Happy Thanksgiving

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by maflynn, Nov 26, 2015.

  1. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

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    #1
    I wish to extend my well wishes to all who celebrate Thanksgiving today.

    I'll be heading out to be with my dysfunctional family having lots of turkey :)
    turkey_moo.jpg
     
  2. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #2
    Endure your dysfunctional family, enjoy your turkey, and add to the bank of happy memories, while discreetly discarding the others.

    To all of Our American Cousins Across the Pond: I hope you all have a terrific Thanksgiving enjoying a well-ladedn table in the company of your loved ones, friends and family, both.
     
  3. D.T. macrumors 604

    D.T.

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    #3
    Somehow it made it through the night without a nibble :D

    [​IMG]
     
  4. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #4
    It looks amazing, and you can congratulate yourselves on your exemplary restraint. Now, that begs the question of just what exactly is it - an apple tart, or?
     
  5. D.T. macrumors 604

    D.T.

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    #5
    Homemade apple pie, perfect mix of sweet, tart and savory (the organic Granny Smiths tasted amazing) even the crust was made from scratch by my lovely wife :) Her Thanksgiving feasts are the stuff of legend :D
     
  6. Zenithal Suspended

    Joined:
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    #6
    Apple lattice pie. Tarts are more shallow, don't have dough on top except for the rare small fruit shaped dough, and have nearly vertical walls. They're also far lighter in flavor as they contain less sugar. And will sometimes, but rarely, use a custard base under the fruit, that gets cooked twice.

    It looks lovely, and I love the spillage. More rustic and caremalization. Much better than dreadful and disgusting pecan pie. A bastardization of the walnut. And that nasty brown gloop.
     
  7. determined09 macrumors 65816

    determined09

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    #7
    Will your wife let you post the recipe of this apple pie?

    Sorry I quoted the wrong post. Please delete mods. Thank you
     
  8. determined09 macrumors 65816

    determined09

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    #8
    Will your wife let you post her apple pie recipe ? Thank you. That looks so good.
     
  9. Zenithal Suspended

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    #9
    If we can talk pies, there are a lot of silly pies. Such as banana cream pie. Sans banana slices laid on top of the base crust, it isn't exactly banana anything. It's a custard pie. Sugar pie, both the European and North American variant, Grasshopper pie (wth?), et al. should be tossed aside. So many silly pies.
     
  10. determined09 macrumors 65816

    determined09

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    #10
    You can't forget the sweet potato pie. Yummy.
    image.jpg
     
  11. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #11
    Thank you.

    Again, it looks absolutely amazing, and irresistibly delicious.

    When I was a kid, my mom made homemade apple tarts - from cooking apples, with brown sugar and grated lemon zest; she made her own buttery pastry, too. Anyway, they had that same - superb - taste of sweet, tart, and savoury that I love, and have never forgotten.

    Agree with @SwitchFX that the spillage - caramelised loveliness - looks as though it is oozing divinely delicious flavours. Gorgeous.


    Thanks a lot. We don't seem to do pies this Side of the Pond, rather, we seem to prepare versions of apple tarts. But the really good ones - generous with flavoursome fruit, cooking apples, and/or Granny Smiths - are superb.
     
  12. Zenithal Suspended

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    #12
    All I'll say is that particular pie looks like something else that's not edible. I prefer my sweet potatoes to be savory.
     
  13. determined09 macrumors 65816

    determined09

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    #13
    That pie was eaten up before 2 pm last Monday. It's my fathers world famous sweet pie. The people at my job have already asked me when is your father going to start selling pies.
     
  14. Zenithal Suspended

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    #14
    It's too wet. The only time I've used sweet potato in something "sweet" was a cake sans spice (mellow and moist), a sweet bread and as a filling for choux pastry. Each year I do cookup a traditional SP dish for the people who want sweet, such as my brothers' kids and my cousins' children or whomever, but for some of us including myself, I make a savory dish using fiery spices and herbs such as rosemary. I'd say the only herb I don't use is common sage, because, and excuse the language, it smells like piss. Good sage is hard to come by both fresh and dried.
     
