Garfield is an iPod user

Shamus

macrumors 6502a
Feb 26, 2006
651
0
Hehe, that is good. Too right Nermal, hes not as witty as he used to be, but at least its good to see hes staying on the cutting edge of technology. :)
 

Mitthrawnuruodo

Moderator emeritus
Mar 10, 2004
13,802
174
Bergen, Norway
Nermal said:
Garfield's nowhere near as funny now as it was back in the 80s, but that one made me laugh :)
I know the feeling... I think this was the first time I giggled from a Garfield (Pusur in Norwegian, a name I always though was better than the original) in more or less 20 years (man, I feel old).

This joke did seem rather familiar, though... didn't Garfield listen to bacon frying with a walkman in the mid-80s...? Or is my memory just acting up on me again...?
 

mac-er

macrumors 65816
Apr 9, 2003
1,454
0
Mitthrawnuruodo said:
This joke did seem rather familiar, though... didn't Garfield listen to bacon frying with a walkman in the mid-80s...? Or is my memory just acting up on me again...?
Now you've got me wanting to go to the bookstore to find that...because that does seem familiar.

If that is true...Jim Davis is finished. :p Ever heard of plagiarism, Jimmy-boy? (And, yes, you can plagiarize yourself).
 

0098386

Suspended
Jan 18, 2005
21,576
2,907
The was in the Mail on Sunday.

Newspaper comics have never made me laugh :) now the Beano... oh childhood. and Dilbert :D And some new 'office' one in either the Guardian or Live -always forget. very very silly.
 

Mitthrawnuruodo

Moderator emeritus
Mar 10, 2004
13,802
174
Bergen, Norway
mac-er said:
If that is true...Jim Davis is finished. :p
Jim Davis was finished, creatively, round and about 20 years ago... after that it's only been about the money... and I can totally understand that, as long as I don't have to read Garfield any more... ;)
 

mac-er

macrumors 65816
Apr 9, 2003
1,454
0
Mitthrawnuruodo said:
Jim Davis was finished, creatively, round and about 20 years ago... after that it's only been about the money... and I can totally understand that, as long as I don't have to read Garfield any more... ;)
'Tis is true. I just want the whole commercial thing to come crashing around him too. What a sell-out.

Let me guess....tomorrow Garfield will kill a spider or sleep-in or eat.

This is fairly interesting, however: http://www.truthandbeautybombs.com/bb/viewtopic.php?t=4997

And, Wikipedia has an interesting tidbit:
One storyline, which lasted a week from October 23, 1989 (possibly to coincide with Halloween, although the 31st actually fell the following week), is unique in that it is not humorous. It depicts Garfield awakening in a future in which the house is abandoned and he no longer exists. This is revealed to have been a dream of some kind, and ends with this narration: "An imagination is a powerful tool. It can tint memories of the past, shade perceptions of the present, or paint a future so vivid that it can entice...or terrify, all depending on how we conduct ourselves today." Alternatively, some theorize that the end of this storyline actually implies that the rest of the series, the more conventional strips, are all fantasies Garfield is playing out in his head to delude himself from realizing the dark turn his life has taken, as he slowly starves to death in an abandoned house. This is arguably supported by the text, as the narration reads "After years of taking life for granted, Garfield is shaken by a horrifying vision of the inevitable process called 'time'. He has only one weapon... Denial" right before Jon and Odie reappear. This emphasis on Denial, with the word given its own box in the panel it appears in, and being followed immediately by the earlier text on the power of the imagination, could support the theory. However, it could also be that denial is what Garfield needed to snap himself out of this dark vision.
This is hilarious:
f you look at very early [Garfield] you see that the original artist had just a modicum of talent. When the strip got syndicated and became “popular”, the sydicate had a real artist come along and help the original artist out. Sometimes out entirely.

In Garfield’s case, they had some art school grad grind out thousands and thousands of clip art scenes so that now Garfield’s art is produced by an intern at the Xerox machine. They just have to find the right drawing to go along with the uproarious wit and wisdom of hating Mondays and eating lasagne.
 

macEfan

macrumors 65816
Apr 7, 2005
1,210
7
haha, that was a good one... I agree, garfield used to be funnier when the comic strip was newer...
 

leftbanke7

macrumors 6502a
Feb 4, 2004
746
1
West Valley City, Utah
One storyline, which lasted a week from October 23, 1989 (possibly to coincide with Halloween, although the 31st actually fell the following week), is unique in that it is not humorous. It depicts Garfield awakening in a future in which the house is abandoned and he no longer exists. This is revealed to have been a dream of some kind, and ends with this narration: "An imagination is a powerful tool. It can tint memories of the past, shade perceptions of the present, or paint a future so vivid that it can entice...or terrify, all depending on how we conduct ourselves today." Alternatively, some theorize that the end of this storyline actually implies that the rest of the series, the more conventional strips, are all fantasies Garfield is playing out in his head to delude himself from realizing the dark turn his life has taken, as he slowly starves to death in an abandoned house. This is arguably supported by the text, as the narration reads "After years of taking life for granted, Garfield is shaken by a horrifying vision of the inevitable process called 'time'. He has only one weapon... Denial" right before Jon and Odie reappear. This emphasis on Denial, with the word given its own box in the panel it appears in, and being followed immediately by the earlier text on the power of the imagination, could support the theory. However, it could also be that denial is what Garfield needed to snap himself out of this dark vision.

Kind of like the final episode of Roseanne where you find out that the final 5-6 seasons were just a book Roseanne wrote after Dan died of a heart attack.
 

motulist

macrumors 601
Dec 2, 2003
4,065
334
. said:
One storyline, which lasted a week from October 23, 1989 (possibly to coincide with Halloween, although the 31st actually fell the following week), is unique in that it is not humorous. It depicts Garfield awakening in a future in which the house is abandoned and he no longer exists. This is revealed to have been a dream of some kind, and ends with this narration: "An imagination is a powerful tool. It can tint memories of the past, shade perceptions of the present, or paint a future so vivid that it can entice...or terrify, all depending on how we conduct ourselves today." Alternatively, some theorize that the end of this storyline actually implies that the rest of the series, the more conventional strips, are all fantasies Garfield is playing out in his head to delude himself from realizing the dark turn his life has taken, as he slowly starves to death in an abandoned house. This is arguably supported by the text, as the narration reads "After years of taking life for granted, Garfield is shaken by a horrifying vision of the inevitable process called 'time'. He has only one weapon... Denial" right before Jon and Odie reappear. This emphasis on Denial, with the word given its own box in the panel it appears in, and being followed immediately by the earlier text on the power of the imagination, could support the theory. However, it could also be that denial is what Garfield needed to snap himself out of this dark vision.
Geez, I don't even like Garfield and that's depressing to think about. It's a part of my childhood and it's sort of comforting to think that it's always the same, even if that makes it unfunny. It's kind of freaky to think that all this happy-happy-joy-joy stuff for the past couple of decades are really the hopeless delusions of a dead or dying house cat. Bleah.
 

sushi

Moderator emeritus
Jul 19, 2002
15,658
3
キャンプスワ&#
Until now, I never checked out the Garfield.com website.

I have been carrying a copy of the following cartoon around with me for a long time. Decided to try to find it on the web site. There it was under 1984. Still find it funny.
 

Attachments

cleanup

macrumors 68030
Jun 26, 2005
2,643
10
Toronto
I prefer Calvin and Hobbes. It was never a newspaper comic, but was just published in Watterson's collection books. It was all about the creativity. :) A full page, full colour comic every Sunday! I love Watterson's weird panel designs.