Google Adds Morse Code Accessibility Feature to Gboard on iOS

Discussion in 'iOS Blog Discussion' started by MacRumors, Jul 12, 2018.

  1. MacRumors macrumors bot

    MacRumors

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    [​IMG]


    Google has added support for Morse code typing to its Gboard app for iOS, providing an accessible method of digital communication for people with disabilities.

    The customizable feature replaces the letters of the keyboard with large dot and dash keys to enter text, and offers text-to-Morse sequences to the auto-suggestion strip above the keyboard.

    [​IMG]

    Google has also launched a Morse Typing Trainer web game that teachers users how to communicate in Morse code using Gboard.

    Tania Finlayson, an assistive tech developer with cerebral palsy who works on the Gboard project, explained in a Google blog post how Morse code has helped her communicate more effectively:
    For existing Gboard users, the Morse code feature is delivered in an update (version 1.29). Gboard is a free download for iPhone available on the App Store. [Direct Link]

    Article Link: Google Adds Morse Code Accessibility Feature to Gboard on iOS
     
  2. verniesgarden macrumors 65816

    verniesgarden

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    #2
    Wasn’t this one of their April fools jokes a few years back?
     
  3. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

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    #3
    Why?

    What does morse code offer you in 2018?
     
  4. Morgenland, Jul 12, 2018
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2018

    Morgenland macrumors 6502

    Morgenland

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    #4
    No real news, Google is wasting money and human resources on nonsense.
    Google's wealth of ideas is in the end.
    Less than fractions of a promille of mankind can recode Morse.

    morse1941.jpg
     
  5. techweenie1 macrumors newbie

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    #5
    I was thinking this at first as well, but then I read "an assistive tech developer with cerebral palsy." It's pretty cool that something invented so long ago can be repurposed to help those with limited motor control or range of motion to communicate today as well. Sure, there's voice recognition, but it's just not quite there yet to be able to know the context in which you're thinking, this offers more control.
     
  6. jonnysods macrumors 603

    jonnysods

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    #6
    This is silly, but kind of fun.

    Also I don't know anyone who knows Morse code. Now google will come out with a Morse code translator.
     
  7. WBRacing macrumors 6502a

    WBRacing

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    #7
    There is also a hard core of radio society enthusiasts who like to use it. Not my thing personally, but great for people to have a choice.
     
  8. oldmacs macrumors 68040

    oldmacs

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    #8
    Morse has accessibility applications. More useful then Apple pushing money into TV shows.
     
  9. Elijen macrumors 6502

    Elijen

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    #9
    I find it pretty cool. You never know where Morse code can save your life. Not useful for daily life though.
     
  10. BuffaloTF macrumors 6502a

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    #11
    welp... now's my chance to show off the full breadth of my Morse code skills, which didn't necessitate the need for an entire keyboard... here it is:

    ...---...
     
  11. charlyham macrumors regular

    charlyham

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    #12
    I hear they are also working on a smoke signal keyboard
     
  12. Inkling macrumors member

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    #14
    J. R. R. Tolkien called it "chronological snobbery." It's the idea that something old can't be a good as something new. But for a number of applications, there's nothing new that beats Morse. It works when all other means fail. If you can turn something on and off, say a light, you can send with Morse. And if your mobility is limited, Morse will work even if all you can do is twitch a finger, puff your breath, or blink an eye. It's also brilliantly designed to maximize efficiency. The more common letters have the shortest length. "E" is a dot. "T" is a dash.

    Even the fact that only a few people now know it is a plus. In most situations, ordinary Morse is invisible and meaningless to them. You saw that in the movie "Independence Day." The space aliens knew nothing about it.

     
  13. TheWatchfulOne macrumors 6502

    TheWatchfulOne

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    Would that be a Samsung Galaxy exclusive?;)
     
  14. ILikeAllOS macrumors 6502

    ILikeAllOS

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