Good news for Premiere users with a nMP!

Discussion in 'Mac Pro' started by liscio, Jan 9, 2014.

  1. liscio macrumors newbie

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    Waterloo, ON
    #1
  2. jasonvp macrumors 6502a

    jasonvp

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    #2
    All that means is that you don't have to delete the opencl_supported_cards.txt file from the Premiere Pro and AME installation directories. BFD really...
     
  3. Spinland macrumors 6502

    Spinland

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    Utica, NY, USA
    #3
    In my case, I upgraded to CS6 while I still could because I will not get roped into renting my software while I have alternatives. Hopefully deleting the referenced file will garner me some benefit when my nMP arrives.
     
  4. jasonvp macrumors 6502a

    jasonvp

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    #4
    It'll use one of the GPUs, sure. Not both of them.
     
  5. Spinland macrumors 6502

    Spinland

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    #5
    Cool. In any case the nMP is going to be a helluva lot faster than the Mini Server I've been working with. Every bit will help, though. :D
     
  6. liscio thread starter macrumors newbie

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    #6
    You do realize that you can't just throw OpenCL kernels onto every GPU and expect them to work perfectly, do you? Just because it worked, doesn't mean it was going to work properly in every situation.

    I recently encountered an editor that had edited this .txt file and his renders were all getting corrupted without him noticing. Once I caught it and he disabled the hack and all was well.

    But, hey. If you want to play fast & loose with this stuff, go nuts—it's only lost billable time for you.
     
  7. jasonvp macrumors 6502a

    jasonvp

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    #7
    Um. Huh? Would you like to clarify what you mean by that?

    There was something else at play there, I'm certain of it. There is a huge list of folks that have edited (or deleted) the supported_cards.txt file and have had no issues whatsoever. All the text file is is a whitelist of cards Adobe has actually tested. That's it. There's no extra code in the application to go along with it.
     
  8. liscio thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Waterloo, ON
    #8
    I mean that OpenCL isn't the wonderful "write once target anywhere" programming interface it was sold as. Each card has quirks in processing just as they do in OpenGL (some w/ certain extensions, others with different extensions.)

    When targeting OpenCL, it might work out that adding a new card is as simple as throwing the kernel onto it, but in reality there is often some additional testing required to feel confident that you can ship the kernel to run on the GPU. Could be some weird floating point issues, accuracy, etc, etc.

    Sure, I expect that it will work for lots of people and it might work for _most_ cases, but it's still playing with fire. There are so many little differences between GPUs (and large difference when comparing AMD vs nVidia) that could slip through the cracks and cause subtle errors.

    Again, the issues I spoke of manifested as encoding artifacts in the final transcoded product. It was a few frames of garbage every 30s or so. Easy to miss, and it never showed up while in Premiere. Only in the final h.264 encode.
     

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