is even more enjoyable.

    I usually write a lot quicker with a fountain pen than a ballpoint pen because of the above.

    If you fancy some really lovely pens then look at some Italian brands like Montegrappa, Omas, Aurora, Delta and Visconti. Btw, Omas is known for their smooth writing nibs, those are absolutely awesome! And Omas is currently for sale so if you fancy an entire fountain pen company... :D
     

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