Glossy : I want someone to explain to me.

Discussion in 'Apple, Inc and Tech Industry' started by /V\acpower, Nov 10, 2008.

  1. /V\acpower macrumors 6502a

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    Jul 31, 2007
    #1
    Ok, lots of peoples freaks out about glossy screen, and the MAIN thing that always comes out is that it "changes" color accuracy.

    But, what does make color on a glossy screen innacurate compared to a matte screen since the last one add a "filter" on the screen that affect light who passes through it ?

    In other word, what in the process of passing trought a clear glass makes color "less accurate" ? (since it IS clear glass....just like my glasses.)
     
  2. FrankieTDouglas macrumors 65816

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    #2
    For starters, things that are glossy reflect light. This means in addition to looking at your image, you are also looking at the colors of your room reflecting back at you. You look through your glasses. Look at someone else who is wearing glasses. See those reflections? Think of your monitor like that.
     
  3. isIRus macrumors newbie

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    #3
    Ended! Nice Explenation...;)
     
  4. bashveank macrumors member

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    #4
    What if you're using a glossy screen in a dark room?
     
  5. zombie1210 macrumors regular

    zombie1210

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    #5
    Other makers have used glossy screens. I don't see what all the hubbub is about. They work fine. Its not like its a new concept.
     
  6. Kwill macrumors 68000

    Kwill

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    #6
    A discussion about screen calibration led to this point about glossy screens.

     
  7. zombie1210 macrumors regular

    zombie1210

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    #7
    "Graphics Professionals" use 13 inch Macbooks?

    Wow.
    :rolleyes:
     
  8. thejadedmonkey macrumors 604

    thejadedmonkey

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    #8
    Why not?
     
  9. zombie1210 macrumors regular

    zombie1210

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    #9
    Do they really?

    Seems to me that a pro might want something larger.
     
  10. bashveank macrumors member

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    #10
    but calibrated properly and in a dark room, is glossy color accurate?
     
  11. kkat69 macrumors 68020

    kkat69

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    #11
    I'm curious, I had my iMac calibrated and my print and display color is pretty damn near on mark. Of course I had it calibrated with the GLASS removed (which isn't actually true glass but a polymer) so my question is, are people having issue calibrating colors removing the 'glass' cover thus using the excuse of light reflection?

    Yes, I know the LCD beneath the 'glass' is also glossy coated and to me the colors do really seem 'snappier' (couldn't resist working that in) but as long as I was able to calibrate it properly, I haven't had ANY issues regarding color.

    I'm unsure about the current ALUM books if that protective 'glass' cover is removable, BUT (and this is the important party kiddies) even if the LCD beneath the cover was matte you wouldn't be able to properly calibrate it ANYWAY.

    So again, has anyone calibrated an Alum iMac (with the cover off) or any other new Mac with the protective cover off to prove or disprove the actual LCD is causing calibration issues?

    I see the posts a lot but no one has specified (that I found) if they did the calibration with the cover removed.

    EDIT: I failed to mention that my calibration and the calibration I refer to is with an external device.
     
  12. GoCubsGo macrumors Nehalem

    GoCubsGo

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    #12
    Colors look over saturated.
     
  13. robbieduncan Moderator emeritus

    robbieduncan

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    #13
    Or 15" MacBook Pros which now only come in glossy too...
     
  14. Kwill macrumors 68000

    Kwill

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    #14
    "Graphics Professionals" may use a variety of computers. Currently, I use three and none are MacBooks. Where did you get that idea. :confused:

    The Apple Discussion was regarding the 24" iMac with glossy screen. The point made about calibration is that even the lowest brightness setting is way above target luminosity of 120. Though color hue can be set accurately, minimum luminosity is 160 (190 max). New LED displays are advertised as brighter (to offset glare) which can introduce more problems with luminosity settings.
     
  15. duncyboy macrumors 6502a

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    #15
    You'd still have the light from the monitor itself lighting your desk/face/clothes etc and being reflected in the dark. The impact would be much reduced in comparison to the day time or a brightly lit room but still there :)
     
  16. chaos86 macrumors 65816

    chaos86

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    #16
    Did everybody forget that matte screens reflect light too, but it's diffused?
    My Matte Powerbook gave me more reflection trouble than my Glossy MBP because (I believe) with the gloss, my brain can pick out and ignore the well defined reflections, but with matte, it's all a blur that can't be ignored.
     
