Going to Greece in Two Weeks. Need shooting advice.

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by mohmandm, Aug 17, 2011.

  1. mohmandm macrumors member

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2004
    Location:
    east lansing
    #1
    I am an amateur photographer at best. I am taking a trip to Greece starting September 1st and will be gone for two weeks. I have a Canon t2i, 50mm 1.8 canon lens, borrowing a Tamron 17-55(?) mm lens, also have a 55-250mm 4-5.6 lens. I will primarily be looking to shoot landscape photos. I have a couple of filters like polarized and ND. I also have two memory cards, two batteries and a cheap mini-tripod that is easily transported.

    What I am looking for from you guys:

    -Basic tips on shooting landscape photos
    -Any equipment that would be a good idea to bring
    -What lenses to use when


    I realize you can only give me so much info in a forum but any help will be greatly appreciated!

    Regards,
     
  2. VirtualRain macrumors 603

    VirtualRain

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2008
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC
    #2
    I'm not sure what you mean by a mini-tripod... but you may want to ensure it's sturdy and practical enough for taking some long exposure shots with your camera/lens attached. This is perhaps one of the most important pieces of your kit and will really open up possibilities for evening shots where longer shutter speeds are required.

    Other than that, all the regular recommendations apply... golden hour, rule of thirds, waiting for good light, trying to capture things from unconventional angles or vantage points, etc.

    For Greece, I imagine that renting a boat to get interesting vantage points of the coastal towns/islands from a distance might be worth while.

    That's all that comes to mind immediately.
     
  3. jackerin macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2008
    Location:
    Finland
    #3
    The size will probably not match the tamron lens you're borrowing, so keep that in mind. If you see a waterfall put on the ND, close down the aperture and do a long exposure just for the cliché. The CPL is most effective for landscapes when used at a 90° angle to the sun. Don't use the tele when it gets darker.
     
  4. Phrasikleia macrumors 601

    Phrasikleia

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2008
    Location:
    Over there------->
    #4
    All good advice, especially the bit about shooting during the golden hour. Greece has very bright light most of the year, so you're likely to get poor shots indeed if you shoot during the middle of the day when the sun is high and harsh.

    Unfortunately, a lot of Greek archaeological parks close at 3pm, so if you want nice photos while visiting them, go as early as possible. Some will be open later, but those sites are rare, and with the new austerity measures, some have cut back on their opening hours. Before visiting one, call ahead to find out what their current hours are (whatever your guide book says is likely to be wrong). Sunset during early September in Greece will be around 7:45pm, so the best light won't start until about 6pm. Sunrise will be about 7am, so the light will start to get harsh by about 9am.

    The middle of the day is a good time to go inside museums, most of which will allow photography, though a few notable ones do not (the New Acropolis Museum, for example).

    All museums and archaeological parks in Greece prohibit the use of tripods.

    Of course, photo ops in Greece outside of the parks and museums abound, especially if you can get out of the big cities. There are so many quaint little villages and seaside towns where you can have a lot of fun shooting landscapes. If you see something great while the light is too harsh, consider returning to the spot later in the day or early the next morning. That's how you'll end up with extra special photos. :)
     
  5. Keleko macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2008
    #5
  6. VirtualRain macrumors 603

    VirtualRain

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2008
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC
    #6
    As a side note, this seems common at tourist attractions... why is that? :confused:
     
  7. Phrasikleia macrumors 601

    Phrasikleia

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2008
    Location:
    Over there------->
    #7
    I've been told it's because they don't want to be held liable for people tripping over the leg of somebody's tripod. Also, photographers with tripods tend to hog the best spots; they set up and stay in place for a while, instead of circulating through the site/museum. I fully understand the tripod prohibition, though it's painful for me. It's the outright prohibitions against photography that really get my goat.
     
  8. flosseR macrumors 6502a

    flosseR

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2009
    Location:
    the cold dark north
    #8
    Just came back from Greece and yes all of the above suggestions. The two things I was very happy for was my circular polarizer and an ND filter. It helps immensely when shooting during the day.
     
  9. scidoc macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2011
    Location:
    Pacific Northwest
    #9
    Going to Greece

    If you're in Athens, a gotta-go-to place is of course, the Acropolis. Go to the roof of the Hotel Plaka in the old city.

    http://www.plakahotel.gr/

    Pretend you're staying there and head up to the roof. I was there in 2006 and if I remember correctly,you can take the elevator to the 5th floor and walk up one flight of stairs. Or if your knees are better than mine, walk up the stairs. There is a drop dead unobstructed view of the Acropolis. The Acropolis is extremely well lit at night and if you can be there around 9/12 when the full moon rises over the Acropolis, OMG!!!!!!!
     
  10. Ruahrc macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2009
    #10
    I also heard some places also don't allow tripods on the basis that the (possibly spiked) feet may damage fragile ruins or archeological sites.

    Ruahrc
     
  11. joemod macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2010
    Location:
    Athens, Greece
    #11
    Hey! you are welcome! As an additional info get an adapter for schuco power sockets as US and Greek power sockets are not the same.
    Which places will you visit?

    Off topic but for your info. Initially the NAM allowed the use of cameras but prohibited the use of flash. Very few people respected this rule so they now prohibit the use of cameras to take pictures of the objects displayed (I remember members of foreign delegation dressed in full suite taking pictures using flash...) . They do allow however taking pictures of anything outside the museum, the most important of which is Acropolis of course.
     
  12. Phrasikleia macrumors 601

    Phrasikleia

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2008
    Location:
    Over there------->
    #12
    Oh yes, I know all about it. It's actually more complicated than that; reportedly, people were also touching the sculptures while posing with them for pictures, but perhaps most to the point, the director has a publication in the works and became concerned about someone stealing his thunder. He told me personally that he may agree to a reversal of the ban in the future, but I'll be impressed if it actually happens. For a short while after instituting the ban, they were allowing scholars some photography privileges (individually, while the museum was closed, and with a guard present), yet I know of at least one prominent German scholar/photographer who was denied such access fairly early on. At any rate, yes, it's off topic. If the OP wants to have some fun photographing antiquities in Athens, the National Museum is a great place to go: good access, good light, and a spectacular collection.
     

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