Futureproof?

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by thegrandmaster, May 23, 2007.

  1. thegrandmaster macrumors regular

    thegrandmaster

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    #1
    I'm wondering just how 'futureproof' you guys reckon the MBP is.

    After the SR upgrade and whatever that brings, would such a computer still be useable in say 4 or 5 years time?

    It obviously wouldn't be at the forefront of technology as it is now, but would it still be suitable for most tasks like surfing the web or video and pictures?

    I'm thinking about getting a MBP and the main motivation for that is the larger screen, better specs and particularly dedicated graphics compared to the MBs; but looking at the prices, I could by a mid range MB now and buy another one again in 4 years and not spend much more than 1 MBP now.

    I'm just looking for your thoughts on how the MBP will stand up in the coming years, I'm buying now hoping that it will get me at least part way (hopefully the whole way!) through university.

    Thanks
     
  2. CalBoy macrumors 604

    CalBoy

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    #2
    I don't know about Norway (I'm guessing that's where you are because of "Valhalla") but in the US, universities say that a MBP is good enough for 4 years of college use. In addition, given that Apple keeps older technology in mind, I doubt you'll have a problem running your MBP for four years.
     
  3. deadpixels macrumors 6502a

    deadpixels

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    #3
    i'm on a 2.16 MBPro now, my last was a 1.25 alubook and i had it for 3 years (worked just fine), my brother use it now and he is not complaining :D i think you'll be fine.
     
  4. polevault139 macrumors 6502

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    #4
    No computer is completely future proof. I still use an iMac G3 and it does everything I ask it to do. The computer will keep on doing what it can when you bought it. I don't try and run Final Cut Pro on my G3 for a reason, it cant handle it. So your computer will be good for a long time but just dont expect to keep running the latest software in the next 5 years.
     
  5. jdechko macrumors 68040

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    #5
    With technology, the question of futureproof isn't necessarily a valid one. However, if you are asking whether or not a MBP would last through 4-5 years of university, then most likely it will (although at that mark, it will probably start to show it's age). As a general rule of thumb for computers (ie: non-hardcore gaming or don't have to have the latest version of every piece of software you use) a machine will last between 4-5 years. For primarily email/web/word, 7+ years would still yield acceptable performance.
     
  6. lil' brudder macrumors 6502

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    #6
    You know, that is pretty much exactly what i was gonna say. I have the iMac DV 500mhz G3 and it still hasn't been totally abandoned by apple and still works great for web browsing, email and the like. (and its 7!)
     
  7. thegrandmaster thread starter macrumors regular

    thegrandmaster

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    #7
    I'm on a whole year exchange next year, 2 years of 6th Form after thatm and then 3 or 4 years of uni after that.

    6 or 7 years, seems like a long time to me, but there isn't going to be anything drastically new that I'm gonna be wanting to do with in that time, I guess its also possible to add functionality through external stuff.

    I just had a little panic there about how long its going to last me, then I remembered that the computer I'm using now has been here 2 years now and doesn't not do anything I throw at it, and I can't see anything rendering it useless any time soon.

    Is the rate of change faster or slower in the computer world faster or slower now than it was in the days of the 300mhz iMacs?
    Is there going to be anything revolutionary that is on the horizon, except the never ending addition of more cores to processors?

    Thanks for all the help!
     
  8. flopticalcube macrumors G4

    flopticalcube

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    #8
    Let's look at the near future to judge. It is claimed that Leopard won't support the G3. The last G3 Mac was the iBook sold until October 2003. That means that, at worst, the G3 iBook was completely supported by Apple for 4 years. Now anyone using an iBook can of course continue using Tiger for as long as they wish, but it will start to become outdated at this point. So you will probably have 4 full years (at least) of complete support before it STARTS to become unsupported.
     
  9. thegrandmaster thread starter macrumors regular

    thegrandmaster

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    #9
    Yeah, that all makes a lot of sense. Thanks!
     
  10. warfa macrumors regular

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    #10
    I am also gonna get the new MBP'S when they come out. I am a college student on my second year and I don't do any video or graphics but I would like to get into that! I wanna buy the high end 15.4 inch model because of that futureproof stuff and because I saved for a while for it. I don't need all that power stuff at the moment but I will need it in the future. I will definately get the 17" though IF it gets LED!! But if not, the 15.4 it is :D
     
  11. Jack Flash macrumors 65816

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    May 8, 2007
    #11
    Look at what the computer can do now, and estimate what your future needs might be. If the MacBook Pro can handle what you need now and what you think you'll need it for in a few years, then go for it.

    And just because the computer is expensive,doesn't mean it has to be a 5 year purchase; you can sell it in a year or two to help defray the cost of upgrading if you need to do so.
     
