HALP Irishmen HALP

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by Gutwrench, Mar 16, 2018.

  1. Gutwrench Contributor

    Gutwrench

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2011
    #1
    I’ve never made corned beef and cabbage.

    I’m picking up a cured brisket after work to cook tomorrow.

    Any tips for a complete beginner with no corned beef (and cabbage) cooking common sense?

    Should I boil all together or grill it separately?

    Please, no advanced stuff.

    Thanks!
     
  2. D.T. macrumors G3

    D.T.

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2011
    Location:
    Vilano Beach, FL
    #3
    Wife making it, and she kills it, so good - also doing some homemade soda bread (and some locally made apple butter)
     
  3. haxrnick macrumors 6502a

    haxrnick

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2011
    Location:
    Seattle
  4. Gutwrench thread starter Contributor

    Gutwrench

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2011
    #5
  5. Scepticalscribe macrumors Westmere

    Scepticalscribe

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2008
    Location:
    The Far Horizon
    #6
    I've looked at the recipe that @maflynn posted and think it excellent. My mum used to cook something like this when we were kids.

    To my mind, the single most important thing - which is easy to do - is to ensure that you cook the cabbage (with or without potatoes, some people like plain boiled potatoes with this dish) in the stock that the meat has already been cooked in; this is what gives it that distinctive flavour.
     
  6. Zenithal, Mar 18, 2018
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2018

    Zenithal macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2009
    #7
    No Irish in me but I've had it a few times prepared the way @Scepticalscribe's mother made it. Cabbage expels its water during cooking and soaks up what's around it very well, IMO. Personally, I prefer my brisket smoked over a long time so that it's fall apart tender.

    I also like my cabbage in two forms: Savory slaw and saurkraut.

    Edit: Oh, and shredded thinly in fajitas... This state has ruined my idea of fajitas.
     
  7. D.T. macrumors G3

    D.T.

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2011
    Location:
    Vilano Beach, FL
    #8
    My wife said, "Just get the corn beef, slow cooker for 2+ hours with stock, a good beer and a dry rub, add root vegetables, cook till tender".

    I mentioned some of your political posts, she said, "Well, maybe make him some easy to follow pics ..."

    I kid, I kid :D

    Hope it went well, we're actually having our today, had to postpone the St. Paddy's feast - so _today_ I can smell the corn beef and cabbage in the slow cooker, several hours of cooking, OMG, and fresh soda bread just came out - plus I scored this incredible organic apple butter, it has ... Apples and reduced Apple cider, no preservatives, holy smokes, it's amazing (it tastes like apple vs. brown sugar goop).
     
  8. Zenithal macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2009
    #9
    I think he's gotten himself stuck in dough. I sent him on a bread baking adventure. Think he's going to enjoy it. It's one of the most relaxing activities out there for me.
     
  9. Gutwrench thread starter Contributor

    Gutwrench

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2011
    #10
    Lol! Thanks! It went okay, I think.

    I simmered it with those root things and made a mustard sauce (brown sugar, ylw mustard, vinegar, Tabasco and garlic powder). The brisket was very tender. I gave 2/3 away to a couple going through a hard time. They called back being gracious. (Please don’t tell your wife. I have a reputation to uphold!! :) )

    I was more excited about making Reubens with it today. Yum! But there’s no leftovers. So much for that idea. I’ll do this again but think I’ll smoke it instead.

    Who’s baking the soda bread you or Mrs D.T.? :(
    --- Post Merged, Mar 18, 2018 ---
    I’m on the second rising. Learning curve...I don’t think I fed the yeast enough.
    --- Post Merged, Mar 18, 2018 ---
    Another, another scotch. I recommend everyone put me on ignore for the night. Ha ha.

    0C1E9A7B-E811-4C48-931F-119A47FFECB6.jpeg
    --- Post Merged, Mar 18, 2018 ---
    PS - thanks to everyone for helping me!
     
  10. Zenithal macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2009
    #11
    Well, little yeast is better than too much yeast or overactive yeast (sugar or honey in dough mixture in addition to naturally occurring sugars in the flour). It gives the bread a strange... yeasty flavor. You lived in the Bay Area so you likely have had a brioche or even a challah that wasn't done right and has the peculiar punch in your face flavor that isn't pleasant. In any case, a longer rise will deliver a flavorful dough. This is why some recipes call for an overnight "retarding" of the dough in the refrigerator. It's a two-way street. A slow rise delivers better flavor development, but too little of a rise can cause a denser bread or one that doesn't quite chew or crumb right.

    In any case, the yeast is dirt cheap considering what you can do with it (makes for a fantastic fly trap) and bread flour is cheap.
     
  11. Gutwrench thread starter Contributor

    Gutwrench

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2011
    #12
    Thanks!

