Given that I use Bootcamp, which machine to choose?

Discussion in 'Windows, Linux & Others on the Mac' started by hajime, Jan 18, 2016.

  1. hajime macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2007
    #1
    Hello, since Windows work differently, I am posting here.

    I have a MacBook Pro 2010 17" with me right now. Between 2012-2014, I used a rMBP 15" 2012. In 2014-a week ago, I used a rMBP 15" 2014. In add three machines, I used Bootcamp and installed Windows 7 in the Bootcamp partitions. I used Winclone to backup the Windows partition.

    I am waiting for the up-coming new Mac laptop which might be available in March or May. After upgrading to EI Capitan, the performance of my MBP 2010 17" became slow. I checked. Mail is not the cause for the slowdown.

    1. Since I have been using MBP, will there be issues if I restore the backuped Windows partition (using Winclone) on a MacBook or MacBook Air?

    2. If I buy a Surface Pro 4 or MacBook, will I be able to put the backuped Windows parition to any of these machines?

    3. If I upgrade the HD of my MBP 2010 17" to SSD, do you think I will have issues given that rMBP 2012 and rMBP 2014 have more advanced hardware. I guess I might have to use the Windows installed on this laptop as the base and manually copy the files from the Windows partition of rMBP 2012 and 2014.

    Any suggestion appreciated. Thanks.
     
  2. Altemose macrumors G3

    Altemose

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2013
    Location:
    Elkton, Maryland
    #2
    @hajime

    1. I would seize the opportunity to start a fresh Windows installation and avoid bringing over drivers and support software from your older MacBook Pro to a new machine.

    2. In theory, you can clone the partition but for reliability concerns it would be best to begin fresh and migrate data back.

    3. I own both a 2008 MacBook Pro and a mid 2012 which both are equipped with maximum RAM (for the respective models) as well as high quality SSDs. The 2008 would never keep up with my 2012 in terms of computational tasks (e.g. video editing, rendering, etc.), however in day to day use the 2008 feels like a speedy recent machine with the exception of physical design. If you are looking for a significant speed improvement in day to day activity, then the SSD and RAM upgrade would be money well spent. However, if your machine if falling short on your needs (e.g. video games, video editing, etc.) then it would be in your best interest to replace it.
     
  3. hajime thread starter macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2007
    #3

    Thanks Altemose. In all cases, what is the best way to migrate data back?

    I plan to buy the maxed model of whatever Apple sells this year. The problem is that we don't know when the new laptops will be out. Rumors is that they will be out in March or June. So, for the time being, I am considering to just upgrade the storage of my 2010 MBP 17" from HD to SSD, buy a SP4, or get a MacBook.
     
  4. Altemose macrumors G3

    Altemose

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2013
    Location:
    Elkton, Maryland
    #4
    I personally would migrate the data manually. While it is a huge pain to do so, it offers you a great time to do some housekeeping and organize/consolidate files and keep your new machine fresh. Apple Refurbished is by far the best way to save some serious money on whatever machine you want plus they come with identical warranties. The only noticeable difference between an Apple refurbished machine and a new one is the box.

    In my personal opinion, I would go ahead and get a quality SSD for your current MacBook Pro. Despite its age, it is a decent machine and depending on your needs may be capable of serving you for years to come with an SSD upgrade. Furthermore, OS X Mavericks and newer operating systems really perk up when being installed to an SSD rather than a HDD. What are your computer needs? How much RAM is in your current system?

    I tried a few computers out when I last was choosing one, namely the Surface line and even 2 in 1 computers. The issue I found was design oversights in both. When using a laptop, I have zero incentive to touch the screen due to the simple fact that it is unergonomic. The Surface also falls short in the fact that it is a royal pain to attempt to use on your lap. A common fault I found in 2 in 1s regardless of manufacturer is the wobbly hinges, where even a slight touch of the screen let the screen vibrate from weak hinge design. This ruins the ergonomics and benefits of having a touch screen to begin with.
     
  5. hajime thread starter macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2007
    #5

    I used Winclone to backup the Windows partition. Can I view the files and migrate the data manually?

    My current MBP mid 2010 17" has 2.66GHz i7 and 8GB 1067MHz DDR3. My used-to-be work machine is a rMBP 2012 with 16GB RAM. I use Solidworks 3D CAD, Office, Matlab. I also use Illustrator and Photoshop.

    One cool thing about the SP4 is that when using SolidWorks, I could probably manipulate 3D objects using fingers. If I get the SP4, I will probably put in on the desk at an angle of about 20 degrees, connect it to an external monitor and use the screen of the SP4 as a large tablet, trackpad.
     
  6. Gjwilly macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    May 1, 2011
    Location:
    SF Bay Area

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