Getting service work done on an iMac - Concern about personal data...

Discussion in 'iMac' started by HXGuy, Sep 16, 2010.

  1. HXGuy macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2010
    #1
    Couple issues...

    I need to have my video card on my 27" iMac replaced. I went into the Apple store and they said they need the computer for a couple days so Im going to drop it off over the weekend.

    1. I have some pirated software on there. Will they care about that (could void warranty?).

    2. What about personal data? This is a work computer and I have a lot of customer's data on there (credit card info and such stored in QuickBooks).

    Is it better to wipe the drive clean and then restore from Time Machine when I get the computer back? Seems like a lot of hassle.
     
  2. Thezez macrumors newbie

    Thezez

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2005
    Location:
    Auckland, New Zealand
  3. HXGuy thread starter macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2010
  4. plymman macrumors member

    Joined:
    May 9, 2010
    #4
    Personally I'd always wipe a computer before sending it to be fixed. I work in IT and know people who like to have a good snoop around so for privacy alone I'd clear install and restore with time machine when you get it back, you can never guarantee the data on the drive will be safe anyway after a repair.
     
  5. Lordedmond macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2008
    Location:
    Tilchestune UK
    #5
    what then is the score for personal data stored on the HD ( imac) when its going in for repair when all you get is a black screen and a loud beep.

    no chance to secure the data ( no ify software in this case )


    thats what i am faced with :eek:


    I have no chance to erase any data as the Imac is Dead ,kaput "K" for not working
     
  6. HXGuy thread starter macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2010
    #6
    Was about to make another post about the same issue.

    Im a bit concerned about the other data I have on the computer, especially since its my work computer and I store a lot of customer's personal data (credit card numbers and such) in QuickBooks plus all my company financial data.

    Would I be better off just erasing everything and restore from Time Machine when I get the computer back? I'm a bit afraid of that method too...what if it doesn't restore correctly from Time Machine and I lose everything?

    Can I make some sort of guest account for them to use when they fix it or can/will they crack the admin password? Do they need Admin access when replacing the video card?

    To follow up, I called the Apple store and they said that I could create a Guest Account for them to access and just password my account.

    Sounds like a good option?
     
  7. HvyMtlPlyr macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2010
    #7
    When my HD failed I had the same concerns (personal data, financial info, tax records, etc.). I'm in IT and I know some of the repair guys like to snoop. Even though the drive failed you can usually check them out by putting it in an external drive case (not that these guys have that much time on their hands - but you never know). Had one guy come out and tell one of my techs he wanted to be there when we did it as he had pics of his wife on it ;) Also, I've seen too many stories of people bringing their computers in for repair and then 6 months later get a call from someone in another state that bought their drive off ebay or from some flee market and all their personal data was on it.

    Anyhow, my Apple store gave me the old drive back after they replaced it with a new one. I then physically destroyed the drive.

    Guest account sounds like a good idea. Nothing is 100% but they'd have to hack your account to get in it - which I'm guessing they're not inclined to do.
     
  8. plymman macrumors member

    Joined:
    May 9, 2010
    #8
    Personally I'd always wipe a computer before sending it to be fixed. I work in IT and know people who like to have a good snoop around so for privacy alone I'd clear install and restore with time machine when you get it back, you can never guarantee the data on the drive will be safe anyway after a repair.
     

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