Guess no Apple Watch at the water park

tl01

macrumors 68020
Original poster
Jun 20, 2010
2,308
606
I'm thinking when I take my kids to the water park tomorrow that I should leave my Apple Watch in the room. The fast water at the end of the slides I assume would be too much for the water resistance right? It is a series 2.
 

Mlrollin91

macrumors G5
Nov 20, 2008
13,476
8,685
Ventura County
I highly doubt you will have a problem with a Series 2 at the water park, considering it is rated for a lot more pressure than just a stream of water. I shower with my Series 0 daily, have never had a problem with a direct stream of water on it. I also take my Series 0 in the pool and hot tub with no issues either.
 

Julien

macrumors G4
Jun 30, 2007
11,137
3,822
Atlanta
I'm thinking when I take my kids to the water park tomorrow that I should leave my Apple Watch in the room. The fast water at the end of the slides I assume would be too much for the water resistance right? It is a series 2.
 

BarracksSi

Suspended
Jul 14, 2015
3,902
2,626
I would probably put a bumper-style case on mine if I took it to a water park. Mine is a Series 0, though; I don't know if there are any bumpers to fit your Series 2 yet.
 

jbachandouris

macrumors 601
Aug 18, 2009
4,477
1,403
Upstate NY
Help me understand. You don't want to take your series 2 Apple Watch, which is actually advertised as water resistant, to the water park? If it is made for swimming, why in the world would you think a water park ride would be dangerous to it?

Even the series 0 could handle a water park (unofficially).

Now, if you're worried about it getting banged up, that's a different story...
 

eXMomoj

macrumors newbie
Sep 23, 2016
23
21
I never understood why people don't take their watches off before they shower. It takes all of 5 seconds to take it off and 5-10 minutes to take a shower. It's not like you're missing anything during that time and you're only unnecessarily exposing your watch to water, shampoo, and soap which will slowly deteriorate the watch and/or band. But hey, its not my watch!
 

OllyW

Moderator
Staff member
Oct 11, 2005
16,747
6,364
The Black Country, England
Help me understand. You don't want to take your series 2 Apple Watch, which is actually advertised as water resistant, to the water park? If it is made for swimming, why in the world would you think a water park ride would be dangerous to it?
You just need to keep it away from any "high-velocity water".

Apple Watch Series 2 has a water resistance rating of 50 metres under ISO standard 22810:2010. This means that it may be used for shallow-water activities like swimming in a pool or ocean. However, Apple Watch Series 2 should not be used for scuba diving, waterskiing or other activities involving high-velocity water or submersion below shallow depth.
 
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Howyalikdemapls

macrumors 6502a
Sep 2, 2013
545
449
It will totally be okay at the water park. Apple says it is not recommended for waterskiing and wakeboarding, but I've heard from people who used their Series 0 wakeboarding all summer long with no problems.

You won't encounter any water at the water park that is as high of velocity as wakeboarding anyways.
 

dyn

macrumors 68030
Aug 8, 2009
2,708
383
.nl
Help me understand. You don't want to take your series 2 Apple Watch, which is actually advertised as water resistant, to the water park? If it is made for swimming, why in the world would you think a water park ride would be dangerous to it?
Because it is tested at a certain pressure in certain circumstances. If we take a look at the IP-rating tests than it comes down to gently put a device on the bottom of a bucket of water that doesn't move around. The longer you are able to do that, the higher the IP-rating number will be.

The pressure they test with is, I think, calculated back to the pressure of water which is something different. That means that a water resistance of 50m means you can swim with it but not dive with it. Apple advertises the watch as having a water resistance of 50m and explicitly clarifies it by stating that you can only swim with it and should never ever dive with it due to the large amounts of force on the watch. Pressurised water used in attractions as waterslides and such are also to be avoided because of the very same reason (they can blow the gaskets).

