handbrake file size question

Discussion in 'Apple TV and Home Theater' started by utl768, Mar 14, 2011.

  1. utl768 macrumors 6502

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    Sep 8, 2009
    #1
    im trying to encode a 2.5 hour movie that i have in vob file format and when handbrake encodes it via the apple tv 2 preset it gives me a final file size of over 6gb

    this seems excessive tho considering it should be compressing it and not making it nearly the same size as the ripped vob should be
     
  2. From A Buick 8 macrumors 68040

    From A Buick 8

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    Ky Close to CinCinnati
    #2
    What size is the file to start with and does it play well before you run it through HB
     
  3. utl768 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    Sep 8, 2009
    #3
    7.78 gb and it plays fine in vlc and on my ps3

    i ripped a blu ray that was 40 gb using the same settings and it checked in at 1.8 gb

    i use the apple tv 2 setting and changed nothing at all
     
  4. b-rad g macrumors 6502a

    b-rad g

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    Jun 29, 2010
    #4
    Most of my SD movies that average 1.5 hrs end up around 1.3gb. That seems unusually large.
     
  5. benhollberg macrumors 68020

    benhollberg

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    Mar 8, 2010
    #5
    When I use Handbrake I use the Universal setting, I don't take already existing files though just from DVDs. Maybe that would help but my sizes are always about 1.5 GB, except for really long ones.
     
  6. utl768 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #6
    does the file being in vob make a difference and is the apple tv settings known to make big file sizes like that
     
  7. benhollberg macrumors 68020

    benhollberg

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    Mar 8, 2010
    #7
    I have never use VOB.
     
  8. utl768 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    Sep 8, 2009
    #8
    this problem is only with stuff i ripped from my wwe dvd collection too

    i just ripped my scarface dvd and converted it with handbrake and it ripped it to 2.5 gb which is good for 170 minutes

    same setting too

    wwe must add something wierd to there dvd's or some crap
     
  9. rayward macrumors 68000

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    Mar 13, 2007
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    Houston, TX
    #9
    I've ripped and bunch of movies for my 1st gen ATVs. A ripped movie from a DVD comes in around 1-3GB and a ripped movie from BD (downscaled to 720p) comes in anywhere from 4-8GB - all depending on the movie length and the bitrate.

    The ATV2 preset allows a higher bitrate than the ATV1 preset, so I don't think that a 2.5 hour movie at 720p being 6GB is out of whack. If that's a DVD rip at 6GB, then you should update your Handbrake presets because something's wrong. If storage space is your issue, you can limit the file size in Handbrake (set the target file size to, say, 4000 to get a file just under 4GB), but you'll lose picture quality doing that.
     
  10. From A Buick 8 macrumors 68040

    From A Buick 8

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    Sep 16, 2010
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    #10
    I think you are onto something. Do you have access to a program called DVD2oneX, you can run the file through that and it can clean up some structure errors.

    DETOX (DVD2oneX) is a program to compress DVD's but you can set the output file to the same size as the orig file and there will be no compression.
     
  11. harpster macrumors regular

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    Jan 26, 2010
    #11
    When you rip a DVD (uncompressed) you are then working with the DVD native file structure which are .VOB's, .IFO, & .BUP usually in a folder named VIDEO_TS. For most DVD movies the ripped DVD will be around 6-8 GB. You can open a VIDEO_TS folder in Handbrake and it's exactly the same as selecting the inserted DVD.

    In Handbrake the Quality RF number has a lot to do with the encoded file size. Using RF 19 or 20 should result in a 2g (very approx.) file size. I encode to MKV and I think that MP4 results in a little larger file size. But 6 gig seems way too high for an encoded DVD. I recently ripped 250 DVD's in Handbrake to MKV, High Profile, RF 19.25 and my largest file was 1.85 gig. Try a few different DVD's and if the results are the same I'd definitely say you have a problem there.
     
  12. dynaflash macrumors 68020

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    Mar 27, 2003
    #12
    Remember that constant quality encoding will maintain a given visual quality (as referenced by the rf number) regardless of required bitrate. Grainy complex sources will require much more bitrate hence a larger final file size than say a very clean animated source. My guess is that the source is grainy. Older music/concert videos are notorious for ballooning file size when using constant quality.
     
  13. rayward macrumors 68000

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    Mar 13, 2007
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    #13
    B&W movies do this too; for Clerks and Young Frankenstein I had to back off the RF number to get them to play on my ATV1 as the bitrate was over 7000.

    As an aside, I had to back off the RF number for The Hurt Locker too, when I first encoded it under the old version of HB. I re-encoded it in the new version (to get the 6-channel sound), left the preset alone, and it plays fine. Weird.
     

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