G-Drive not recognized

Discussion in 'Mac Accessories' started by puckhead193, Jan 19, 2013.

  1. puckhead193 macrumors G3

    puckhead193

    Joined:
    May 25, 2004
    Location:
    NY
    #1
    I got a new G-Drive, plugged it in and it won't mount. I get a message saying that the "The Disk you inserted was not readable by this computer". It should be formatted for OS X, and not windows. what should I do? Is it dead?
     

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  2. simsaladimbamba

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    #2
    What does Disk Utility have to say about that drive?
     
  3. puckhead193 thread starter macrumors G3

    puckhead193

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    #3
    this:
     

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  4. simsaladimbamba

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    #4
    It shows "Master Boot Record" as partition map scheme, which is meant for NTFS and FAT32 and exFAT formatted volumes for Windows.

    What happens if you select disk1s1 and click REPAIR DISK?
     
  5. puckhead193 thread starter macrumors G3

    puckhead193

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    #5
    saying that I only have 500 GB. And I can't click repair disk. :confused:
     

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  6. Mr. Retrofire, Jan 19, 2013
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2013

    Mr. Retrofire macrumors 601

    Mr. Retrofire

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    #6
    If this is a new disk, it is probably formatted for Windows (NTFS). I recommend the solution in this thread:
    https://discussions.apple.com/thread/1532469

    The “write zeroes” step makes sure that the HDD drive firmware recognizes defective blocks on the HDD.

    And make sure, that the G-drive has the newest firmware.
     
  7. Weaselboy Moderator

    Weaselboy

    Staff Member

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    #7
    Click initialize then format the disk to Mac OS Extended.
     
  8. simsaladimbamba

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    #8
    Stupid me, stupid me, stupid me.

    Yes, format the HDD accordingly. To drunk now, even after one sip of water. Sorry.

    Did no see the word "new" in the original post, but I also wonder, why a new drive is not recognised, as even NTFS and MBR formatted and partitioned HDDs can be viewed in Mac OS X.
     
  9. puckhead193 thread starter macrumors G3

    puckhead193

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    #9
    I don't care about the data, there is no data, its a brand new drive straight from box..
     
  10. simsaladimbamba

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    #10
    Yes, I did not see that, as you can see from the quote of my post in your post. I blanked out the word "new". Just format it to your liking.


    ____________________________________________________________

    Overview of the four major file systems (called "Formats" in Mac OS X) used on Windows and Mac OS X, compiled by GGJstudios. You can use Disk Utility to format any HDD to your liking.

    Any external hard drive will work with PCs or Macs, as long as the connectors are there (Firewire, USB, etc.) It doesn't matter how the drive is formatted out of the box, since you can re-format any way you like. Formatting can be done with the Mac OS X Disk Utility, found in the /Applications/Utilities folder. Here are your formatting options:

    HFS+ (Hierarchical File System, a.k.a. Mac OS Extended (Journaled) Don't use case-sensitive)

    NTFS (Windows NT File System)
    • Read/Write NTFS from native Windows.
    • Read only NTFS from native Mac OS X
      [*]To Read/Write/Format NTFS from Mac OS X, here are some alternatives:
      • For Mac OS X 10.4 or later (32 or 64-bit), install Paragon (approx $20) (Best Choice for Lion)
      • For 32-bit Mac OS X, install NTFS-3G for Mac OS X (free) (does not work in 64-bit mode)
      • For 64-bit Snow Leopard, read this: MacFUSE for 64-bit Snow Leopard
      • Some have reported problems using Tuxera (approx $36).
      • Native NTFS support can be enabled in Snow Leopard and Lion, but is not advisable, due to instability.
    • AirPort Extreme (802.11n) and Time Capsule do not support NTFS
    • Maximum file size: 16 TB
    • Maximum volume size: 256TB
    • You can use this format if you routinely share a drive with multiple Windows systems.

    exFAT (FAT64)
    • Supported in Mac OS X only in 10.6.5 or later.
    • Not all Windows versions support exFAT. See disadvantages.
    • exFAT (Extended File Allocation Table)
    • AirPort Extreme (802.11n) and Time Capsule do not support exFAT
    • Maximum file size: 16 EiB
    • Maximum volume size: 64 ZiB
    • You can use this format if it is supported by all computers with which you intend to share the drive. See "disadvantages" for details.

    FAT32 (File Allocation Table)
    • Read/Write FAT32 from both native Windows and native Mac OS X.
      [*]Maximum file size: 4GB.
    • Maximum volume size: 2TB
    • You can use this format if you share the drive between Mac OS X and Windows computers and have no files larger than 4GB.
    ____________________________________________________________
     
  11. puckhead193 thread starter macrumors G3

    puckhead193

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    #11

    Do i click the 4TB HGST or the disk1s1 to reformat? :confused:
     
  12. Mr. Retrofire macrumors 601

    Mr. Retrofire

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    #12
    Read post #6 in this thread and the thread on apple.com!
     
  13. simsaladimbamba

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    #13
  14. puckhead193 thread starter macrumors G3

    puckhead193

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    #14
    its 2x 2TB drives i think. Its going to be a scratch disk for Final Cut Pro, should I send it back. I don't want it to fail.
     
  15. simsaladimbamba

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    Location:
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    #15
    No need to send it back, but if it is indeed a 2 x 2 TB drive, then there is some switch at the back putting it in RAID or JBOD, thus it appears only to be one disk.
    Maybe look into the manual of the drive, what options you have.

    I personally would use both drives as single drives and disable any RAID or JBOD, and either use Disk Utility to make a software RAID 1 to mirror the drives for backup redundancy or make two single 2 TB partitions, each usable by FCP.
     
  16. skipcooney macrumors newbie

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