  17. Kwill macrumors 68000

    Kwill

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    #17
    The defused reflections from a matte screen are negligible. I doubt if most users even realize they are there. I have a Mac with a 23" ACD (matte) facing a window and a 24" iMac (glossy) facing away. Reflections on the glossy screen are not a problem in a dark room. However, in darkness pupils dilate so there is generally a desire to turn down the brightness. Unfortunately the iMac is turned down to its minimum brightness (160 L) even in daylight. :eek:
     
  18. holden15 macrumors member

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    #18
    Just got an iMac a few weeks ago. I have no problem with the glossy screen.

    The iMac has the best looking screen I have ever seen, better than my MacBook Pro. (early 2008)
     
  19. FrankieTDouglas macrumors 65816

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    #19
    So, you have it properly calibrated and an appropriate brightness? If so, then you have no problems. Or you aren't interested in such things?
     
  20. SnowLeopard2008 macrumors 604

    SnowLeopard2008

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    #20
    My MB's glossy screen isn't that bad. I don't see my reflection or anything. Just look at it and if you like it, then your fine.
     
  21. Digital Skunk macrumors 604

    Digital Skunk

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    #21
    GLOSSY SCREENS DO NOT hinder color accuracy. For those too young to remember CRTs were glossy....

    And for those too young to remember or who never went to college and got a proper image toning/color proofing education you can get accurate color on a B&W monitor.... like the ones used in the early days of desktop publishing.

    The glossy screens do suck since they have a reflection, but in NO way does it effect your color accuracy.

    If they are, please see this link.

    p.s. over-saturation and bad color comes from using the laptop displays, which DO have a color shift going from the matte to the glossy. Getting it close is the best you will do with a laptop display most time anyway.
     
  22. iGary Guest

    iGary

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    #22
    The space between the glass and the actual LCD itself is more of an issue for calibration. CRT's don't have this air gap.

    I have no issues with the color workflow on my laptop - never had to settle for getting it "close."
     
  23. Digital Skunk macrumors 604

    Digital Skunk

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    #23
    True, as for laptops their color gamut is just too short for me. In good lighting you can tell the difference between an image on a 23" ACD, the 17" hi res MBP, and the print itself.
     
  24. iGary Guest

    iGary

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    #24
    I won't disagree - I get more consistent and pleasant results out of my ACD than my MBP, so that's where I usually print from.

    I actually have a friend that takes off the glass front on his iMac and calibrates right to the glossy LCD. He seems to have good luck with that, but what a pain in the ass.

    Just wish Apple would, at least in the pro offerings, give us a choice.

    If they go all glossy on their ACD's, which looks like the case, I'll have to get my displays elsewhere, or buy used ones online, which is saying a lot considering my blind Apple allegiance.

    Anywhoo...
     
  25. Kwill macrumors 68000

    Kwill

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    Mar 10, 2003
    #25
    Agreed. Reflection is more of a problem than lack of color accuracy. I calibrate every month with a glossy screen with the proper hardware. The software I use with eye-one device has the user specify whether profiling an LCD, laptop or CRT monitor as the first step.

    Removing CLEAR glass to obtain better hardware calibration results is unnecessary. The reference book quoted makes a distinction between visual calibration and hardware calibration. As a carry-over from CRT days, the first instruction for visual calibration is generally to set display to maximum brightness. This is an inappropriate step for new LCD (or LED) displays.

    Apple's misguided reaction to reflections is to increase luminance way beyond what graphic designers and photographers require for print simulation. So, though color cast can be eliminated from ICC profiles created with hardware devices, simulated paper brightness will be off and displays can wear out pupils in a dark room.

    Desktop LCD displays have a constant source of power whereas laptops run on batteries. Hence laptops are generally not as bright as LCD ADC. LED is even brighter than LCD. These are the areas that most concern those in the professional printing industry.
     

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