Google Map Scale ?

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by NStocks, Mar 12, 2010.

  1. NStocks macrumors 65816

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    #1
    Hi,

    On google Maps ( or bing ) there is a scale bar at the bottom right corner that states the current zoom in feet and metres. How can I work out what it is to a actual scale?

    For example 1:100, 1:500, 1:1000, 1:2000... I'm studying Architecture and we need to say what scale the Map is not but no use a scale bar.

    Thank You !

    Nathan
     

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  2. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

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    #2
    I'm not sure if you're looking for the Captain Obvious answer here, but...

    When you take the map, scale it to whatever size you want it, and put it into whatever format you want it to be shown (i.e., lay it out on a printed page, or figure out how big it will be on the screen on which the map will be viewed), then you just measure the size of the scale bar and divide.

    For instance, if the scale bar is 2cm long, and it represents 1000m, then the scale is 1:50,000 (because there are 100,000 cm in 1000m).

    The problem with this, of course, is that if you make a powerpoint presentation (for instance), then the scale is different on your computer screen than it is on the projection screen, by a fairly large amount.
     
  3. miles01110 macrumors Core

    miles01110

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    #3
    But what's an order of magnitude between friends????
     
  4. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

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    #4
    10? :confused: :p
     
  5. NStocks thread starter macrumors 65816

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    #5
    I see. In your example would the scale really be 1:50,000 ? I just printed my page and the bar is 25 Metres and is measures at 2cm. What would this be ? ( just to check my answer please )

    Thank You

    EDIT: My map is shows at 1:1250 which corresponds to a book I have which lists typical scale ratio's. 25(m)/2(cm) = 12.5 x 10 = 1250.

    From the reference book :

    1:100 - Building plans/layouts
    1:500 - Site Plans/building Layouts
    1:1000 - Urban scale for site location plans
    1:1250 - Site Plans
    1:2500 - City Plans.

    At least I think this is correct...
     
  6. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

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    #6
    25m = 25*100 cm = 2500 cm, so it would be 1:1250, unless I'm really suffering from sleep deprivation (which is possible!). :)

    EDIT: Right... if you think about it that way, 25m is, what, close to the width of a typical North American house (or bigger)? And it's being squeezed into a size that's a little wider than your fingertip. So it'd work for site plans, but not for building plans.

    Again, though, remember, if you print it out, you want to measure it on paper (or in software that accurately displays the printed page), because it might be different.
     
  7. arkitect macrumors 601

    arkitect

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    #7
    I would say you are correct. ;)

    Kids these days, eh?
    Calculators and computers and still not a clue about the basics…
    In my day as a student we only had slide rules.
    [​IMG]
    OP, just joking. ;) (kind of)
     
  8. NStocks thread starter macrumors 65816

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    #8
    Well I'm just going by what the book states:

    Attached are two images, one with the ruler and scale bar, the other with the map printer on A3 paper with a 30cm ruler next to it. And the screenshot I've used ( but as a Ariel map so you can see houses etc. )


    Can you work it out please. :D
     

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  9. NStocks thread starter macrumors 65816

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    #9
    Ariel Map
     

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  10. arkitect macrumors 601

    arkitect

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    #10
    So…

    Going by your pic you have 20mm = 25m. (or if you want to split hairs at that scale, 19mm = 25m)

    There are (as Mkrishnan pointed out second post) 1000mm/m (100cm/m)…

    And the rest is basic maths.
    The answer was already given in the posts above — 1:1250.

    PS. Is maths still a requirement for admission these days?
     
  11. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

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    #11
    You've got the idea, now.

    P.S., Ariel is a name -- of a moon of Uranus, a city somewhere, one of the Angels, and the Little Mermaid. Arial is a font. Aerial is the word that can mean "seen from the sky, looking down." :D
     
  12. NStocks thread starter macrumors 65816

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    #12
    Are good eyes required for posting a correct reply on this thread ?

    As I stated earlier, I worked it out to be 1:1250...taken from your quote, you are actually referring to my answer.

