Georgia Man Pleads Guilty to Hacking Apple IDs of Professional Musicians and Athletes

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Kwamaine Jerell Ford, a Georgia hacker who was caught breaching the Apple accounts of professional musicians and athletes, today pled guilty to accessing those accounts and stealing credit card information from his victims.

According to the U.S. Attorney's Office for the Northern District of Virginia (via The Verge), Ford targeted high-profile athletes and musicians and tricked the victims into providing their Apple account passwords.
"The high profile victims in this case are an example that no matter who you are, hackers like Ford are trying to get your personal information," said Chris Hacker Special Agent in Charge of FBI Atlanta. "This case demonstrates the need to be careful in protecting personal information and passwords, especially in response to suspicious e-mails. Hopefully this is a lesson for everyone, not just the victims in this case."
Starting in March 2015, Ford used a phishing scheme to get the login credentials for the Apple accounts. He targeted NBA players, NFL players, and rappers, sending thousands of phishing emails spoofing legitimate customer service accounts.

Posing as an Apple support representative, Ford asked victims to send their usernames, passwords, and answers to security questions.

After getting this information, Ford would log into the Apple accounts and attempt to take them over. According to Apple, there were hundreds of unauthorized logins to victims' Apple accounts.

Stolen credit card details were then used to pay for things like air travel, hotels, furniture, money transfers, and more. He has been charged with six counts each of wire fraud, computer fraud, access device fraud, and aggravated identity theft. He pled guilty to one count of computer fraud and one count of aggravated identity theft.

For Apple users concerned with hacking attempts, it's always best to be wary. Apple does not email or cold call users asking for account information, so calls and emails requesting data are fake.

Apple has a dedicated support page with information on how to avoid phishing emails and other scam techniques that malicious individuals employ to extract information from Apple users.

Article Link: Georgia Man Pleads Guilty to Hacking Apple IDs of Professional Musicians and Athletes
 
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briko

macrumors newbie
Oct 20, 2015
23
113
It appears MacRumors used the article title from another source. You have a valid point, though.
Might be true for the article title, but this part really should be changed:

For Apple users concerned with hacking phishing attempts, it's always best to be wary. Apple does not email or cold call users asking for account information, so calls and emails requesting data are fake.
The article could also mention 2FA to quell reader concerns.
 
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macfacts

macrumors 68040
Oct 7, 2012
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How do you protect someone gullible from an email asking for their login details?

2FA only works if the user turns it on.
Sad that basically everything just gets turned around on Apple, pretty much automatically, essentially just because.
Apple already doesn't let you turn 2fa off if you used it for 2 weeks. Apple should just turn it on automatically when you activate your iPhone.

Or at least notify you when a new device logs into your account
 

C DM

macrumors Sandy Bridge
Oct 17, 2011
47,420
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Apple already doesn't let you turn 2fa off if you used it for 2 weeks. Apple should just turn it on automatically when you activate your iPhone.
Seems like the two statements are almost in conflict there.
 

EricOSU

macrumors newbie
Sep 26, 2012
13
5
Sad apple doesn't even try to prevent this. Got the most powerful bionic a12 chip and this is what you get.
How is this Apple’s fault? You turn on 2FA and don’t be a *ucktard and reply to an email with your name, password, security questions and if he would have asked I’m sure they would have given out their SSN as well. Remember you can’t fix stupid you can only hope Darwin wins out.
 

macfacts

macrumors 68040
Oct 7, 2012
3,477
4,059
Cybertron
How is this Apple’s fault? You turn on 2FA and don’t be a *ucktard and reply to an email with your name, password, security questions and if he would have asked I’m sure they would have given out their SSN as well. Remember you can’t fix stupid you can only hope Darwin wins out.
There's obviously a weakness in Apple's security if the hacker can get a list of celebrity emails.