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FrenzyBanana

macrumors regular
Jan 20, 2008
114
2
Can you post sample shots of fuji vs iphone X with same subject?

Im curious if theres still difference between them in terms of image quality.

I have iphone x coming. My question is, ist still ideal to buy a camera? Im just basing sample shots on apples website and it look good. But i wanna see some side to side comparison.
 

Surf Monkey

macrumors 603
Oct 3, 2010
6,249
5,377
Portland, OR
Can you post sample shots of fuji vs iphone X with same subject?

Im curious if theres still difference between them in terms of image quality.

I have iphone x coming. My question is, ist still ideal to buy a camera? Im just basing sample shots on apples website and it look good. But i wanna see some side to side comparison.

iPhone X is incapable of ever being able to replace a dedicated camera like the Fuji X series in terms of image quality. It’s a simple matter of physics. Bigger lenses collecting more light and exposing a far larger sensor. There’s no trick to overcome the physical barriers of a camera the size of a pencil eraser versus one the size of a chalk board eraser.
 

nagual

macrumors member
Apr 4, 2012
47
12
I used to have a fuji x800 I believe and still to these days pictures I took with this camera wow me, what other people say in a way is magical. On the other hand, the convenience and simplicity of iPhone is undeniable, I mean the way we distribute and collect pictures. That is the first reason majority of people using cellphones as their only camera. Digital camera companies if they want to survive they have to address this issue.
 

Kulfon

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Nov 4, 2013
869
1,299
Pro photographers will need to have pro tools, not really something that will post directly on instagram. Most consumers will use smartphones, agree!

I used to have a fuji x800 I believe and still to these days pictures I took with this camera wow me, what other people say in a way is magical. On the other hand, the convenience and simplicity of iPhone is undeniable, I mean the way we distribute and collect pictures. That is the first reason majority of people using cellphones as their only camera. Digital camera companies if they want to survive they have to address this issue.
 
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OreoCookie

macrumors 68030
Apr 14, 2001
2,727
90
Sendai, Japan
Pro photographers will need to have pro tools, not really something that will post directly on instagram.
That's not a convincing argument: I would love if my serious cameras would allow me to automatically upload photos to my photo libraries. But only recently are WLAN modules included by default and the software on cameras is akin to what we had on phones before smartphones were released. There are no regular updates, no camera platforms so that improvements roll out over a whole camera line-up instead of on a model-by-model basis. Even built-in GPS is rare. In 2017. When all cheap smartphones have all of this for a fraction of the price.

To see that non-professional cameras do better in this regard and equate that to “lack of professionalism” or a stone age UI on cameras with “professionalism” is backwards. The traditional photo companies are in danger of being uprooted from below as the amateur market shrinks and eventually from above when one of these companies figures out how to make proper software. I would like to live in a world where Nikon, Canon and Fuji have ISPs and software that rival those of Apple and Samsung.
 

themumu

macrumors 6502a
Feb 13, 2011
727
644
Sunnyvale
Pro photographers will need to have pro tools, not really something that will post directly on instagram. Most consumers will use smartphones, agree!

I don't have the numbers, but based on the fact that all camera manufacturers keep making "beginners" and "amateur" cameras - smaller, simpler, but with pro features like interchangeable lenses and fast autofocus - I would say they have interests beyond just the pro photographers.

I am in the process of dumping my trusty D7000 with 18-200 mm lens in favor of D5600 with 18-55 mm kit lens (or maybe 10-20mm) because I have realized that lately I've been dreading taking it anywhere fun. It's bulky, heavy and ends up getting stuck in the bag (or worse, at home). The D5600, although not without flaws, is 1/3 of the size of my previous kit.

So the question is, why is the wifi feature on it so atrocious? I tried Fuji's offerings as well, and honestly can't tell which one sucks more. I could not quite put a name to it at first, but OreoCookie is right, it's like using the old "feature" phones.

I realize that the better images are likely going to get onto a computer with a full blown editor for processing, but there is tremendous value in being able to take casual snapshots with really good IQ and post them right away to your favorite sharing sites. A few times I had fun encounters with strangers while traveling and it was amazing to be able to just AirDrop the group shots we just took while being stuck in the middle of a national park with no reception.
 

