Good, inexpensive stylus for Mini 4 (pink, blue)

G-Ziss

macrumors regular
Original poster
Sep 11, 2014
192
0
I need 2 styluses (styli?) that will work well on an iPad Mini 4. Preferably available in different colors as I'm hoping to get one pink and one blue.

I was looking at some multipacks on Amazon (see example below) but I'm wary because you get so many for so little money so I wonder about the quality. I'm thinking I may be better off getting one good one than 20 bad ones for the same price.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00URU6GY2/

Can someone recommend me a good one that is guaranteed to work well on an iPad Mini 4 screen? I'm hoping not to spend more than $10 each.
 

strawberryshortcake

macrumors regular
Oct 24, 2017
102
55
Bay Area, California
Have you considered simply grabbing a couple down at the dollar tree? They all pretty much work the same. My only suggestion would be grabbing one at the dollar store because every generic branded stylus that I've tried all worked the same. One really is no better than another. The ipad mini uses capacitive touch screen technology and all cheap stylus works by taking advantage of that aspect.

If you want something more precise and more accurate, run a search for "precision stylus." Read the amazon reviews on these. Comes in various brands, but they pretty much work on the same principle. There's a flat circular disc attach to the end of a tip. This circular piece is transparent and is important to the design of precision stylus because they allow you to see exactly where the lines are coming from compare to those big black nubs on the generic ones.

DIY side note: If aesthetics isn't much of a concern you can either use any battery (double A, triple A, whatever) and that'll work. Or you can make a DIY stylus using a potato chip bag, anti-static bag that comes packaged with electronic hard drives, chocolate wrapper, or aluminum foil. Watch a couple youtube videos on DIY stylus. There are two DIY methods, "wet" stylus and the other, "dry" stylus. The wet stylus requires having a moist tip, so you'll always need a source of water. The dry stylus is the better route.

Example:
Some of his examples could have been further modified to work like bending the paper clip or aluminum foil at a certain angle.
 
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G-Ziss

macrumors regular
Original poster
Sep 11, 2014
192
0
Thanks for the advice about the mini touch screen. I don't know a lot about it, but it sounds like any stylus would work with it. I was hesitant because I used a stylus on a different model once and it barely worked at all.
 

strawberryshortcake

macrumors regular
Oct 24, 2017
102
55
Bay Area, California
Thanks for the advice about the mini touch screen. I don't know a lot about it, but it sounds like any stylus would work with it. I was hesitant because I used a stylus on a different model once and it barely worked at all.
Maybe there truly are exception because reading through the reviews to your link, some individuals mention that it didn't work on apple products for one or two individuals. Which is why I'd probably drop by your local dollar tree or 99 cents only store and grab a stylus.

Do you recall what tablet model that was and the make up of the stylus? Did the stylus have a black nub at the end?


https://itstillworks.com/kind-screen-ipads-touch-screen-18306.html
"
Capacitive Touch Screens
Early touch screens relied on pressure, forcing users to depress the screen to connect two layers of conductive material to signal a touch. Capacitive screens work by constantly monitoring the electrical field of the screen. Since your body conducts electricity, touching the screen alters this field, and the system can detect that change and use it to determine where you touched. The iPad screen also features multi-touch technology, which allows the system to interpret multiple contacts, such as those when you zoom pictures by pinching or moving your fingers apart."