GPU fail... Time to upgrade to Retina??

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by donny88, Feb 5, 2015.

  1. donny88 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2015
    #1
    OK I am completely, hopelessly stuck on the fence on this one.

    A few months ago I upgraded my 2011 i7 2.0ghz quadcore MBP, replacing the optical with a 128gb SSD and buying 8gb of 1333mhz ram (about $250). The upgrade was a wicked success and the mac ran at a blistering pace.
    A couple of weeks ago I finally experienced the GPU failure that plague 2011 MBP's. It was bad, the mac wouldn't boot and I needed work files off of it so I had to shell out $250 for a guy just to reflow the GPU (labour is expensive in Aus).

    Now I understand that reflowing isn't a permanent solution, I'm running gfxcardstatus and smcfancontrol which is actually showing her running at much lower temperatures now and I've completely disabled the discrete GPU.
    Im still cautious as to whether it will fail again as suddenly as it did the first time and because I need it for certain work files it makes me really nervous.

    The plan is as its running 100% right now I could quite easily throw it up on Ebay, looking at sold items MBP that are the same model with similar upgrades go for between $1000-1500. Therefore I could cut my losses on this one and with maybe a little added put it directly into a brand new 13" MBP retina 128gb ($1500) which I could actually benefit from the increased portability.

    That way I would no longer have this one as a liability and have something that will last a minimum of 3 more years. I have a 1Tb usb 3.0 hard drive which I would use to store larger files.

    MAIN Q's

    1 - Would I see a significant performance change going from ivy bridge i7 quadcore to i5 haswell dualcore? I dont use any graphics intense apps (just logic pro and office)

    2 - If I continue to run my current setup with the discrete GPU disabled and monitoring the temp... What are the chances of having a relapse? 4yr old technology makes me edgy.

    Upgrade or not?

    Thanks dudes
     
  2. yjchua95 macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2011
    Location:
    GVA, KUL, MEL (current), ZQN
    #2
    Currently you've a Sandy Bridge quad core. Ivy Bridge is mid-2012.

    A Haswell dual-core is much less powerful.

    If you continue your current setup, it'll still fail, because the heat from the CPU will affect the GPU's solder joints as well (they're in the same area) and when the solder fails, it won't boot at all.

    Logic Pro is multithreaded. I'd recommend a baseline 15" rMBP instead.
     
  3. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 3, 2009
    Location:
    Boston
    #3
    I wonder if you'll see a bit of a performance hit with Logic Pro, because of the quad vs dual core difference. I think overall for most usages, you'll see a performance increase on going to a Haswell based computer. The issue is any apps that you use that are taking advantage of 4 cores now.

    That's a tough one. I think you may last a few more years but its impossible to say, I think you're doing all the right things to keep it cool, but in the end the writing is on the wall.

    If it were me, I'd sell it on ebay and look for a newer model.
     
  4. donny88 thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2015
    #4
    thanks for your input guys!

    My main concern is reliability over performance, my dad runs the baseline rMBP on logic and its still quick for most tasks.

    yjchua95: So you're saying the discrete GPU can still fail even if I move the drivers so the computer boots/runs permanently with integrated GPU? Thought it wouldnt have mattered if the solder melted if the GPU isnt being used.

    Cheers
     
  5. cambookpro macrumors 603

    cambookpro

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2010
    Location:
    United Kingdom
    #5
    I've run FCP X and Motion side-by-side with a base 13" rMBP and a 2.2GHz quad i7 MBP from 2011. Not really any discernible difference. Both played the same 30 minute 1080p project fine, and both started stuttering halfway through a 120 layer Motion project. It renders video slightly slower, but then again exports video slightly faster, probably due to the really fast write speeds.

    Difference in GPU performance of the Radeon 6750M vs the Iris in the 13" rMBP isn't massive. The 6750M is very slightly faster, but since yours is on the way out I guess that comparison doesn't really matter.

    Essentially, in real world use, they hardly feel any different. The rMBP is also much quicker opening files, copying files due to the SSD, so in most use cases it actually feels quicker.
     
  6. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 3, 2009
    Location:
    Boston
    #6
    For what I know it fails because of heat and the type of solder being used. Its lead free and is prone to cracking. The heat accelerates this, so by not using the dGPU and running the fans to keep the laptop cooler you are mitigating the issue, though I think overall it will still fail - its just a case of when. You're probably extending the life by what you're doing. How much, is anyone's guess.

    The dGPU is still used, such as on boot up, or if you hook up the computer to an external display or run windows in bootcamp.
     
  7. yjchua95 macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2011
    Location:
    GVA, KUL, MEL (current), ZQN
    #7
    Yes, I'm saying exactly that. When the solder fails, during startup, the EFI always does a check to determine that all components are online. During startup, if the EFI detects that the dGPU is offline, even if you disabled it, the system won't boot.
     

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