    I think my water temp was right (108 F) and the proportion of yeast too, but I suspect I didn’t add enough food. The yeast didn’t look quite like the pictures I saw...and like any good soldier I pushed on anyway. Attack, and attack some more, don’t stop attacking until you’re standing on the enemy’s chest. But I think I should have regrouped instead.
     
  12. Zenithal macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2009
    #13
    Did you buy the French instant? I use a pyrex measuring cup. Throw in the yeast with the water. Froth it up with a fork and let it sit for 10-14 minutes. You can tell it's ready when it turns murky and has a strong yeasty aroma. It isn't particularly pleasant unlike beer yeast. General room temperature matters, too when it comes to the rises. You can throw in a teaspoon or maybe two of honey depending on the batch size in the future. It'll feed the yeast plus it's a bit of preservative. If you do have issues, I'd suggest putting it somewhere warm. A stove or enclosed area with a small tea candle should do well. Or if you've got floor vents, near one when the heat's running. Worst case, if a bread doesn't turn out well, you can dry it out for bread crumbs or croutons.
     
  13. Gutwrench thread starter Contributor

    Gutwrench

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2011
    #14

    I bought Red Star and fed it (a teaspoon of) honey.

    You read my mind. I’ve preheated the oven and moved it to the stove. I’m being patient and giving it more time. It’s almost to the top of my large Pyrex bowl.

    Good idea on the crumbs or croutons. Plus there’s some birds that would probably like it too.

    I appreciate the tips.
     
  14. Zenithal macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2009
    #15
    Yeah, the Red Star and Saff are made by Lesaffre. I don't even remember why they market the same product at the same price point and size. Yeah, lowest setting available, 10 minutes, turn off. Make sure it isn't too hot in there. You can keep the door ajar for a little while. In the summer, you can put it in a warm area with a tea towel on top.

    You can also do a sour starter. No yeast needed. Simple stuff. Just need a plastic tupperware or similar container. We don't always do our own bread but usually go through a binge making process when we pick up a new block of yeast. You can also freeze doughs for up to two months. Easier if you've got a chest freezer.
     
  15. oldhifi macrumors 65816

    oldhifi

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2013
    Location:
    USA
    #16
    I cook Kielbasa Smoke Sausage with cabbage:

    Cut sausage in 1/4 in links and fry in bacon grease, add 1 TB of Tony Chachere's Creole Seasoning, cabbage and 4 cups of water, let simmer for a hour..
     
  16. D.T. macrumors G3

    D.T.

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2011
    Location:
    Vilano Beach, FL
    #17
    Oh she did this round :) Soda bread (at least the couple of traditional recipes we've used) is nice because no rising, no yeast, it's about a 10 minute prep, 45 minutes in the oven (last 15 uncovered).

    Glad it turned out :D

    Some of our goodies (holy smokes, the broth was so good, I had mine in a big bowl like soup)

    IMG_3354_1200.JPG



    IMG_3356_1200.JPG


    A new-to-me from Cigar City, fantastic, lots of maltiness up front, tons of body, nice hoppy finish (citra hops)


    IMG_3357_1200.JPG
     
  17. Gutwrench thread starter Contributor

    Gutwrench

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2011
  18. Zenithal macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2009
  19. Zenithal, Mar 20, 2018
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2018

    Zenithal macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2009
    #20
    If you make a soda bread, I suggest golden raisins, finely chopped rosemary, crushed golden flax and chia seeds. Extra sugar or honey, but not too sweet. You can exclude the seeds but it gives the bread a slight nuttiness that balances out the savory and sweet. Also, it's fiber.

    Hawaiian or Portuguese sweet bread is a must bake, too. Goes well with spiced honey butter.

    Crap. @Gutwrench Forgot to mention that high sugar content doughs may require a different SAF or Red Star yeast developed for that sugar content. Some sugar increases yeast activity, higher levels actually inhibits the capacity of the rises. I believe the yellow label is the one to use. There's a blue or purple for rapid rise but IMO the end product just doesn't taste as good. Gold is good for about 40% sugar content.

    Edit: Yellow = gold.
     
  20. D.T. macrumors G3

    D.T.

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2011
    Location:
    Vilano Beach, FL
    #21
    That might be good, but is sure as heck isn't _traditional_ soda bread :D

    From The Society for the Preservation of Irish Soda Bread:

     
  21. Zenithal macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2009
    #22
    Traditional shmaditional! I'll give it to them on the buttermilk. Store bought preparations are disgusting. We made butter recently and ended up with a lot more buttermilk than I thought we were going to end up with. Goodness, that stuff is delicious (and not great for the waist). Ended up using the last of it for waffles.

    Most soda breads I've had came with caraway. Which you either like or don't like. I've never met someone who was in between. :p
     

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21 March 16, 2018