Getting an MBA..

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by peapody, Jul 16, 2012.

  1. peapody macrumors 68040

    peapody

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2007
    Location:
    baltimore, md
    #1
    Anyone out there in a program? How important is the reputation of the program? I am about to jump in to either and MBA program or Hospital Admin program and I am just weighing my options right now. My hospital has tution assistance so I want to take advantage of it.

    Is any one out there balancing an MBA program with a full time job?
     
  2. GoCubsGo macrumors Nehalem

    GoCubsGo

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2005
    #2
    I think program reputation is somewhat key but accredited is probably most important. What did you want to do with an MBA?

    I did undergrad and grad with a full time + job (50+ hours a week) and while it was incredibly tough sometimes, I managed. I lost some stuff personally but that's another story and probably not related to the load as much as I used to think. :eek:
     
  3. gsugolfer macrumors 6502a

    gsugolfer

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2010
    Location:
    Georgia, USA
    #3
    I'd suggest a specific Master's degree before an MBA, personally. MBAs are becoming watered down, unfortunately.
     
  4. eternlgladiator macrumors 68000

    eternlgladiator

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2010
    Location:
    Twin Cities
    #4
    I tend to agree with golfer. It's kind of unfortunate but I think MBA's are starting to get kind of watered down since they're much more available, easy to attain, and relatively easy to complete depending on where/when. If it were me I'd find a slightly focused program and make sure it was a state accredited school, not an online business. That said, I think its better to have one than not in today's business climate but I'd do some serious checking and make sure that your investment will pay for itself in reasonable period. If the cost of the degree, out of your pocket since you said there is employer assistance, is more than you'd make back in a few years or doesn't give you a leg up that those few years of experience can then I wouldn't do it.
     
  5. peapody thread starter macrumors 68040

    peapody

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2007
    Location:
    baltimore, md
    #5
    It is to help me crack a glass ceiling in management of a large health system. Most of the corporate representatives/leadership have an MBA. The thought is to transition me from a clinician to a leadership/administrative/management role (I am a pharmacist).

    I was considering a masters in health administration, but it seems that an MBA is more versatile and more substantial since a masters in health care administration is a relatively new program.
     
  6. gsugolfer macrumors 6502a

    gsugolfer

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2010
    Location:
    Georgia, USA
    #7
    What's your age, if you don't mind me asking?

    Here's why I ask - there seems to be a large number of high-30s, low-40s types in MBA programs. They're all there for the same reason as you - a piece of paper to get a promotion.

    If you're younger, I'd definitely go for a more specialized degree. If you're in your 40s, I don't really have any advice to offer.

    In interest of full disclosure, I'm 24 with a Master's in Accounting. I might be biased towards the specialized degrees.
     
  7. peapody thread starter macrumors 68040

    peapody

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2007
    Location:
    baltimore, md
    #8
    I am 28. Does that matter? My goal position would be corporate vice president of pharmacy services at a health system. I feel without some degree that substantiates my leadership and management abilities, I would be stuck in my clinical specialty pharmacy role, which is not a bad thing..but not exactly what I want to do.

    The current person in my position has an MBA and is in fact, my mentor. She has both a PharmD, and MBA as well.
     
  8. gsugolfer macrumors 6502a

    gsugolfer

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2010
    Location:
    Georgia, USA
    #9
    Does it matter? Maybe, and maybe not.

    The reason I asked is simple. As I alluded to in my post, it seems that the larger population of people receiving MBAs are "older" (than the two of us anyways) experienced professionals. This might not be true in the case of the mentor you speak of, and I'm not extrapolating any statistics onto her.

    If you like the industry and see it as a stable field with good opportunity, I'd go for the specialized option. If it's not something you could see yourself doing for the rest of your life, get the MBA.
     

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