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Western Digital's G-Technology brand today announced the release of a new ArmorLock encrypted NVMe SSD, which is a 2TB SSD that uses G-Tech's newly introduced ArmorLock Security Platform. ArmorLock is a data encryption platform designed with finance, government, healthcare, media, IT, and legal professions in mind, offering greater security than is available with standard SSDs.

gtecharmorlock.jpg

G-Technology's ArmorLock SSD relies on a smartphone or computer for locking and unlocking through the ArmorLock mobile and desktop apps. It remains locked until it is paired to an iPhone or a Mac and unlocked with the device's security mechanisms - Face ID, Touch ID, or a passcode.

G-Technology suggests that this system is ideal for SSDs that need to be shipped between different physical locations as it provides protection until the SSD is in the hands of the right person. Because this higher security technology is meant for professionals, the SSD is more expensive than a standard SSD, priced at $599 for 2TB of storage.

The ArmorLock SSD offers read/write speeds of up to 1000MB/s through its 10GB/s USB port, combining high speeds with easy to use encryption. It is IP67 water and dust resistant and it can survive drops of up to three meters. At the current time, the ArmorLock SSD is limited to iOS and macOS devices.

When locked, the ArmorLock SSD offers 256-bit AES-XTS hardware encryption along with tools to securely erase and reformat when needed. The last known location of the SSD can be tracked on a map, and it supports firmware updates for adding new features.

The G-Technology ArmorLock encrypted NVMe SSD can be purchased from the Western Digital Store starting today. It is available in a 2TB capacity only and it is priced at $599.

Article Link: G-Technology Releases NVMe SSD Protected With New ArmorLock Technology
 

MauiPa

macrumors 68040
Apr 18, 2018
3,249
4,784
I’m thinking that the lifespan of a SSD is probably longer than WD will keep these apps updated. So when they stop and an iOS or macOS update rolls out which breaks the app... *poof* goes access to your data.
Doubt that is true
[automerge]1599136103[/automerge]
Is there a back door so the gubmint can get in?
 

PickUrPoison

macrumors G3
Sep 12, 2017
8,131
10,720
Sunnyvale, CA
Is there a back door so the gubmint can get in?
Maybe, maybe not. I think it makes sense to consider the possibility. It could happen with or without their knowledge.

So, do you trust G-Tech? Are they smart enough to know if they’ve been compromised by a third party?

Like people, some companies are trustworthy and some aren’t.

Here’s my list (partial):

Amazon: No
Apple: Yes for now, but subject to change
Equifax: No
Facebook: No
Foxconn: No
Google: No
Tesla: No
 

4jasontv

Suspended
Jul 31, 2011
6,272
7,539
There is not a back door to this product. It's 256-BIT AES-XTS H/W encrypted. Government certification coming soon. We use crypto-keys to provide access.

Welcome new member! Did you help develop this, or do you work for WD?
 

Digital Skunk

macrumors G3
Dec 23, 2006
8,085
903
In my imagination
I’m thinking that the lifespan of a SSD is probably longer than WD will keep these apps updated. So when they stop and an iOS or macOS update rolls out which breaks the app... *poof* goes access to your data.

Given the current trends, the drive may last a year or two tops. It pains me a little that WD bought (Hitachi; who bought G-Tech) but I trust G-Tech will provide updates and consistency for the life of the drive/app.

Also, even the post production industry knows not to jump on every update that comes around immediately. If I were using this drive and app I'd hold off on updating OSes until I was sure they were compatible.

Or just use Cryptomator to encrypt your files without using an app that isn’t open sourced.

The Government doesn't use open sourced anything for encryption. Most companies might use an Open Source product but there's something to be said for buying a product that has that kind of security baked in.
 

ChromeAce

macrumors 6502
Jun 11, 2009
485
689
FileVault works just fine on SSDs and I’d trust Apple long before G-tech, which is small enough to be bought by Google at any minute. And putting a GPS chip in your SSD drives sounds like a real secure idea.... until the NSA shows up at your shack in the woods because you voted to defund them.
 

mannyvel

macrumors 65816
Mar 16, 2019
1,233
2,132
Hillsboro, OR
The last time I shipped a HIPAA drive I just shipped it with BitLocker drive encryption enabled. FileVault would work as well. And the files themselves were encrypted as well.

These drives seem to be "lawyer" drives ie: when something bad happens and a lawyer asks you on the stand "did you use an AES-encrypted secure hard drive" you can say "yes."

Of course, you can also say "we use the standard Apple/Microsoft filevault/bitlocker feature to encrypt the drive." But when you're an executive/managerial person these technical detail things can get confusing, so they'll just buy the "secure hard drive."
 

Marx55

macrumors 68000
Jan 1, 2005
1,867
719
Great, but bring larger capacities (4, 8 & 16 TB), also without encryption option and also SATA option (to keep it cool; no, you do not notice speed difference in real time with PCIe NVMe; hard to believe, but true!).
 
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Takeo Apple

macrumors member
Sep 3, 2020
82
79
I’m thinking that the lifespan of a SSD is probably longer than WD will keep these apps updated. So when they stop and an iOS or macOS update rolls out which breaks the app... *poof* goes access to your data.