  12. iBunny macrumors 65816

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    #12
    As long as you take care of it, it will be good for along time. I personally dont like to have the same computer for more than 2 years, because I feel that it is getting outdated; however, it will still run everything fine.

    I myself plan on buying a MBP when they are updated, and plan on keeping it around for approx 3 years, give or take.
     
  13. Luigi239 macrumors 6502a

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    #13
    Considering that people are still using old 5 year old iBooks running Tiger on them, I would say that although your not going to get the same performance in 5 years, it should still hold up pretty well.
     
  14. thegrandmaster thread starter macrumors regular

    thegrandmaster

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    #14
    I'd like to be able to buy a new computer every 2 years as well, but its not realy an option.

    I'm sure its gonna be able to keep up with what I want it to do in the future, since uni is gonna be a lot of internet surfing and making documents, it should definitely be able to handle that fine. I can use it for all my gaming and hardcore graphics needs now, and just as it needs to be used for less difficult tasks, it'll be ready. Excellent :D

    God, I can't believe I'm giving a laptop I don't own a death sentence already!!
     
  15. x Shadow Dragon macrumors regular

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    #15
    im using a PC right now *shutter* (getting a mac soon) anway its from 2000 and it still runs fine.. theres nothign wrong with it it can use most apps and stuff but its not very good its just good enough, 7 years and its still fine

    getting a MB soon!!!!
     
  16. thegrandmaster thread starter macrumors regular

    thegrandmaster

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    #16
    Thanks for the input man!

    I was in the Manchester Apple Store today, the MBs look so cool, enjoy it when you get it! :D
     
  17. thejadedmonkey macrumors 604

    thejadedmonkey

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    #17
    I replaced my 3 or 4 year old computer because it broke, not because it was obsolete. Yeah everyone's talking about the "latest and greatest", but the computer you get now will get slower, so as long as you know how to keep the software you use optimized, it'll work until it falls apart.
     
  18. CalBoy macrumors 604

    CalBoy

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    #18
    Do you mean that the processor or the OS will slow down? How do you keep your software optimized? Tips would be great.
     
  19. x Shadow Dragon macrumors regular

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    #19
    o i will

    anyway i think he means or at least what i think, that the programs will keep getting more advanced for ur computer and start lagging it up, or it will get to cluttered

    but seriously i doubt theres any computer that is "futureproof"
     
  20. CalBoy macrumors 604

    CalBoy

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    #20
    Except for tomorrow's...and the one after that...and the one after that...
     
  21. sushi Moderator emeritus

    sushi

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    #21
    I have a PM933 which I purchased in 2002.

    I have a PB15 which I purchased in 2003.

    Both still work fine for me.

    Are they future proof, whatever that means? No. But they can still do what I expected them to do when I purchased them.

    Hardware wise, I have been fortunate with my Macs to have them last a long time and still keep working. Some are over 10 years old. They still do what I expected them to do when I purchased them. Of course they cannot run the latest OS and Apps. But that does not matter since they still run fine with what they had back then.

    I hope this makes sense.
     
  22. thegrandmaster thread starter macrumors regular

    thegrandmaster

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    #22
    Yeah sushi, that makes a lot of sense, thanks for the help! :D

    I know no computer is futureproof, and that if you keep holding off for the next thing, you'll never buy anything.

    I'll still be buying a SR MBP when they come (hopefully WWDC) and loving and cherishing it for many years to come! :p
     
  23. sushi Moderator emeritus

    sushi

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    #23
    Thanks! :)

    Here's a different twist to think about. I knew a fellow who's concept was to purchase a low end system each year and sell the old model once he transferred his files.

    His concept was that the low end system 2-3 years from now would be better than a high end system today. So this way he could stay closer to the technology curve over time while spending less money overall.

    Since he sold his old systems while they were fairly new, about a year old, he could get a decent price for them. So his trade up cost was much less than the cost of a new system.

    I would think this concept would work with the MB or iMac.
     
  24. thegrandmaster thread starter macrumors regular

    thegrandmaster

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    #24
    I've heard that Macs retain quite a lot of their value, so that is a good idea that I may well use myself in a few years time!

    Just as an example if you were to sell a last gen Powerbook now, how much could you expect to get for it? Or is their like a rough percentage of how much of the original value you'd lose when you seel it on?
     
  25. sushi Moderator emeritus

    sushi

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    #25
    Probably eBay would be a good place to start.

    I think that the key is to sell around the 1 year point. After 2 years, most computers are considered old and outdated. So I doubt I would ever try to sell a computer that is over 2 years old -- unless I just wanted to get rid of it.. Also, if you sell at the 2 year point, there is 1 year left on a 3 year Apple Care plan which is good for the buyer, and helps keep the price up.
     

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