future-proof??????

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by jkcerda, Dec 22, 2013.

  1. jkcerda macrumors 6502

    jkcerda

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2013
    Location:
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    #1
    been trying to read & learn la ot here, I keep seeing "future-proof."in some threads as well as "haswell processor" , VM's and "bootcamp".

    obviously I have little to no idea what all of this means, trying to keep a purchase as secret to my son http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=1686924
    at the same time , pretty wary of buying something that is not upgradable or getting stuck with the wrong mac.

    use (that I know off )
    Adobe full suite
    X-code
    Blender 3-D
    Maya


    settled on 2 macs.

    1.) Refurbished 15.4-inch MacBook Pro 2.4GHz Quad-core Intel i7 with Retina Display
    Originally released February 2013
    15.4-inch (diagonal) Retina display; 2880-by-1800 resolution at 220 pixels per inch
    8GB of 1600MHz DDR3L SDRAM
    256GB Flash Storage
    720p FaceTime HD Camera
    NVIDIA GeForce GT 650M with 1GB of GDDR5 memory

    $1659 or so

    2.) 13" MBP (non-retina) 2.9GHz Dual-core Intel Core i7, Turbo Boost up to 3.6GHz
    8GB 1600MHz DDR3 SDRAM — 2x4GB
    128GB Solid State Drive
    $1400 or so.
    *****

    #1 seems like the better choice, drawbacks are only 8 GBS, can't upgrade at all, pros are Quad core AND 1 GB video card.

    #2 is a dual core, but it IS up-gradable up to 32 GB (if they ever release that, I heard I can get 16 GBs mem for it)

    seems SOME of the threads who talk about "future proof" mention 16 GBs on all of them, , should I be worried at all? or just spring for #1?


    EDIT, THANKS for the help AND the patience.
     
  2. KimJonNumberUn macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2013
    #2
    its kinda obvious that the 15" for only a couple hundred more is nicer.

    but theirs no such thing as future proofing. things will always get replaced and be better around the corner.
     
  3. jkcerda, Dec 22, 2013
    Last edited: Dec 22, 2013

    jkcerda thread starter macrumors 6502

    jkcerda

    Joined:
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    #3
    Found this one

    Refurbished 15.4-inch MacBook Pro 2.3GHz Quad-core Intel i7
    Originally released June 2012
    15.4-inch (diagonal) LED-backlit glossy widescreen display, 1440-by-900 resolution

    4GB (2 x 2GB) of 1600MHz DDR3 SDRAM
    500GB Serial ATA @ 5400 rpm
    8x double-layer SuperDrive (DVD±R DL/DVD±RW/CD-RW)
    NVIDIA GeForce GT 650M with 512MB of GDDR5 memory


    I can upgrade the memory and move to a SSD later

    EDIT. Just got off the phone with apple support, guy mentioned that you CAN upgrade the memory on the retina models
     
  4. KimJonNumberUn macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2013
    #4
    i have a retina and upgraded form a 15", far superior computer
     
  5. priitv8 macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2011
    Location:
    Estonia
    #5
    Yes, but only at the time of configuring your order. Not later.
    PS why leave the upgrades to later, when you can do them now and just use your laptop for years to come?
    The hardest bullet to bite with retinas is the comparatively high price of SSD storage. But once you've bitten that, there's no way back to working on a HDD computer.
    There's also no way back from retina either, btw. Both will spoil your perception of a "good computer".
     
  6. thekev macrumors 604

    thekev

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2010
    #6
    This is incorrect in practice. The reason is that you're unlikely to ever see 16GB sodimms in the correct specification. Note that there are notebook machines available today that can take 32GB in a 4 x 8GB configuration. You don't have that with the mbp. It will go to 16GB. It's highly unlikely that this model will ever take 32GB.
     
  7. jkcerda thread starter macrumors 6502

    jkcerda

    Joined:
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    #7
    Money. The 8 GB mem & 256 SSD retina model is $1669
    The 16 GB & 512SSD is $2169
    Been watching videos on YouTube, memory is soldered into the board , no way to upgrade before purchase
     
  8. drought, Dec 22, 2013
    Last edited: Dec 22, 2013

    drought macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2013
    #8
    don't get #2. i saw in your other thread that this is for your student programmer son. a 1280 x 800 screen SUCKS for programming (he probably won't have his external monitor everywhere). imo, you are focusing way too much on upgradability. 8gb RAM will suffice for his needs given your budget.

    having such a crappy resolution will be a permanent inconvenience that will fundamentally and negatively affect the way he uses the computer for his needs that you lined out.

    on the other hand, with 8gb RAM the worst case scenario is that SOMETIMES things will not be as fast as they could be.

    #1 has the added bonus of the video card, which if your son uses blender/maya will benefit him more than luxury RAM. refurb from apple is generally a great value too, it will arrive like new.
     
  9. leman macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2008
    #9
    Get option 1. Its good price and 8GB is absolutely sufficient for the majority of users.
     
  10. priitv8, Dec 23, 2013
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2013

    priitv8 macrumors 68020

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    Estonia
    #10
    Still, Adobe full suite, Maya and Blender 3D are not what majority of users run on their computers.
    One thing to consider: Mavericks is more efficient in managing memory, so the memory pressure is lower than on previous versions of OS X. 8GB will look like having 10-12GB on Mountain Lion.
     
