Greenpeace Declares Apple 'Greenest Tech Company' For Third Year Running

MacRumors

macrumors bot
Original poster
Apr 12, 2001
49,668
10,999



Greenpeace has declared Apple to be the most environmentally friendly technology company in the world for the third year in a row.

The conclusion was reached in the environmental organization's latest report, entitled Clicking Clean: Who is Winning the Race to Build a Green Internet, which awarded Apple a final 'A' grade and a clean energy index score of 83 percent. Facebook and Google also scored 'A' grades, with clean energy index scores of 67 and 56 percent respectively.


"Thanks to the leadership and advocacy of companies like Apple, Google, Facebook, and Switch, we are seeing the tech industry make major strides toward powering the internet with clean energy," Gary Cook, Greenpeace's senior IT analyst, said in a statement.
The report ranked companies on a range of green credentials, from energy transparency and renewable procurement to energy efficiency and mitigation. Nevada-based telecoms company Switch, which develops data centers, was the only company in its sector to be awarded grade A's across the board, with a 100 percent clean energy index.

According to the report, Apple "played a catalytic role within its IT supply chain, pushing other IT data center and cloud operators who help deliver pieces of Apple's corner of the internet to follow their lead in powering their operations with renewable energy".

Apple, Google, and Facebook pledged in 2012 to commit to 100 percent renewable energy sources. Apple's new Cupertino campus, which is currently under construction, will run entirely on renewable energy, thanks to an estimated 700,000 square feet of solar panels.

Despite the positives in the tech sector, the report highlighted concerns with regards to emerging East Asian internet companies, which lack access to renewables from monopoly utilities in those regions.

"Without key policy changes, the rapid growth of the internet in East Asia will likely be powered by coal and other dirty sources of electricity," the report stated. According to Greenpeace, the north and southeast Asian region is the world's biggest emitter of CO2.

Article Link: Greenpeace Declares Apple 'Greenest Tech Company' For Third Year Running
 

arkitect

macrumors 603
Sep 5, 2005
5,951
5,733
Bath, United Kingdom
So soldered on components, throw away tech is green?
I agree with you that Apple's latest hardware products are anything but "green", but this report is titled "Clicking Clean: Who is Winning the Race to Build a Green Internet". So things like renewable energy sources etc would be what GreenPeace was looking at.

I wonder how Apple would fare if the report took into account the wastefulness of Apple's "Everything soldered on, throw away when no longer up to scratch" hardware.
 

nt5672

macrumors 68020
Jun 30, 2007
2,075
4,474
Kudos for them, one area they have made a great effort.

Though glued computers which are throwaway is horrible for the environment . My previous macs would have now been at the dump had it not been for their repairability.
Mine too. Political correctness (green movement) is only for show. Being a previous member of several green organizations its obvious to anyone that cares to look that environmental groups are not about the environment anymore, but using the environment as an excuse for reducing freedoms, making money, and implementing some form of Totalitarianism where the rulers are supposedly smarter than us regular folks.
 

Iconoclysm

macrumors 68020
May 13, 2010
2,424
1,674
Washington, DC
So soldered on components, throw away tech is green?
No idea why you would think that makes any difference at all - and you can recycle any of these things at your local Apple store.
[doublepost=1484055236][/doublepost]
If it's using highly recyclable materials? Why not?

What's better? A more expensive device using less material (lighter) but is harder to repair that lasts 5 years or a cheaper device using more material (heavier) is easier to repair but isn't (typically) and last 3 years?
Woah now, let's not start throwing around logic - someone is likely to get hurt. Fact is, their products have been more environmentally friendly than their competition for years too...glue or no glue.
 

mkeeley

macrumors 6502
Sep 18, 2007
444
878
I agree with you that Apple's latest hardware products are anything but "green", but this report is titled "Clicking Clean: Who is Winning the Race to Build a Green Internet". So things like renewable energy sources etc would be what GreenPeace was looking at.

