getting files from dead imac

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by shanner, Nov 9, 2010.

  1. shanner macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2004
    #1
    Hi!

    I have an old G5 intel imac which wont boot. I don't know much but I guess it's a hardware problem. I tried resetting PRAM etc and tried target disk mode using a new imac. nothing worked. Just a black screen, no chime and whirring fan.
    I don't really mind though - I suppose it's just dead but I would like to get music, photos etc from old machine. Can anyone tell me the best way to do this? Do I have to take out the hard disk? Is that difficult?

    Is there anything I could try that I might not have done?

    Thanks!
     
  2. spinnerlys Guest

    spinnerlys

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2008
    Location:
    forlod bygningen
    #2
    You could try TARGET DISK MODE.

    If that does not work: http://www.ifixit.com/Browse/iMac

    Btw, either you iMac is using an IBM CPU, called G5, thus was released before 2006, or you have an Intel CPU, Core (2) Duo, and it was released from 2006 onwards. There is no such thing as an "Intel G5" Mac.
     
  3. John T macrumors 68020

    John T

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2006
    Location:
    UK.
    #3
    When my G5 iMac died, I removed the drive, put it in a caddy and transferred everything on it to my new iMac using Migration Assistant. That way, I retained all my settings for mail, itunes, iPhone etc.
     
  4. eckndu macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2008
    #4
    whats that?
     
  5. spinnerlys Guest

    spinnerlys

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2008
    Location:
    forlod bygningen
    #5
    An enclosure for HDDs or other storage devices, often referred to as "external enclosure".

    [​IMG]
     
  6. shanner thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2004
    #6
    thanks for all that.

    I tried starting from Target Disk Mode using another imac but it didn't work.

    I think I'm going to have to remove the HD myself.

    thanks also for those step by step instructions but having never tried anything like that can anyone tell me if it's fairly foolproof or if there's a risk of damaging the hard drive irrevocably?

    Is the process more changing a wheel on a car, or performing surgery?
     
  7. spinnerlys Guest

    spinnerlys

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2008
    Location:
    forlod bygningen
    #7
    In between, but closer to changing a car tire.
    Btw, you have to be really clumsy to damage the HDD during the dismantling process, it is more probable to damage any other smaller or more vulnerable part.
     

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