OreoCookie

macrumors 68030
Apr 14, 2001
2,727
90
Sendai, Japan
I realize that the better images are likely going to get onto a computer with a full blown editor for processing, but there is tremendous value in being able to take casual snapshots with really good IQ and post them right away to your favorite sharing sites. A few times I had fun encounters with strangers while traveling and it was amazing to be able to just AirDrop the group shots we just took while being stuck in the middle of a national park with no reception.
Exactly, and it goes way beyond that. Camera makers still seem to think of the chips inside the camera as the late-20th century for the mechanics instead of realizing that it is a computer that should in fact be a networked computer. Just imagine if Adobe could make apps for serious cameras. Imagine an app that helps stitch together photos for panoramas, perhaps in conjunction with a computer later. You rotate the camera, and it shows the overlap between the two photos and gives you advice on how to optimize it. I can think of time lapse apps, apps for medical purposes where images are directly transferred to the dentists patient files. The latter isn’t fiction, my dentist here in Japan has it, but he has to use a point-and-shoot with a macro flash attachment. All of these are professional use cases. Or you could install an app that allows you activate modes that go beyond the PASM paradigm, perhaps with a smarter auto ISO functionality where the minimum shutter speed depends on the focal length that you use (gasp!).

Cameras still feel like typewriters. And for some things this is great, there is something to be said for nostalgia. But nostalgia alone does not push the envelope.
 

OreoCookie

macrumors 68030
Apr 14, 2001
2,727
90
Sendai, Japan
The D5600 has this. I think the Nikons have had this for a few years already (and others probably too).
My D7000’s auto ISO only has a global setting independently of the focal length of the lens. Perhaps the newer Nikons are smarter. On my X100s this isn’t an issue as, well, I only have a single focal length to choose from.
 

Kulfon

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Nov 4, 2013
869
1,299
Specifically in photography, the result is what matters to me. I took this pictures with 5D MKIII. When you are able to do it woth a phone, I will for sure not carry all this gear with me.
See examples: www.dylikowski.com



I don't have the numbers, but based on the fact that all camera manufacturers keep making "beginners" and "amateur" cameras - smaller, simpler, but with pro features like interchangeable lenses and fast autofocus - I would say they have interests beyond just the pro photographers.

I am in the process of dumping my trusty D7000 with 18-200 mm lens in favor of D5600 with 18-55 mm kit lens (or maybe 10-20mm) because I have realized that lately I've been dreading taking it anywhere fun. It's bulky, heavy and ends up getting stuck in the bag (or worse, at home). The D5600, although not without flaws, is 1/3 of the size of my previous kit.

So the question is, why is the wifi feature on it so atrocious? I tried Fuji's offerings as well, and honestly can't tell which one sucks more. I could not quite put a name to it at first, but OreoCookie is right, it's like using the old "feature" phones.

I realize that the better images are likely going to get onto a computer with a full blown editor for processing, but there is tremendous value in being able to take casual snapshots with really good IQ and post them right away to your favorite sharing sites. A few times I had fun encounters with strangers while traveling and it was amazing to be able to just AirDrop the group shots we just took while being stuck in the middle of a national park with no reception.
 

TheDrift-

macrumors 6502a
Mar 8, 2010
879
1,400
Exactly, and it goes way beyond that. Camera makers still seem to think of the chips inside the camera as the late-20th century for the mechanics instead of realizing that it is a computer that should in fact be a networked computer. Just imagine if Adobe could make apps for serious cameras. Imagine an app that helps stitch together photos for panoramas, perhaps in conjunction with a computer later. You rotate the camera, and it shows the overlap between the two photos and gives you advice on how to optimize it. I can think of time lapse apps, apps for medical purposes where images are directly transferred to the dentists patient files. The latter isn’t fiction, my dentist here in Japan has it, but he has to use a point-and-shoot with a macro flash attachment. All of these are professional use cases. Or you could install an app that allows you activate modes that go beyond the PASM paradigm, perhaps with a smarter auto ISO functionality where the minimum shutter speed depends on the focal length that you use (gasp!).

Cameras still feel like typewriters. And for some things this is great, there is something to be said for nostalgia. But nostalgia alone does not push the envelope.

There is of course the other school of thought that says give me a view finder, manual controls for shutter speed, iso and aperture and nothing else.

Seems like you have to spend increasing more to get less these days.
 

OreoCookie

macrumors 68030
Apr 14, 2001
2,727
90
Sendai, Japan
There is of course the other school of thought that says give me a view finder, manual controls for shutter speed, iso and aperture and nothing else.
I don’t see those two paradigms as being mutually exclusive: I love my Fuji’s manual and simple controls. But I’d also like modern connectivity. As long as it is additive, I don’t mind.
 
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