I wonder how Apple would fare if the report took into account the wastefulness of Apple's "Everything soldered on, throw away when no longer up to scratch" hardware.
My mistake.
 

djcerla

macrumors 68000
Apr 23, 2015
1,829
7,653
Italy
The artful spin doctors of MR forum tried (and failed) to turn a completely positive piece of news into crap.

Better luck next time I guess.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Nadir98

69Mustang

macrumors 604
Jan 7, 2014
7,461
14,021
In between a rock and a hard place
If it's using highly recyclable materials? Why not?

What's better? A more expensive device using less material (lighter) but is harder to repair that lasts 5 years or a cheaper device using more material (heavier) is easier to repair but isn't (typically) and last 3 years?
Uh, there are a few things wrong with your quote. Just a few. Chief among them is a conspicuous absence of facts and erroneous corollaries. Less material? Based on what? Gut feeling. Lighter? That has nothing to do with being recyclable. 5 yrs vs 3 yrs? You pulled these numbers from where? Cuz anecdotally, 9% of computers are still running XP so your 3 year lifespan seem a little under estimated.

Woah now, let's not start throwing around logic - someone is likely to get hurt. Fact is, their products have been more environmentally friendly than their competition for years too...glue or no glue.
There's no logic in that quote. You're confusing logic with confirmation bias. They are not the same thing.
 
  • Like
Reactions: MH01

vertical smile

macrumors 603
Sep 23, 2014
5,016
5,974
No idea why you would think that makes any difference at all - and you can recycle any of these things at your local Apple store.
Maybe you missed that the poster used the term "throwaway".

Besides, recyclable or not, it is wasteful regardless.
"Without key policy changes, the rapid growth of the internet in East Asia will likely be powered by coal and other dirty sources of electricity," the report stated. According to Greenpeace, the north and southeast Asian region is the world's biggest emitter of CO2.
I could be wrong, but I think there has been many articles about Apple investing a lot of money in these areas. If Apple uses companies that do not use renewable energy sources, is this counted against them? Or is it not because these assembly plants are not technically Apple.
 

69Mustang

macrumors 604
Jan 7, 2014
7,461
14,021
In between a rock and a hard place
I could be wrong, but I think there has been many articles about Apple investing a lot of money in these areas. If Apple uses companies that do not use renewable energy sources, is this counted against them? Or is it not because these assembly plants are not technically Apple.
Speculation on my behalf, but I think this would count against a company in the "Renewable Procuerment" category. Apple has been pretty good at getting their down chain suppliers to adopt a more environmentally friendly stance.
 
  • Like
Reactions: vertical smile

SBlue1

macrumors 68000
Oct 17, 2008
1,615
1,859
So soldered on components, throw away tech is green?
Thanks to the repairability and upgradability of my previous Mac Cube, white MacBook and my current non retina MacBook Pro I could squeeze the last breath out of these machines. Our planet stayed a little greener because I kept those machines away from the dump a few years longer.

Now the current lineup is the worst there has ever been with Apple. Glue everywhere, one small peace breaker and you throw the complete thing away and so on. Sad.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 0997853

vertical smile

macrumors 603
Sep 23, 2014
5,016
5,974
Apple has been pretty good at getting their down chain suppliers to adopt a more environmentally friendly stance.
If this is true, then this makes sense to me, at least for suppliers.

What about assembly plants? MR has a lot of articles lately about India, I don't know if that would be considered apart of the "Renewable Procurement" category.
 

NoNothing

macrumors 6502
Aug 9, 2003
449
485
Kudos for them, one area they have made a great effort.

Though glued computers which are throwaway is horrible for the environment . My previous macs would have now been at the dump had it not been for their repairability.
If you choose to put them in the dump and not recycle them, that is 100% on you. Given the VAST majority of people don't repair but replace (even when repair is an option), making things highly recyclable is a great thing.
 

5684697

Suspended
Sep 22, 2007
237
907
"...from energy transparency and renewable procurement to energy efficiency and mitigation."

Good grief. Is that not doublespeak writ large? What this really means is that putting Algore on the board was a shrewd move.
 
Register on MacRumors! This sidebar will go away, and you'll see fewer ads.