Gaming on Retina Pro- keyboard heat?

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by TheMacBookPro, Jul 2, 2012.

  1. TheMacBookPro macrumors 68020

    TheMacBookPro

    Joined:
    May 9, 2008
    #1
    I've been doing a bit of gaming on my rMBP in Windows 7 and have noticed that the metal in between the keys is getting extremely hot. It feels like I'm getting burnt every time I accidentally touch the keyboard frame when pushing down a key.

    I don't actually get burnt of course, it's just a sharp sensation that feels like a burn which subsides very quickly. The palmrest etc are warm but not as hot as the keyboard frame gets though!

    I'll be doing a lot of my gaming using an external keyboard so this isn't a major issue for me, but I can see it being a bit of an issue for other people. I'm not sure of any free utility on Windows which can read temperatures off the GPU sensors, but FWIW iStat reports a temperature of 65 degrees Celsius on the GPU diode after rebooting the machine into OS X (enough time to cool it down a bit, since I am in a well air-conditioned room).

    Is anyone else noticing this or is it just me?
     
  2. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #2
    It's perfectly normal for your MBP to get hot under high loads. It won't harm anything. Your Mac is not overheating. The Intel processors used in Macs are designed to automatically shut down to prevent damage if they truly overheat. CPU Tjmax = 105C (221F), GPU Tjmax = 100C (212F) on i3, i5, i7 processors. (Source: Intel) If you're not already using it, iStat Pro will give you accurate readings of your temps and fan speeds, among other things.

    Unless there is a rare defect in a Mac, most temps are well within the normal operating range, considering the workload being put on it. Websites with Flash content, games and other multimedia apps will put higher demand on the CPU/GPU, generating more heat. This is normal. If you're constantly putting high demands on your system, such as gaming or other multimedia tasks, expect temps to rise and fans to spin up accordingly. It's just your Mac doing its job to maintain temps within the normal range.

    It is also quite normal for your Mac to become extremely hot to the touch during intensive operations. The aluminum body transfers heat more effectively than other materials used in computer casings, so you will feel the heat more. This doesn't indicate that it's overheating and will not harm the computer to be hot to the touch.

    Your fans are always on when your Mac is on, spinning at a minimum of 2000 rpm (for MBPs) or 1800 rpm (for MBAs, MBs and minis). iMacs have 3 fans with minimum speeds in the 800-1200 range. They will spin faster as needed to keep temps at a safe level. If they're spinning up without increased heat, try resetting the SMC. (PRAM/NVRAM has nothing to do with these issues, so resetting it will not help.)

    The intake and exhaust vents are in the back of the computer near the hinge on all Mac notebooks (except the new MBP with retina display, which has intake vents along the sides at the bottom). The iMac vent is a slot on the back near the top of the computer. Make sure the vents remain unblocked to allow your computer to perform at its best.

    Learn about the fans in your Mac
    Apple Portables: Operating temperature

    For Flash-related issues:
     
  3. TheMacBookPro thread starter macrumors 68020

    TheMacBookPro

    Joined:
    May 9, 2008
    #3
    Do you just have a whole bunch of pre-made posts designed specifically to answer FAQs and noobish questions? :p

    Don't worry, I'm not saying it's overheating. I'm more than familiar with the fact that computers get hot and I know it's not going to harm the computer since it'll shut down before it gets to a temperature where it could cause damage.

    My question is specifically focused on how hot the metal between the keys gets as I did not have this issue on my previous MacBooks Pros and Airs. Not even the bottom of the computer is getting as hot as the keyboard frame.
     
  4. leenak macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2011
    #4
    Games under Windows will get hot. It'd be nice if Windows had a better fan control like OSX but I can see why Apple optimizing OSX and doesn't worry too much about Windows.

    What has helped me is
    1) External mouse (good anyway)
    2) Autorun in games where you run around a lot
     
  5. TheMacBookPro thread starter macrumors 68020

    TheMacBookPro

    Joined:
    May 9, 2008
    #5
    I'm using an external Razer keyboard and mouse for gaming so as stated in the OP it doesn't matter too much to me, but I just wanted to see whether or not others were having any issues similar to this.
     
  6. leman macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2008
    #6
    I was going to ask him the same thing :)

    To your question: well, the rMBP has a new cooling system, maybe the heat is getting redirected in a bit different way. Although, my 2009 MBP does get very hot in the keyboard area.
     
  7. WardC macrumors 68030

    WardC

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2007
    Location:
    Fort Worth, TX
    #7
    Mine doesn't get very hot. I've played both Sudoku and Solitaire and it doesn't get hot at all. And I am a can be a pretty serious gamer, clicking very fast too.
     
