Getting the iMac G4 on the Internet

FigmentNewtonII

macrumors member
Original poster
Apr 9, 2012
47
1
Recently I obtained an iMac G4. It has a 1 GHz CPU, 1.25 GB of RAM, and is running on Mac OSX 10.5.8. I have no options for a hardline and I don't necessarily want to buy a wireless card. In my efforts to get my G4 on the internet, I used an ethernet cord to tether it to my Macbook Pro (Mid-2010). I went into system preferences, then to "sharing."

These are the setting currently set up for the Macbook Pro:


These are the setting currently set up for the iMac G4:


From the settings, it should work. When I open networking on activity monitor on my G4 there is data being received and sent. There are times that my iMac will get on the internet and other times I just get error screens. Is there an extra step that I'm missing? Please help. :confused:
 

wobegong

Guest
May 29, 2012
418
1
From your post it all looks like it is set up correctly (no sharing options needed on the G4 and Internet sharing from WiFi to Ethernet on the Macbook).

The only other thing I can think of is to check your network settings, DHCP, make sure you have no 'hard coded' preset gateway/DNS - all of this should be automatically received from the Macbook. There may be some leftover DNS/Gateway IP's in here which would stop it working, make sure its all DHCP on the G4.
 

eyoungren

macrumors Core
Aug 31, 2011
21,344
13,205
ten-zero-eleven-zero-zero by zero-two
Keep internet sharing off on the G4. Make sure that you have DHCP set for the G4. If the G4 does not get a IP address then try setting a static one in the IP range of your router, but one that isn't being used.

I used to share my PowerBook's connection to my son's iBook G3 when at Starbucks (the antenna is shot) and this is how we did it.
 

chibiterasu

macrumors 6502
Apr 5, 2012
334
15
London, The United Kingdom
This does look like a mess to save $10-$15 on a wireless card, that will hardly ever let you down.

I maybe wrong but don't you need a ethernet crossover cable when connecting from computer to computer without a hub or switch in between?
 

MisterKeeks

macrumors 68000
Nov 15, 2012
1,832
25
This does look like a mess to save $10-$15 on a wireless card, that will hardly ever let you down.

I maybe wrong but don't you need a ethernet crossover cable when connecting from computer to computer without a hub or switch in between?
No need for a crossover cable.
 

eyoungren

macrumors Core
Aug 31, 2011
21,344
13,205
ten-zero-eleven-zero-zero by zero-two
The way I read the original post, I don't think the OP has or is using a router, hence the ethernet connection from computer to computer.
Well, there is a router somewhere. I am assuming the MBP and the G4 are at home. Unless the MBP is tethered to a phone or a mobile hotspot then his home internet has a router.

----------

This does look like a mess to save $10-$15 on a wireless card, that will hardly ever let you down.

I maybe wrong but don't you need a ethernet crossover cable when connecting from computer to computer without a hub or switch in between?
No, as already said, you don't need a crossover cable. My son and I got by just fine at Starbucks with me sharing the connection and his (then) iBook using a CAT5 ethernet cable.

I agree, it's somewhat of a hassle for $10-15, but my son's iBook has a real bad antenna. I've used two good working Airport cards in that Mac, but unless it's sitting right next to a WAP it drops connection frequently and consistently. So, if you can get this working it's a good alternative.
 

wobegong

Guest
May 29, 2012
418
1
I agree, it's somewhat of a hassle for $10-15, but my son's iBook has a real bad antenna.
Was a well documented problem on the Powerbook as well, mine was a nightmare in hotels where often rooms would have a less than perfect signal, meanwhile the colleague sitting next to me with his plastic generic M$ crapbook would have no problems at all......
 

jbarley

macrumors 68040
Jul 1, 2006
3,793
1,629
Vancouver Island
Well, there is a router somewhere. I am assuming the MBP and the G4 are at home. Unless the MBP is tethered to a phone or a mobile hotspot then his home internet has a router.
Thats odd, my home internet works just fine without a router, my computer is connected directly to my shaw internet cable modem.
And to save you the need to ask, "no it is not a modem-router combination".
 

eyoungren

macrumors Core
Aug 31, 2011
21,344
13,205
ten-zero-eleven-zero-zero by zero-two
Thats odd, my home internet works just fine without a router, my computer is connected directly to my shaw internet modem.
And to save you the need to ask, "no it is not a modem-router combination".
Ahh, I see where you are going with that. Yes, that's possible. Your ISP is assigning you an address directly through the modem. If you check your IP it probably does NOT start with 192.168.x.x, but an IP address that is in the range of those your ISP uses. If you have other computers in your home you have probably used your ISP's web interface to manage IP addresses or you share your connection, or something else.

If that is the case (you have your ISPs provided IP address), you sir are connected directly to the internet and if anyone happens to know your IP address can attempt to access your computer directly. I assume you have protection.

I'm operating a little differently. Cox Communications has assigned me an IP address of 24.251.60.200. But my modem is connected to a router from which I get my statically assigned internal addresses for all my devices on the home network (192.168.0.150 for this Mac). I just assumed most people by now were behind routers (with the exceptions of those still using dialup) and not directly connected.
 
The OP pic of the MBP shows that he is using WiFi for the initial connection on the MBP, so would that also assume that he almost certainly has a WiFi router in the mix?

If the OP has the settings shown, and does not have access to the router to set static IPs, then it would be advisable to have the G4 set for DHCP and the other settings shown kept the same.

If the router (wherever it is) is set for MAC address filtering would the G4 still be able to address the router through the MBP? If not then that could be a/the problem.

Basically, I think we need more information on what is on the network outside of the Mac's involved to give a real answer on what may be going on.:)