You are ABSOLUTELY RIGHT. Why do I know? I own a LACIE Safe drive with fingerprint reader... and guess what, I cannot access it anymore because there is no software release that works with any Mac OS before 10.1 or so... bummer because there is data on it... Windows also does not work (I tried)... I will never buy something like this again.

I own a USB IronKey from Kensington and it also already does not support moving up some Mac OS versions so I have to the Windows app... stupid... Just don't buy this stuff and better encrypt the stick with a DMG and loooong password.
 

Rajani Isa

macrumors 65816
Jun 8, 2010
1,161
72
Rogue Valley, Oregon
Great, but bring larger capacities (4, 8 & 16 TB), also without encryption option and also SATA option (to keep it cool; no, you do not notice speed difference in real time with PCIe NVMe; hard to believe, but true!).
So what would be the point of this drive without the encryption?
 

dopeytree

macrumors regular
Jan 9, 2007
140
9
UK
Seeing this a lot people putting these NVMe SSDs in cases. They should be in thunderbolt3 cases otherwise your bottleneck is the usb3 cable. These drives can be capable of 4000mb/s read
 

robertcoogan

macrumors 6502a
Apr 5, 2008
800
1,171
Joshua Tree, California
I had a fingerprint-locking HD about 12 years ago. When the fingerprint sensor stopped working, my friend just cracked the case and disconnected the sensor from the HD, plugged it into an adapter, and was able to access the contents of the HD.

I'm assuming this is different? It sounds like it's hardware-based, like my HD.
 

btrach144

macrumors demi-god
Aug 28, 2015
2,482
5,883
Indiana
G-Tech has partnered with artist Vincent Laforet. Problem is, I bought $150 worth of lithographs from Vincent and he hasn’t sent them out. Tried emailing and calling with no replies.

I’m convinced he’s a con artist at this point. If G-Tech wants to work with con artists, I can’t buy their products. Seagate and LaCie for me I guess.
 
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Scheistl Weigle

macrumors newbie
Sep 3, 2020
1
0
Seeing this a lot people putting these NVMe SSDs in cases. They should be in thunderbolt3 cases otherwise your bottleneck is the usb3 cable. These drives can be capable of 4000mb/s read

4000 MB/s true, but would you want an external SSD with a FAN in it?
 

-DMN-

macrumors 6502
Jan 21, 2019
275
913
More Freedom than Yours
Maybe, maybe not. I think it makes sense to consider the possibility. It could happen with or without their knowledge.

So, do you trust G-Tech? Are they smart enough to know if they’ve been compromised by a third party?

Like people, some companies are trustworthy and some aren’t.

Here’s my list (partial):

Amazon: No
Apple: Yes for now, but subject to change
Equifax: No
Facebook: No
Foxconn: No
Google: No
Tesla: No

I agree with your list but I consider Tesla trustworthy unless you can prove otherwise.
 

sideshowuniqueuser

macrumors 68020
Mar 20, 2016
2,390
2,324
Maybe, maybe not. I think it makes sense to consider the possibility. It could happen with or without their knowledge.

So, do you trust G-Tech? Are they smart enough to know if they’ve been compromised by a third party?

Like people, some companies are trustworthy and some aren’t.

Here’s my list (partial):

Amazon: No
Apple: Yes for now, but subject to change
Equifax: No
Facebook: No
Foxconn: No
Google: No
Tesla: No
Here's a better list:
Anything encryption related that has the entire encryption software completely open source: Yes
Anything else: No

If you (or more to the point, other independent encryption experts) can't verify the code, and create the executable by then compiling it your/themselves, then you never know what it is really doing, and can thus never 100% trust it. End of story.

So no, sorry, Apple doesn't make the grade when it comes to your privacy. They may claim they do, and they might well be telling the truth, or they might be telling the truth but have made a big boo boo and don't even know it's broken, but without the software being open source, then who knows.
 
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chabig

macrumors G4
Sep 6, 2002
10,158
7,623
So what would be the point of this drive without the encryption?
Most likely data storage. :) Some people might like the case design, and anyone can encrypt their own files. Personally I'm more comfortable with FileVault than with software from any accessory maker.
 

z970

macrumors 68040
Jun 2, 2017
3,583
4,486
Maybe, maybe not. I think it makes sense to consider the possibility. It could happen with or without their knowledge.

So, do you trust G-Tech? Are they smart enough to know if they’ve been compromised by a third party?

Like people, some companies are trustworthy and some aren’t.

Here’s my list (partial):

Amazon: No
Apple: Yes for now, but subject to change
Equifax: No
Facebook: No
Foxconn: No
Google: No
Tesla: No

Apple joined PRISM in 2012 (likely integrating with iCloud), does not allow independent sources to analyze their software code (save for certain exceptions), and for 14 years straight have shipped computers containing the Intel Management Engine, which itself alone is the very antithesis to both user privacy and hardware security. They like to lie a lot and put up a facade to gain points with the public, but the reality is that they are not trustworthy at all.

If a multi-trillion dollar company that disproportionately charges exorbitant prices for average to sub-par components is comfortable with financially exploiting their customers with such disregard and deceit as that, then beside what their marketing team says, what makes you think they are truly concerned for your data as an individual?
 
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