  8. TheMacBookPro thread starter macrumors 68020

    TheMacBookPro

    Joined:
    May 9, 2008
    #8
    Air seems to be getting pushed out of the vents in front of the hinge and is flowing up towards the screen via the slanted hinge so I don't think that's the issue. Actually, the hinge where the air is flowing out right onto doesn't feel as hot as the keyboard frame, although that's plastic and not metal.

    Well, I see where the difference is.

    You're playing mouse based games so you're not touching the keyboard that much. If you touch the keyboard the next time you play an intensive session of Minesweeper, let me know if it feels hot :D
     
  9. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #9
    Yes, I find it far more helpful and efficient since I've answered the same questions hundreds or thousands of times over the years. There's only so many ways you can answer the same question.
    As heat radiates in all directions, particularly upwards (heat rises), and as aluminum is a good heat conductor, it's natural that the keyboard area gets hot. As my earlier post states:
     
  10. ericrwalker macrumors 68030

    ericrwalker

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2008
    Location:
    Albany, NY
    #10


    :rolleyes: Have you tried minesweeper?
     
  11. TheMacBookPro thread starter macrumors 68020

    TheMacBookPro

    Joined:
    May 9, 2008
    #11
    No wonder you're able to conjure up such detailed posts within a minute or two of a thread being posted :)

    Yes, but theoretically the Kepler graphics and IB processor should run less hot (and is combined with a better cooling system) than the previous generation Pros, yet it feels much hotter in the keyboard frame area than it did with my old unibody 15" Pros.
     
  12. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #12
    As it's a completely redesigned case, the aluminum casing may be thinner and closer to the heat source than previous models, which may also contribute to it heating up more. At any rate, I wouldn't worry about it, as it's quite normal.
     
  13. WardC macrumors 68030

    WardC

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2007
    Location:
    Fort Worth, TX
    #13
    By the way, what I said was meant kiddingly...I am aware if you do play "graphically intensive" games like Crysis, Call of Duty, World of Warcraft, Diablo 3....yes -- games like this could cause some serious heat issues on any Portable or laptop machine. It would take something like a Mac Pro to efficiently cool an intense session of gameplay on games such as these...The MacBook Pro simply does not have a huge heatsink and massive fans, and the touchable parts of the laptop CAN and WILL get very hot under extended play with graphically intensive games, no matter what.
     
  14. TheMacBookPro thread starter macrumors 68020

    TheMacBookPro

    Joined:
    May 9, 2008
    #14
    That's true, I was hoping the improved fan system and lower heat output of new internals would negate that though.


    Still, my original question was not 'is this normal', so my question still stands: is anyone else experiencing an unusually hot keyboard frame when under heavy load?

    Don't worry, nobody missed the joke ;)

    Just a bit strange how the bottom isn't getting anywhere near as hot, even though that was the part which got the hottest in my older MacBooks.
     
  15. MH01 macrumors G4

    MH01

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2008
    #15
    The drivers that control the fans are delivered by Apple for windows 7. Windows 7 is dependent on the apple drivers for the hardware.

    Generally Windows will give you a better gaming experience with better performance, as the nvidia drivers for windows are optimised for speed, while the OS X ones are for reliability.
     
  16. pandamonia macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2009
    #16
    This isnt new. My 2010 gets the same heat in the same spot. I expect that heat in the chassis is better than all that heat in the CPU/GPU core. The Alum Chassis is one big heat sink it conducts heat very well which is why the surface is hot
     
  17. Tombs macrumors regular

    Tombs

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2010
    Location:
    Sutton, Surrey England
    #17
    Mine does the same thing playing BF3, as already stated above I'm not alarmed though. It’s why Apple used Aluminium in the first place to dissipate the heat.
     
  18. zerotiu macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2012
    #18
    Just for comparison, my mbp early 08 can achieve 75 dg celc (also using air-con) by playing minecraft and opening chrome. I think 65c is far cooler
     
  19. TheMacBookPro thread starter macrumors 68020

    TheMacBookPro

    Joined:
    May 9, 2008
    #19
    I wasn't alarmed or anything like that. Just curious to see whether or not this is normal.

    As it seems to be indeed normal based on your feedback, that's all I needed to know.

    That's after a reboot from Windows into OS X though, which means it's likely to have cooled down a bit by then and is probably running at a higher temperature when actually gaming.

    Besides, my main concern was not about the temperature- my old Pro reached temperatures much higher than 70 or 80 Celsius- I just wanted to know if the hot keyboard frame was normal.
     

Share This Page