  11. jkcerda thread starter macrumors 6502

    jkcerda

    Joined:
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    #11
    that is good to hear, going to wait a week or 2, hope a 16GB model pops up
    like this one

    MacBook Pro 15.4” Retina - Quad-Core i7 2.4Ghz
    Originally released February 2013
    15.4-inch (diagonal) Retina display; 2880-by-1800 resolution at 220 pixels per inch
    16GB of 1600MHz DDR3L SDRAM
    256GB Flash Storage
    720p FaceTime HD Camera
    NVIDIA GeForce GT 650M with 1GB of GDDR5 memory

    price keeps climbing up.:mad:
     
  12. AirThis macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2012
    #12
    15" is better for Blender

    It's difficult to speak about future-proof, but I'll gladly explain why 15" is better for Blender since I use it with some regularity on an rmbp.

    The main thing to know about Blender is that it will use up any free CPU that you have whilst rendering. The new Cycles renderer is progressive, and you can turn it on at any moment to see what your model looks like. So it's a very useful tool that's used frequently. Now, the faster your machine is, the quicker you will get an idea of what your model looks like. And the faster you "see" what your model looks like, the faster you will free up your CPU for other tasks.

    To show that Blender will consume practically all your CPU resources whilst rendering, I've first run a Flash movie and then a Blender render. In the exhibit below (Activity Monitor), we can see the Flash movie on the left side of the CPU history (8 black and green bars), and the Blender render on the right side of that same history chart. As you can see, the Flash movie leaves some overhead for other tasks (black area), whereas the Cycles render uses 2 hyper-threads per core on all 4 cores continually (green area on the right). That's why you see 8 solid green bars in the CPU history and probably also why the CPU column indicates 760%.

    So now, of course, you can run Blender on the 13", but the bigger your project gets, the harder it becomes to work on the lesser hardware. As the size of your project grows, the simple fact of rotating your model 180 degrees in the viewport (without rendering it) will consume resources and even tend to make your computer laggy (regardless of whether it's an rmbp or not). Therefore the more horsepower you have, the better. I've only used Maya for very small projects, but I suspect that it's probably the same as Blender as far as computational resources go.

    Well, that was my sales pitch for the 15 inch. Hope this helps you with your decision. :)
     

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  13. jkcerda thread starter macrumors 6502

    jkcerda

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2013
    Location:
    Criminal Mexi Midget
    #13
    thank you, 15" it is, hoping a 15" with a 16GB of mem comes up in the refurbished area.
    this is what caught me eye ..

    MacBook Pro 15.4” Retina - Quad-Core i7 2.4Ghz
    Originally released February 2013
    15.4-inch (diagonal) Retina display; 2880-by-1800 resolution at 220 pixels per inch
    16GB of 1600MHz DDR3L SDRAM
    256GB Flash Storage
    720p FaceTime HD Camera
    NVIDIA GeForce GT 650M with 1GB of GDDR5 memory

    @ 1829 , hefty price (for my walllet) but like a lot of things, cry once instead of crying a lot later. no way I can stretch my wallet more than that :eek:
     
  14. thekev macrumors 604

    thekev

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2010
    #14

    Will your son be using it solely at home or does he need to take it to school? I prefer something bigger than a notebook if I have to review a lot of code, and I'm not that old. As for Blender, if he plans to eventually incorporate the use of 3d apps in his career in any way, I suggest registering for a student version of maya. It's really quirky, but it's somewhat ubiquitous in certain industries.
     
  15. jkcerda thread starter macrumors 6502

    jkcerda

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    #15
    No, school then home.

    Is there a big difference between the 2012 & the 2013 models?
    The 2013 flew out the store

    Does anyone know if the video card can be swapped? I would love a 2-3 GB video card
     
  16. saturnotaku macrumors 68000

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    Mar 4, 2013
    #16
    It cannot.
     
  17. leman macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2008
    #17
    No, it can't

    What for?
     
  18. jkcerda thread starter macrumors 6502

    jkcerda

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    #18
  19. saturnotaku macrumors 68000

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    Mar 4, 2013
    #19
    Then you should consider a proper Windows-based workstation (Dell Precision, HP Elitebook, Lenovo W530).

    As far as early 2013 Macs versus 2012, the only difference is the former have slightly faster processors. They are otherwise identical.
     
  20. jkcerda thread starter macrumors 6502

    jkcerda

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    #20
    considered it, a sweet toshiba with a 32GBs of mem , I7 Processors & 3 GB video card is $1799, but son will also be learning X-code.
     
  21. leman, Dec 24, 2013
    Last edited: Dec 24, 2013

    leman macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2008
    #21
    I doubt there is any noticeable difference between a modern integrated GPU and a 650M/750M for modelling work like you would usually do with Blender. And the amount of video RAM is rather irrelevant in this context.

    And by the way: bigger is not always better. At some point, it just does not matter. It won't be worse, surely, but it also won't be better. So why waste money/energy for something which you won't use? ;)
     

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