Golden Retriver owners, please help me

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by 66217, May 5, 2007.

  1. 66217 Guest

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2006
    #1
    I am getting crazy. Every summer my dog would generate this allergy that makes him scratch non-stop and a hot spot would appear.

    I am certain it is not food related, as it only happens on summer. It must be a pollen or maybe the hot climate. But I haven't yet found the way to stop this from happening.

    My vet gave me some options:
    1- to use cortisone, this way he won't scratch and no more hot spots. But he warns me that cortisone may damage his liver if given to him for long periods of time.
    2- make some blood tests and see what is causing him the allergy and find if there is a way to stop it (this one is expensive).
    3- bath him every 3 days to see if this stop him from developing hot spots (I've tried this one, with no positive results).

    Anyone here found a way of preventing the hot spots. I've read about some vitamins in the internet that help, but they just seem too good to be true.

    Please, any help is appreciated.

    Thanks,
     
  2. iSaint macrumors 603

    iSaint

    Joined:
    May 26, 2004
    Location:
    South Mississippi y'all, near the water!
    #2
    Sounds like allergies. I trust my vet's opinion. However, with so many possibilities, you might consider a second opinion.
     
  3. SkyBell macrumors 604

    SkyBell

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2006
    Location:
    Texas, unfortunately.
    #3
    It's worse for us. We did option #2, and out of the 50 most common allergens they tested, she was allergic to 48 of them.

    We have to use a certain spray medication on her, because she scratches so much she has lost all her hair where she scratches and the spots bleed at random intervals through the day.

    Hope your dog feels better.
     
  4. 66217 thread starter Guest

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2006
    #4
    What kind of spray do you use? I have one that is only to make him not scratch. It has cortisone I think.

    Right now he has a hot spot (the first of the year, and the one I suffer the most. I had the hope that maybe this year he wouldn't develop any) in the foreleg.
    I gave him oral cortisone, because he was refusing to eat and is all depressed. And I am certain this will help, but I don't want to drug him every day because of hot spots.
     
  5. srf4real macrumors 68030

    srf4real

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2006
    Location:
    paradise beach FL
    #5
    First and cheapest option I would try is an all natural diet - Veterinary approved natural dog food only, no people food! Check for fleas - many many pets are allergic to fleas but get diagnosed with a zillion other silly allergies by necessity. (The tests cost alot - gotta make it seem worthwhile.);)
     
  6. juanster macrumors 68020

    juanster

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2007
    Location:
    toronto
    #6
    don t shower your dog every three days, dog's skin does not have sweat glands all over their body, so getting the skin wet every three days will only dry it up and make it more itchy i know a vet said to do this but i don t recommend it(I am not a vet YET, but i have lots of experience with dogs.) yes it could very easily be allergies, because it happens at a certain period of time but this could also be a parasite that only lives or only attacks during this time of the year, you can try giving him, not a bath but clean his hair and skin with a damp cloth with a solution of 1/10 white vinegar and water (don t worry after it dries your dog won t smell like vinegar) i am pretty sure this will help relieve some itching and make him feel better, the only reason i am advising you on this is because it cannot possibly have any side effects or hurt or make it worst, i would not recommend you to listen to any prescription or judgement unless there is at least pictures.....let me know how it goes...you can do this once a day until his skin is a little bit damp with the solution....
     
  7. 66217 thread starter Guest

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2006
    #7
    I've used some flea collars and a spray to kill fleas. But I am not completely sure about fleas.

    Do they exist in cities?
     
  8. 66217 thread starter Guest

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2006
    #8
    Thanks for the tip. I'll tell you if it works.

    And what you say about bathing him every 3 days is correct. Dogs are not like us.

    But I didn't understand what you mean when saying
     
  9. jsw Moderator emeritus

    jsw

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2004
    Location:
    Andover, MA
    #9
    Yes. As do other parasites. I strongly recommend a vet-quality (prescription) flea and tick medication. Goldens have such long fur that ticks and fleas are easily missed.

    As far as hot spots, my golden has a wheat allergy, and removing wheat (via proper food selection) has helped enormously.

    Are you careful about your dog's diet (treats and people food - which might also be seasonal - can be detrimental)?
     
  10. 66217 thread starter Guest

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2006
    #10
    I'll give it another try. I'll ask my vet for something against fleas and ticks.

    I always buy the same type of food to my dog.
    When the first hot spot appeared my vet helped me trying different types of food. We even bought a book with instructions of how to cook food for dogs. But none of this helped.:(
     
  11. MacNut macrumors Core

    MacNut

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2002
    Location:
    CT
    #11
    Is this a problem with most Goldens? Im thinking of getting one as my next dog.
     
