handwritten logos?

Discussion in 'Design and Graphics' started by zoran, Feb 8, 2017.

  1. zoran macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2005
    #1
    Im wondering how logos like the one attached are created.
    - Can it be written by pencil, scanned and then taken to illustrator in order to perfect its flaws?
    - Could it be directly designed using a wacom?
    - No wacom, just a few hours using illustrator and an mouse?
    FELDTHUSEN-LOGO.jpg
     
  2. AngerDanger macrumors 68030

    AngerDanger

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2008
    #2
    Really, it could be any of the above. If you want to try making something like that yourself, Preview has a feature that allows you to add signatures by holding a piece of signed paper up to the iSight camera. You can then place the signature on any document and crop it.

    ad.png
     
  3. zoran thread starter macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2005
  4. AngerDanger macrumors 68030

    AngerDanger

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2008
    #4
    frame143.png
     
  5. superscape macrumors 6502a

    superscape

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2008
    Location:
    East Riding of Yorkshire, UK
    #5
    Wow! I never knew that! Every day's a school day, I guess.
     
  6. macuser453787 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    May 19, 2012
    Location:
    Galatians 3:13-14
    #6
    Hmm, be careful of this feature if it's creating a raster image instead of a vector graphic. Logos should be a vector graphic when possible, so that they can scale to any size without losing quality (raster images always trade resolution for size). And vector graphics can always be rasterized for specific uses where raster is needed or preferred instead of vector.
     
  7. AngerDanger macrumors 68030

    AngerDanger

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2008
    #7
    It is not.
     
  8. macintoshmac macrumors 65816

    macintoshmac

    Joined:
    May 13, 2010
    #8
  9. AngerDanger macrumors 68030

    AngerDanger

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2008
    #9
    Here you go.
     
  10. macintoshmac macrumors 65816

    macintoshmac

    Joined:
    May 13, 2010
    #10
    Ah, good old interface lift. :) Thank you so much!
     
  11. 960design macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2012
    Location:
    Destin, FL
    #11
    iPad Pro's Notes App with the Apple pen beautify's my writing, by softening the strokes and some other magic.
     
  12. zoran thread starter macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2005
    #12
    Any chance of posting any examples here so i can see in detail what you describe?
     
  13. paulryp macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2016
    #13
    Typography is infinate. What are you trying to achieve and why, are you tapping into trends or some thing more classic. Why don't you have look at dafont.com

    Your above image looks more like a signature. There are typefaces that can do signature emulation quite well, but your best bet is to pass a piece of paper to various people you know that have nice handwriting and seeing what happens.

    Also that above example has NO craft so could be done in minutes. Auto traced in illustrator doesn't really matter at this point as you need to get something worth tracing ;)
     
  14. 960design macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2012
    Location:
    Destin, FL
    #14
    An example of my handwriting would be a sad repeat of a first C in third grade. There is an alternative:

    Google Fonts = handwriting
    There are a little over 100 variants to choose. Here is a quick example:

    handwrittenfontexamples.png


    They can be found here for free:
    https://fonts.google.com/?category=Handwriting

    I use them for all the typesetting in documents or applications that need a handwritten element.
     
  15. typonaut macrumors member

    Joined:
    May 7, 2014
    #15
    FontShop used to have a service where they'd convert your handwriting to a font, if you'd fill in a form with a sample (and pay a fee). I expect there is someone around that still does that.

    In general logos created in that handwritten style have had a lot of work done on them - scan the writing, outline with Illustrator (or Freehand, when we still had some competition on the Mac), and adjust, adjust, adjust... until you can get something that is useable and workable. You might need different versions for different uses (ie you dont really want a really detailed version, with all the lumps and bumps, for small usage, or you might need a thicker version for small usage...).

    As someone who has done a *lot* of small use rasterised logos I can also tell you that you cannot rely on the rasteriser to adequately convert beziers - you need to rework pixel by pixel.
     
  16. MechaSpanky macrumors 6502

    MechaSpanky

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2007
    #16
    typonaut,

    A lot of people who used to love Freehand have moved over to Affinity Designer. I never cared for Freehand and I always preferred Illustrator but I agree it was nice to have some competition. When Adobe went to a subscription model, I switched over to Affinity Designer and while I still have to use Illustrator occasionally (a presubscription version of course), Affinity Designer out shines Illustrator in many areas. Sure there are some areas where it is still lacking compared to Illustrator but the developers are adding features to it quickly and for the price ($50 and not a subscription) it is a joy to use.

    Mecha
     
  17. MacGizmo macrumors 6502a

    MacGizmo

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2003
    Location:
    Arizona
    #17
    I've messed with Designer and Photos. Very nice. If they ever release their InDesign competitor (Publisher), I'm gonna give it a serious look at switching.
     
  18. MechaSpanky macrumors 6502

    MechaSpanky

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2007
    #18
    MacGizmo,

    I think many people are in the same boat in regards to waiting for Publisher. I too am looking forward to it. I can't wait to see what they are going to bring to the Layout space with Publisher. We sure could use some choices in the layout space.

    I love Designer, drawing in Designer is so much nicer than Illustrator. There are still a few things missing but with every little bump release (which they don't charge for) brings the program one step closer. Photos is nice too. Some people complain because it is too similar to Photoshop and others complain that isn't like Photoshop. To me, it is similar enough to Photoshop so it is easy to learn (if you know Photoshop) but it still has a personality all its own, which is nice.
     

Share This Page