Got a 24-70L

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Cabbit, Jun 19, 2011.

  1. Cabbit macrumors 68020

    Cabbit

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2006
    Location:
    Scotland
    #1
    Super happy fun day, i got a Canon 24-70 L yesterday for my Canon 550D and well it is fantastic however front heavy for my poor little 550D. I tried out a battery grip in the store and that replaced balance so next on my list.

    Right now i am using a Jessops 77mm UV filter to protect the front element, whats the best filter i can get that will not impact image quality majority and provide protection from bumps and scratches.
     
  2. flosseR macrumors 6502a

    flosseR

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    Jan 1, 2009
    Location:
    the cold dark north
    #2
    That would be a B & W UV Filter. I use one on each of my lenses and it does not cause additional ghosts or flares.
    Congrats on the L glass.. bear in mind that those B & W filters cost a small fortune but that is for a reason...
     
  3. jborko macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2011
    #3
    I second B+W UV MRC... I have it on my lens since the first day (I ordered it together with the lens as a matter of fact. It does cost a fortune (for a filter) but hey, you bought yourself currently best standard zoom lens and you wouldn't want to spoil image quality with some cheap filter....
     
  4. jabbott macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2009
    #5
    I also shoot with a 550D and 24-70mm f/2.8L and I actually prefer the front-heaviness. I just carry it by holding the lens with my left hand and then controlling the shutter and settings on the body with my right hand. Same goes for using the 70-200mm f/2.8L. If I need to adjust zoom or manual focus, I'll just adjust my left hand to hold the lens there. The only time I hold the camera body predominantly is when using a 50mm or 10-22mm. This has worked well for me 12,000+ shots in but YMMV.

    BTW, Hoya HMC UV-0 filters got ranked higher than B+W here:
    http://www.lenstip.com/113.4-article-UV_filters_test_Description_of_the_results_and_summary.html
     
  5. flosseR macrumors 6502a

    flosseR

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    Jan 1, 2009
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    the cold dark north
    #6
    regarding the hoya and B & W test: The problem that I have experienced in the past with hoya and all the others is that there is a huge sample variation. I mean that some UV filters are great from hoya and then I have had some that just are absolute garbage and generate a huge amount of flare. I have not encountered that sample variation with B & W. Then again your situation might be different.
    //f
     
  6. jabbott macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2009
    #7
    I sometimes get flaring with my 50mm f/1.4 when at max aperture while using a Hoya UV-C (compact) filter... other than that, I've had no issues with Hoya HMC Super UV(0) filters. The closest thing to an issue I've experienced is that the lens cap doesn't fit on as snugly, but it still stays on nicely enough.
     
  7. Cabbit thread starter macrumors 68020

    Cabbit

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2006
    Location:
    Scotland
    #8
    Hmm b & w looks good but i always here good things about hoya, though it really has to be the best filter possible regardless of price. I want to take full advantage of my L glass and to that i've got a few more books about better understanding exposure and composition as well.

    Its a very powerful lens for a amateur such as myself but with a lot of practice i think this will be my main lens for many many years to come especially for scenes of harbours and little things here and there i love taking pictures of.

    First sample shot of some poor kids wee cute hat, must have put it on the building works thing and forgot about it.
    [​IMG]
     
  8. VirtualRain macrumors 603

    VirtualRain

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2008
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC
    #9
    Congrats! Nice piece of glass.... Did you consider the EFS 17-55 IS as welll? What swayed you towards the L?

    As for protection, I dont know what kind of conditions you're shooting in, but how about just using the hood when shooting and the lens cap when not shooting?

    If you really want a filter, I highly recommend this HK reseller... Great selection and prices if you can wait 10 days for shipping. I've purchased a few things from them and been very happy.

    http://maxsaver.net/
     
  9. FX120 macrumors 65816

    FX120

    Joined:
    May 18, 2007
    #10
    IMO just forget the whole concept of using a UV filter to "protect" the front element. I swear that whole thing was just made up by camera store salesmen looking to pad their margins by leading consumers to purchase high price filters.
     
  10. Cabbit thread starter macrumors 68020

    Cabbit

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2006
    Location:
    Scotland
    #11
    I want to move onto full frame next year, and reviews of the 24-70L put it as one of the best lens with the 70-200 2.8 II.

    I live in north Scotland i don't want dirt, dust, and sand getting in the lens when its shooting into me in the wind.
     
  11. jabbott macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2009
    #12
    For the last lens I sold, I never used a filter on it and it got nicked on the front lens element as a result. Despite it being in perfect shape otherwise, it sold for about $100 less than market value. I could have paid $30 to put a good 58mm UV filter on it which would have prevented this altogether. The amount of light transmitted by a good UV filter is >97% so I'd rather sacrifice a little light to have a pristine front lens element and ensure high resale value.
     
