Group interview with Apple this week for retail any advice?

enthawizeguy

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Jun 10, 2007
321
16
North Hollywood, CA
I have my first group interview / hiring event this week with Apple. Working for apple in any ways is a big deal for me and I am taking this very seriously. If you guys have any experiences, interview questions or tips it would be greatly appreciated. I have done some research already . I am not great in interviews but am an excellent employee and salesman.

Thanks
 

keysofanxiety

macrumors G3
Nov 23, 2011
9,472
24,226
I have my first group interview / hiring event this week with Apple. Working for apple in any ways is a big deal for me and I am taking this very seriously. If you guys have any experiences, interview questions or tips it would be greatly appreciated. I have done some research already . I am not great in interviews but am an excellent employee and salesman.

Thanks
They do a lot of things:

- Typing test with a lot of characters/punctuation, including spelling mistakes that you have to copy letter-for-letter. Brush up on your typing if you haven't already.

- They give you access to the Apple Support website but will ask you a lot of trick questions: e.g., how many USB ports are on the Mac Pro. Other interviewers tend to get confused and go for the MacBook Pro, so thoroughly read the questions and check the Apple Support site. They don't expect you to know things by memory, rather expect you to competantly be able to look for the correct answers at the right place.

- A lot of things regarding email servers, how to setup emails, the difference between POP3/IMAP -- you definitely need to be confident with the differences.
 

sim667

macrumors 65816
Dec 7, 2010
1,365
2,837
They do a lot of things:

- Typing test with a lot of characters/punctuation, including spelling mistakes that you have to copy letter-for-letter. Brush up on your typing if you haven't already.

- They give you access to the Apple Support website but will ask you a lot of trick questions: e.g., how many USB ports are on the Mac Pro. Other interviewers tend to get confused and go for the MacBook Pro, so thoroughly read the questions and check the Apple Support site. They don't expect you to know things by memory, rather expect you to competantly be able to look for the correct answers at the right place.

- A lot of things regarding email servers, how to setup emails, the difference between POP3/IMAP -- you definitely need to be confident with the differences.
Thats changed a bit then, my experience was nothing like that.
 

Scepticalscribe

macrumors Sandy Bridge
Jul 29, 2008
45,573
30,779
The Far Horizon
It may sound screamingly obvious, but dress smartly and be clean and sharp in appearance.

Nobody will expect you to know everything, but they will expect you to be able to know where to go for the answers.
 

Tsuchiya

macrumors 68020
Jun 7, 2008
2,309
367
Contribute to discussions, ask meaningful questions, don't enquire about pay or benefits etc.

It's all about personality and how well you get along with the interviewers and those around you.
 
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enthawizeguy

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Jun 10, 2007
321
16
North Hollywood, CA
It's for retail.... If anyone has any experience with interview questions please give some examples with answers. I am a great fit for the job but I tend not to do well with interviews. This job is really important to me so I am doing my best to prepare and kill it
 

Scepticalscribe

macrumors Sandy Bridge
Jul 29, 2008
45,573
30,779
The Far Horizon
It's for retail.... If anyone has any experience with interview questions please give some examples with answers. I am a great fit for the job but I tend not to do well with interviews. This job is really important to me so I am doing my best to prepare and kill it
But sometimes, with interviews, they are not looking for 'the right answer' (unless they want to know that you know a specific technical answer to a particular technical question); rather, they are looking to see how you deal with being asked questions, and how you respond to that.

They want to see your reaction to stuff: Do you like being asked questions? Can you treat people who haven't a clue about computers and technology with respect instead of being patronising? (Recalling the 1990s, I cannot begin to count the number of smart young guys in computer shops whose default setting was a sneer; however, in fairness, this is an area which has massively improved in recent years).

Can you handle your expertise being challenged robustly? (Some guys can't. They want to correct their interlocutor instead of politely explaining to them why their understanding of something may be incomplete).

Can you answer questions asked in a way that the general public would understand - can you translate technical stuff into words a layperson would understand? A lot of experts and specialists can't - they see the shop floor as an opportunity to show off their expertise.

So, in a interview, ask yourself what are they really looking for - what are they actually asking? The question itself might be secondary to what they are really trying to ascertain. What I am saying is that - in an interview - attitude may well be every bit as important as knowledge.