Getting client to use cloud tech

RobDee

macrumors member
Original poster
Jul 21, 2008
50
0
I am trying to reduce IT support incidents for a client. (Bosses are my brother and sister-in-law.

Most of it is setting up replacement PCs.

The problem is that some PCs are critical (act as servers for Contact Management software, Sage etc.)

This causes disruption to business.

I want to move them to cloud based services so business is not disrupted on PC breakdown and so that they can use any computer to access these services (via browser). Do not want expensive dedicated server overkill.

However, that are very non-tech and don't understand why this is of benefit. I say it will save them money but they do not trust/understand the tech. i.e. they confuse the ethernet cable with the power cable on a MacBook Pro.

I have tried to explain the tech many times.

Can anyone point me to any info on the web that talks about IT trust so I don't end up pulling all my hair out?

Thanks!
 

mobilehaathi

macrumors G3
Aug 19, 2008
9,351
6,218
The Anthropocene
If they don't understand the tech, then you need to abstract it more so they can actually understand what you're proposing and why you think it is a better solution.

Don't talk about ethernet, servers, "the cloud," etc. Just get to a white board and draw some squares to represent computers that do a particular job, lines to represent connections, etc.. Explain how that system helps them now and why you think there are weaknesses. Then sketch out your solution and explain how it is more robust. It shouldn't be too hard to communicate without diving into tech details.
 

GoCubsGo

macrumors Nehalem
Feb 19, 2005
35,753
142
Something for:
http://www.forbes.com/sites/louiscolumbus/2013/03/12/why-cloud-computing-is-slowly-winning-the-trust-war/

http://cloud.media.seagate.com/2013/03/14/businesses-increasing-trust-in-cloud-services/

Something against:
http://www.computerweekly.com/news/2240174444/Most-IT-pros-do-not-trust-cloud-services-with-sensitive-data

A paper written about it:
Trust as a Service: A Framework for Trust Management in Cloud Environments
http://ccl.northwestern.edu/papers/2011/WISE76.pdf

The list goes on and on. There is really no one stop shop to answer and alleviate all fears of cloud computing.
 

RobDee

macrumors member
Original poster
Jul 21, 2008
50
0
If they don't understand the tech, then you need to abstract it more so they can actually understand what you're proposing and why you think it is a better solution.

Don't talk about ethernet, servers, "the cloud," etc. Just get to a white board and draw some squares to represent computers that do a particular job, lines to represent connections, etc.. Explain how that system helps them now and why you think there are weaknesses. Then sketch out your solution and explain how it is more robust. It shouldn't be too hard to communicate without diving into tech details.
Brilliant, thanks. I will use this idea.

----------

Something for:
http://www.forbes.com/sites/louiscolumbus/2013/03/12/why-cloud-computing-is-slowly-winning-the-trust-war/

http://cloud.media.seagate.com/2013/03/14/businesses-increasing-trust-in-cloud-services/

Something against:
http://www.computerweekly.com/news/2240174444/Most-IT-pros-do-not-trust-cloud-services-with-sensitive-data

A paper written about it:
Trust as a Service: A Framework for Trust Management in Cloud Environments
http://ccl.northwestern.edu/papers/2011/WISE76.pdf

The list goes on and on. There is really no one stop shop to answer and alleviate all fears of cloud computing.
Thanks. Not quite what I was looking for.

However, I would say that I have access to lots of senstive data for lots of clients in single locations. That's a lot of trust in one person. If my clients embrace cloud services, that surely means that they are distributing trust among many organisations who have to maintain that trust in order to continue as a business. A better scenario? I think so.