Hackintosh Backups to Macintosh

Discussion in 'OS X El Capitan (10.11)' started by iciconnect, Jan 9, 2016.

  1. iciconnect, Jan 9, 2016
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2016

    iciconnect macrumors newbie

    iciconnect

    Joined:
    May 18, 2010
    #1
    Hello, I created a backup from a hackintosh I once had. I've since sold my hackintosh as a normal PC. I got myself a Mac Pro 1.1 to try out the unsupported process on a real Mac. I was able to get my 2006 Mac Pro 1.1 running with Yosemite and then finally with El Capitan. The problem I have now is whenever I restore from my much needed TimeMachine backup. The restore process works fine and everything works onces it's done. EXCEPT, when I reboot, important things, go wrong. Like lack of video controls in the display settings. I can only run DVI from one monitor. The HDMI not shown in the sound settings, nothing shown there. it doesn't display anything on my second monitor that uses HDMI. There aren't any options for the HDMI at all in the monitor setting, it's not being recognized. PLUS, I have no sound!!. I must use a USB sound driver. I need help locating the Library or System items that match this Mac Pro and not the hackintosh. But I also need to keep my applications. Once this is solved I could then delete my backup and replace it with an authentic copy from a real Mac. FYI, allot of the application I have in my backups are from CDs and DVDs that won't run do to scratches, I managed to have them backed up from each model Mac I've once owned until I finally used a hackintosh. As you know, I will have to purchase them again from the App Store if I want them as digital applications and refuse to do that for something I already own the CD and DVD for. :(
    One last thing to note. This Mac Pro costed me nothing. One of the thing's I've notices from the start; I cannot Flash PRAM or NVRAM. When it's time to RESTART the computer once it goes dark with low RPM fans, it doesn't. I must Force shutdown using the power button once the screen goes blank and fans noise lower. Which is the only bad thing about this Mac Pro.
     
  2. stevep macrumors 6502a

    stevep

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2004
    Location:
    UK
    #2
    After doing a clean install, try using Migration Assistant to restore just your data and user settings, rather than everything in the Time Machine backup. If that works, go back and transfer your applications, maybe a few at a time so you can isolate any problems a bit easier.
     
  3. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 3, 2009
    Location:
    Boston
    #3
    Just do a simple restore of your data, don't do the full bore complete restore because your hackintosh obviously has some custom kexts that will only cause headaches if you load them on your Mac Pro
     
  4. iciconnect, Jan 20, 2016
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2016

    iciconnect thread starter macrumors newbie

    iciconnect

    Joined:
    May 18, 2010
    #4
    Thank you for your reply. To update, I was able to keep my backups in tack when I restored. It was a slow and painstaking process but I was able to track down a few of my problems from the hackintosh backup.
    --- Post Merged, Jan 20, 2016 ---
    What I had to do is this: 1. Create a basic admin account on El Capitan (Clean Install) using the Unsupported install method. 2. After the setup I used my previous OS (Lion) to make a clone of the El Capitan drive as a backup or fail safe and it put it away. 3. I booted into El Capitan without logging into my Apple ID. I'm sure if I had it wouldn't mattered. 4. I then restored from my hackintosh back up. 5. I booted back in to Lion and I re-followed the steps to replace the boot.efi in El Capitan. 6. Rebooted into El Capitan and I searched through System> Library > Extensions. The kernels that were changed had .bak as their added file extension. This could've been a contributing thanks to a Application called Kext Utility which was used for the Hackintosh. 7. I copied all the extensions I've found that had the .bak on them on to the desktop and I removed the added .bak extension. 8. I used the Kext Utility to restore the extension I removed the .bak from. 9. I used Disk Utility Disk First Aid and selected my El Capitan OS. 10. I restarted my Mac into El Capitan.
     
  5. iciconnect, Jan 20, 2016
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2016

    iciconnect thread starter macrumors newbie

    iciconnect

    Joined:
    May 18, 2010
    #5
    The goal was to keep the applications and folders I needed. So for a final step I logged into my restored account. I logged out of the account and I used the basic admin account I created in the beginning. I then removed the admin user account from El Capitan that I restored from. I've already copied the folders that I needed. I then created another admin account and restarted El Capitan. After testing the new Admin account I removed the basic admin account I used during the setup. I downloaded the El Capitan 10.11.2 combo update and I installed it. After the install I booted back into Lion to fix/repair the boot.efi. Once that was done I booted into El Capitan 10.11.2 and I made a full backup of the new admin user account. I've been using El Capitan for a while now. Is it 100 percent? Well.. There's this one thing that's driving me nuts. I can select my monitor(s) in System Preferences. The OS will not show the icon for monitor options on the Menu bar even when the check mark is selected for it to display. Other than that, all is well.
    --- Post Merged, Jan 20, 2016 ---
    One side note. I still can't get my Mac Pro to reboot normally. I still must shut down and manually press the power button. I'm sure the issue isn't the OS it's most likely the power supply. But I'm opened to any other subjections. :D
     

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