  12. FX120, Jun 20, 2011
    Last edited: Jun 20, 2011

    FX120 macrumors 65816

    FX120

    Joined:
    May 18, 2007
    #13
    It's not the transmission, it's refraction. Cheap filters are horrible and will seriously degrade the lenses IQ. If you're buying expensive UV filters that degrade IQ less and you damage one of those, you're out that same $100 or more.

    There are a few limited applications where a UV filter is actually applicable. Just leaving it in front of your lens all the time is not one of them unless you enjoy wasting money on expensive lenses that will never see their full potential.

    http://www.lensrentals.com/blog/2011/06/good-times-with-bad-filters
    http://www.kenandchristine.com/gallery/1054387_ucZqa/1
     
  13. designguy79 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2009
    Location:
    Michigan
    #14
    Awesome choice! By far my favorite lens, and rarely leaves my 5D Mk II unless I am doing a 360.

    I am saving up for the 70-200 -- its going to clean out my account! :eek:
     
  14. Cabbit thread starter macrumors 68020

    Cabbit

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2006
    Location:
    Scotland
    #15
    Seems hard to decide now, i really dinny want such a wonderful peace of glass being broken but i also want the best image possible.
     
  15. runlsd macrumors 6502

    runlsd

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    Mar 17, 2009
    #16
    congrats! don't you love the feeling of getting new glass? too bad it doesn't happen very often.
     
  16. VirtualRain macrumors 603

    VirtualRain

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2008
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC
    #17
    I think the reasonable thing to do, is to have a filter on hand... but not keep it glued to the lens permanently. If you're shooting in harsh conditions where you may be subject to sea spray, dust storms, flying debris, etc... then use your filter. Otherwise stow it and let the lens see things without any interference.

    You can always keep your front element safe from scratches, scuffs, and even rain by using the lens hood... and no lens has a better hood system than the 24-70. Furthermore, nothing is better than protecting your lens when it's not in use than a good old lens cap. Get a pinch lens cap to make using the hood easier and removing/applying the lens cap more convenient so you're actually using it.
     
  17. Cabbit thread starter macrumors 68020

    Cabbit

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    Jan 30, 2006
    Location:
    Scotland
    #18
    It is a lovely feeling, so far i have went from a 18-55 to a 50mm 1.8 then to a 28-105 USM which i loved, now moving onto the L glass i am smitten.

    As i have only had my camera since November i know i can't use my glass to the best of its abilities yet as i am still learning my craft, though now i know that the results i get are down to my fault and not limitations of the lens.
     
  18. jabbott macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2009
    #19
    From the two articles you posted:

    "This is a negligibly lighter tone than without the filter, but for what it is worth we can say we lost a smidgen of contrast. One would be hard pressed to see the difference." - Ken & Christine, referring to the Hoya Super-HMC UV filter

    "...and certainly lends credit to the idea that a high quality, multicoated UV filter has little effect on image quality." - Roger Cicala​

    Unlike Roger at Lens Rentals, I'm not stacking 5 (or 50!) UV filters onto my lenses. :D

    To the original poster, perhaps you could get a decent UV filter and try the lens with and without it. You could compare the difference between equally framed/exposed test shots (using manual mode, manual focus, delayed shutter and a tripod to ensure consistency between shots). Add in some comparisons that include potential flaring. Then balance those results against the desire to protect your front of your lens. That way your decision is based on your own experience and not someone else's opinion. If you find that the filter doesn't meet or exceed your expectations within the return period, you could return it and/or try a different one.
     
  19. Ish macrumors 68010

    Ish

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    Nov 30, 2004
    Location:
    UK
    #20
    It is a good lens, but the extra weight over the 24–105L on the 5D Mark II was the straw that broke the camel's back for me, so to speak, and I went for the lighter one.
     
  20. Cabbit thread starter macrumors 68020

    Cabbit

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2006
    Location:
    Scotland
    #21
    Just got myself a new bag and a jessops carbon fibre tripod. This one is very nice and sturdy and seems quite capable.

    I also got a hoya circular polarising filter which i have tired cheeper filters of this type on my old lens on water and vegetation to great effect.
     
  21. Cabbit thread starter macrumors 68020

    Cabbit

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2006
    Location:
    Scotland
    #22
    http://cabbit.co.uk/_MG_1393.jpg heres a not to inspireing picture of my sofa just to show of the image quality, there is no sharping or colour correction applied and it was done on my new tripod with the shutter up firsts of course.
     
  22. xMClass macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2011
    Location:
    California
    #23
    Couldn't agree more.

    To the OP:

    I'd rather save the money on something else rather than putting another piece of glass in front of that lens. I never use filters on any of my lenses (including a 24-70) and not a single one has gotten a scratch or has even come close to being scratched. If you want protection, use the lens hood. I would use the lens hood anyway but I see way too many people using lenses without a hood then complain when they get a tiny mark on their lens. The front elements on these things, especially with L series lenses, are a lot tougher than most people think.
     

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