    To answer your question: Maths are not the main requirement these days, the most math I've done so far is calculating u-Values and general building measurements...

    Thank You
     
  13. NStocks thread starter macrumors 65816

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    #13
    I was in a rush and I need food !

    Thank You
     
  14. arkitect macrumors 601

    arkitect

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    #14
    So why did you ask this?
    ;)
    Edit:
    Ahh, I see.
     
  15. NStocks thread starter macrumors 65816

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    #15
    Because I was quoted incorrectly so I asked other posters to clarify my answer.

    We use very, very good programs that can calculate most of the math for us, in the 21st Century we are more focused on Design considerations and constraints that can help to get the project come along in a timely manner and within budget, not looking at google maps to work out scales normally ( coming from a 1st year student who has been studying ' Architecture ' for 6 months. ' Architecture ' because we have only recently studied actual buildings...

    I'm only human AKA I make mistakes AKA I'm new to this area and learning ( not basic math ! ) Give me a break ( just joking, kind of )
     
  16. arkitect macrumors 601

    arkitect

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    #16
    Interesting that…
    What, if I may ask, were your courses so far?

    PS. Even back in my day we were interested in
    .
    All those caves were easy… but once we made the leap to that damned Primitive Hut things got really nasty.
    ;)
     
  17. NStocks thread starter macrumors 65816

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    #17
    When we started we just designed a shelter ( tent basically ). We are now slowly learning about building structures... Ahh Primitive Hut, I guess those History and Theory of Architecture lectures will pay off eventually !

    Thank You, Good Bye.
     
  18. samiwas macrumors 65816

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    #18
    Wow, really? Knowing basic math isn't a requirement for Architecture because programs can do it for you?? Wow. :confused: I hope you don't ever have to do any design work on the spot without your trusty computer sitting next to you.
     
  19. NStocks thread starter macrumors 65816

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    #19
    Knowing ' basic ' math is required, however you are not required to have a masters in Mathematics for example. Of course if you can't work out calculations then you will fail. I happen to have a grade B in math ( GCSE ) which doesn't mean much now but it proves I can work out math calculations. Figuring out the scale of a google map doesn't have much to do with maths, more to do with how the scale bar is re-interpreted as a scale factor, not bar. I asked for the answer to be clarified because the fist answer ( and example ) were incorrect: you don't have site maps on a scale of 1:50,000. City maps are generally shown at 1:2500, so 1:50,000 is like a world map ! ( don't hold me to that, it was just to make a point )
     
  20. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

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    #20
    Now you're getting obnoxious. First, this is mathematics that we generally expect 12-year-olds to be able to correctly do on their own. Second, the example wasn't incorrect. I didn't say that you had architectural plans that were drawn to a 1:50k scale. I said that, if you had a Google Map with the dimensions I provided (which is not at all unlikely), then it would have a 1:50k scale.

    You asked a question that any college student should be able to solve on their own, and we provided you with detailed help and explanations. There's no need for you to respond with ungratefulness and be rude to us in return.
     
  21. NStocks thread starter macrumors 65816

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    #21
    No I'm not being obnoxious or ungrateful

    12 year olds don't need to know a scale factor of a map let alone if they know what one is. I should have written my last reply better, you were not incorrect at all end of. Now your comparing a student at Uni to a 12 year old, is that not de-grading at all?

    I appreciate you help, I'm sure I said ' thank you ' on every thread I've made on this forum ( and others ), but when another member just randomly joins in to mock/pick at the OP, surely that calls for some sort of ' aggression '.

    If the other poster(s) read the thread correctly, I wouldn't have needed to ask for clarification which started this ' aggression ' as you kindly said ' Now I'm getting it ' which is what anyone like to hear.

    At the end of the day, you provided me with the answer, I was told I was wrong by being incorrectly quoted by a different member because they didn't read the thread correctly, not to be rude but how is that different to me asking for a basic math question to be clarified in terms of basics ?

    ^ Rhetorical question, I appreciate your help and thank you I do not wish to argue with people on a forum, there's enough of that out in the real world.
     

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