I never understood why people don't take their watches off before they shower. It takes all of 5 seconds to take it off and 5-10 minutes to take a shower. It's not like you're missing anything during that time and you're only unnecessarily exposing your watch to water, shampoo, and soap which will slowly deteriorate the watch and/or band. But hey, its not my watch!
The chemicals in swimming pools and the salt in the sea have similar effects. That's why you need to rinse off the watch (and every other materials including yourself) after swimming in sea or a swimming pool. And of course, you do need to use materials that can actually stand water which rules out all the Apple bands that aren't the rubber or nylon ones.

I just don't understand why people want to wear a wet watch. Those wet watchbands are not comfortable at all, some (such as the nylons ones) can actually cut into your skin. I always end up taking the watch off and leaving it to dry.
 

BarracksSi

Suspended
Jul 14, 2015
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... And of course, you do need to use materials that can actually stand water which rules out all the Apple bands that aren't the rubber or nylon or steel ones....
Fify. ;)

I know, yes, Apple has some fine print that recommends keeping the mesh and link bracelets dry, but it's one of the dumbest pieces of fine print I've ever seen. "Sport" watches were on steel bracelets for decades before durable rubber and urethane bands were invented.
 

tl01

macrumors 68020
Original poster
Jun 20, 2010
2,308
606
I was thinking that the water would be considered high velocity when you dunk into the pool at the end of the slide. That's all. But I have risked it and am wearing it.
 
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dyn

macrumors 68030
Aug 8, 2009
2,708
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Fify. ;)

I know, yes, Apple has some fine print that recommends keeping the mesh and link bracelets dry, but it's one of the dumbest pieces of fine print I've ever seen. "Sport" watches were on steel bracelets for decades before durable rubber and urethane bands were invented.
The dumbest thing is to think that every metal watchband is the same. They are not, especially Apple's version is very different. It looks like any other metal watchband and that's where the similarities end. You don't connect the band to the watch the same as on traditional watches. It uses a specially devised mechanism. This similar mechanism is used in the links of the link bracelet to connect them (and detach them) to each other. If they use a normal steel spring inside them then water is going to be a risk as they'll corrode over time due to water entering the mechanism. The problem isn't the metal itself but the connection between the links and the watch and this can be accelerated with chemicals that are in swimming water or salt in seawater (unlike common believe stainless steel can rust after having been in contact with seawater; clean the watch and it won't be a problem).

The fine print is there for good reason. It is common knowledge that one shouldn't be using metal or leather bands in water unless the manufacturer states otherwise. Especially with the cheaper bands around where they cut costs wherever they can.
 

BarracksSi

Suspended
Jul 14, 2015
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Other watch manufacturers say to rinse their watches in clean water after exposure to seawater, too (even Seiko, Rolex, etc).

So, are you saying Apple's steel is worse? I'm totally baffled by this reasoning.
 

puckhead193

macrumors G3
May 25, 2004
9,210
432
NY
I wanted to see my steps:).
I loved going to amusement parks this past summer with my apple and was amazed at how much walking I did
For the water parks I would leave it. Not worth it unless you need the time. Although climbing up those stairs can be a good workout!
 

mavis

macrumors 601
Jul 30, 2007
4,072
397
Tokyo, Japan
I've gone snorkeling several times with my launch day (original) SS watch. It's still fine. I wouldn't worry too much about it.
 

dyn

macrumors 68030
Aug 8, 2009
2,708
383
.nl
Other watch manufacturers say to rinse their watches in clean water after exposure to seawater, too (even Seiko, Rolex, etc).

So, are you saying Apple's steel is worse? I'm totally baffled by this reasoning.
No, just that steel isn't that prone to water as you think. It's not just Apple that advises against using steel bracelets in water. The problem with a lot of the steel bracelets is the mix of materials used. The links are usual held together with pins and those might be from a different kind of material that is (more) prone to corrosion. And there are also some other kind of minerals and other things in water that can leave a residu behind. That is why often you get the advice to rinse and dry the watchband.