Google report says silent updates boosts browser security

Discussion in 'Apple, Inc and Tech Industry' started by clevin, May 6, 2009.

  1. clevin macrumors G3

    clevin

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2006
    #1
    http://www.thetechherald.com/articl...-Using-silent-updates-boosts-browser-security

    according to google's count

    of course, googel Chrome
    Pros and cons, decide for yourself.
     
  2. benthewraith macrumors 68040

    benthewraith

    Joined:
    May 27, 2006
    Location:
    Miami, FL
    #2
    Seems very easily exploitable. And also, Google really doesn't have any business installing and/or updating software without my consent...
     
  3. Diseal3 macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2008
    #3
    I would at least like to be notified that google is doing this rather then raping my machine.
     
  4. Abstract macrumors Penryn

    Abstract

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2002
    Location:
    Location Location Location
    #4
    This information isn't very meaningful.

    People who bother to download and use Google Chrome are more likely to be tech freaks anyway. It's like saying more Windows 7 beta testers were into technology than the average home user. Well duh.

    Some may argue that Firefox users are the same, except that's not really true. FF is far more mainstream, and some people have adopted FF simply because they read an article in the newspaper or magazine about the advantages of Firefox. Even my stepdad uses Firefox. He heard that it was supposed to be better, although he doesn't really know why (nor does he care).

    The only surprise is Opera being so far down the list. I'm not surprised by the slow rate of updates by Safari users.
     
  5. clevin thread starter macrumors G3

    clevin

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2006
    #5
    although you have a point there, I don't think what you mentioned is a significant reason for the number.

    You have to assume that tech savy users do update themselves very diligently. Which may be true to a certain degree, but I doubt that can cover everybody.

    I do think silent update is a major reason for chrome users using most up to date browser. But Its strange to see that chrome is not doing 100%, if the silent update is compulsory and non-negotiable.

    Plus, I think firefox is doing it as best it can within reasonable boundary, it allow users to disable auto updates, and it always remind users about the update. Google is stepping across the boundary a bit. I'm not sure people will be comfortable with it, I know I am not.
     
  6. MikhailT macrumors 601

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2007
    #6
    not strange, more surprised its 97%. The reason it wouldn't be strange is that some people don't use chrome daily and may have stopped using it. Or uses Chrome just for site testing and don't open it all the time.
     
  7. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2004
    Location:
    Grand Rapids, MI, USA
    #7
    Is it perhaps because of users who infrequently run their copies but happen to be running it on the day of checking? And/or, how does Chrome deal with administrative privileges?

    Granted presumably hardly any managed installations probably have Google Chrome on them, one of my biggest annoyances with the rapid stream of updates (speaking of culprits, why on Earth does Acrobat seemingly need to install an update every other week or so?) is using automatic updaters that seem to have no concept of user privileges. So I am constantly getting annoying pop-ups from Acrobat for upgrades I cannot install on my work PC and which my IT department for whatever reason has not deigned to roll out.

    So here is kind of a tough one for me... does Google Chrome allow automatic updating of code from non-administrative accounts (in whatever OS... e.g. without needing to log in as an administrator in Windows, without needing to provide admin authentication in OS X, without needing to provide a sudo password in Linux, etc)? If so, that seems like it will not fly well with managed installations. If not, then it won't maintain that 97% when it hits a broader class of PCs, anyway.
     

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