  12. srf4real macrumors 68030

    srf4real

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2006
    Location:
    paradise beach FL
    #12
    Frontline or Advantage are the ONLY ones that work for real flea control. Do not buy generic, over the counter, or cheaper and expect good results. I'm in the pest control business and I will not guarantee that my home flea treatments work unless pets are on Frontline or Advantage. Fleas love carpet, drapes, upholstery, dirt, grass... no city with mild or warm summers is immune. But first, or course inspect your dog very carefully and be sure he has fleas.:p
     
  13. jsw Moderator emeritus

    jsw

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2004
    Location:
    Andover, MA
    #13
    It probably won't help the hot spots (unless they're flea-related) but it's always a good idea.
    Well, as I'm guessing your vet told you, some allergies take a long time to go away because the dog's body takes time to get rid of whatever is causing the allergy. So often people move too quickly between foods. How long did you try each one? And did you closely monitor treats and other foods? Are you the only one who feeds the dog?
    I think all dogs can have allergies.

    Cons to goldens include potential for hip issues (my 12.5 year old one has none) and an inability to be a watchdog (they'll hurt no one - not that I think of it as a con).

    Pros: these are just about the best tempered dogs you'll find. There is no better dog if kids will be around (ever). They're friendly, intelligent dogs, and I recommend them highly.
     
  14. Jay42 macrumors 65816

    Jay42

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2005
    #14
    Ah yes, hot spots. Seems like golden retrievers are especially prone, and ours has had them too. We have friends that are big dog people and they swore it was food related. They got us to switch to this fancy dog food made from bison and salmon. Anyway, it didn't help- now she eats Purina again.

    Cortisone seemed to help, but probably not a great solution long term and she would still lick at her hot spots. Basically we have not found a permanent solution although the problem is not as bad as it used to be.

    One question, are your dogs(s) big swimmers?
     
  15. 66217 thread starter Guest

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2006
    #15
    Goldens seem to be more prone to allergies than other dogs.

    But still, they are adorable.

    I'm not sure what I'll do when Roco (my dogs name, just as my nickname) dies. It seems that a hot climate is not the best for these dogs.

    But in general, goldens are the best company dogs. They are playful, they would never bite anyone (so no problem if you have kids around), and they are also very smart and willing to obey you.
     
  16. MacNut macrumors Core

    MacNut

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2002
    Location:
    CT
    #16
    My dog died 6 months ago and I have always had a thing for goldens, they are so well tempered and graceful. What is the average life span, My Gordon Setter lived to be 15.
     
  17. 66217 thread starter Guest

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2006
    #17
    Nope, and normally they are dry.

    Cortisone helps with my dog, since he stops licking and scratching, but as you say, it is not a good long term solution.
     
  18. 66217 thread starter Guest

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2006
    #18
    It is about 12-13 years.

    You won't regret getting a golden.
     
  19. AliensAreFuzzy macrumors 68000

    AliensAreFuzzy

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    May 30, 2004
    Location:
    Madison, WI
    #19
    Well we've got a golden going on about 15 years. He had some hot spots a long while back but I can't for the life of me remember what we did to treat them.
     
  20. MacNut macrumors Core

    MacNut

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    Jan 4, 2002
    Location:
    CT
    #20
    I seem to remember someone say salt water from an ocean swim will help.
     
  21. 66217 thread starter Guest

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2006
    #21
    Yes we tried for a long time. And he only gets hot spots for around 4-5 months of the year. One year he only had one hot spot.

    I am the only one that feeds him. Especially while we where trying different foods, I would tell anyone who entered the house not to give anything to the dog.
     
  22. 66217 thread starter Guest

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    Jan 30, 2006
    #22
    Maybe it would dry up the hot spot, because of the salt.

    But just imagining how much he would suffer when salt touches the cut makes me not wanting to do that.
     
  23. 66217 thread starter Guest

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2006
    #23
    Sometimes the hot spot is not caused by allergies. So they are not re-current.

    Since they have long hair, if you bath them and don't dry the afterwards they can develop hot spots. In fact, anything that makes him want to scratch would develop a hot spot. That why it is so difficult to prevent them if the dog has an allergy.
     
  24. pilotError macrumors 68020

    pilotError

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2006
    Location:
    Long Island
    #24
    My Golden never had an issue.

    My Sister-in-Law's Labrador has a very long list of issues, so its really pot luck.
     
  25. lancestraz macrumors 6502a

    lancestraz

    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2005
    Location:
    RI
    #25
    Since Golden Retrievers are such popular dogs, I wonder if some of theses allergies are related to less than stellar breeding.
    I'm sure you all got your dogs from reputable breeders, but I just thought I'd throw it out there anyway.

    I had a Basset Hound that didn't come from very good breeding and had a lot of seemingly random skin related problems with her.
     

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