  15. determined09 macrumors 65816

    determined09

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    #15
    Oh okay. I see. But It still was good. The other wasn't as wet. My iPhone doesn't take good photos.
     
  16. Jessica Lares macrumors G3

    Jessica Lares

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    #16
    Happy Thanksgiving to you and everybody else too! :)

    We don't do turkey (my parents don't care for it), instead we have a ham with pineapple and then the regular stuffing, cranberry sauce, mashed potatoes, salad, more fruit, and a few other things. And of course some pie. I think we're having both apple and pumpkin pie this afternoon.
     
  17. Zenithal Suspended

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    #17
    I see. You should really consider getting an Android phone. *Hides from swarming crowd of loyal Apple fans*

    Actually, now that I think about it, I have made a SP pie, but using golden sweet potatoes. I'm sure you've had them. They're SP shaped and have a rich golden color inside similar to yukon gold. Very dry texture but much sweeter with a honey-esque flavor profile. I usually bake those with parsnips and multi colored carrots in butter each Christmas and top with a light but thick balsamic vinaigrette. Though this year I am doing a variation of the Better Homes carrot salad (sliced steamed carrots) with tahini, but instead of cilantro I'm using dill for a fresher taste. Also smoked Himalayan salt, freshly grated ginger and a small infusion of aioli.



    20 lb ham trimmed with thin and minimal bone. Any leftover ham makes great sandwichs. And let's be honest, no party even one of 30 will finish off a ham that large given all that other food.
     
  18. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #18
    Now, that dish you describe is very similar to something I prepare with similar sweet potatoes, - deep golden in colour, and yes, quite dry in texture - carrots and parsnips. Drizzled with olive oil, honey and - yes - sometimes a dash of balsamic vinegar - when roasted, they make a terrific vegetable accompaniment.

    Re ham, I boil it first, and then bake it (scored with honey, brown sugar, mustard and cloves).
     
  19. D.T. macrumors 604

    D.T.

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    #19
    One of my favorite Thanksgiving pies is a Drambuie pumpkin (sometimes called +Chiffon). The short version: the base pumpkin foundation is made with Drambuie and a little gelatin (usual suspects of ginger, nutmeg, allspice, etc.), and you fold in meringue and chill. It's about 3" thick, light and fluffy, and the Drambuie liquor adds another whole dimension to the flavor.
     
  20. Zenithal Suspended

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    #20
    Yeah, I don't think traditional sweet potatoes are common on your end of the pond, but the yellow ones are. But yes, herbs and spices complement it well. There's something magical about parsnips and even raw fennel. Not many people consume them. Sad as it is.
     
  21. D.T., Nov 26, 2015
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2015

    D.T. macrumors 604

    D.T.

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    #21
    Oh sure. She's elbow deep in our bird at the moment (a beautiful 20lb Butterball :)).


    When we have ham leftover - after it's been "sandwiched" down to the bone/scraps - I make a n-bean soup (n=7, 12, 15, whatever). Just a basic chicken stock, celery, garlic onions a few other secret dried seasonings - bring it to a boil with the ham remnants, lower it, add beans (they soak overnight), let it cook slowly for several hours. Wow, so delicious, the remaining ham just falls apart, tender, the herbs/seasoning mix with the ham flavor, a little side of cornbread ... <drools>
     
  22. Jessica Lares macrumors G3

    Jessica Lares

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    #22
    Ha, I don't know what size we usually get, but it's only five of us. I think my mom does prepare it that way @Scepticalscribe. It usually lasts us well into following week as sandwiches.
     
  23. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #23
    And you doubtless, are offering tender, loving care by way of support……..a poured and decanted glass of wine placed close by her elbow, Mozart on the iPod….lavish praise for her efforts…..

    How does she prepare the turkey?

    However, her apple pie looked stunning; it strikes me that it is a recipe worth noting. (Do tell her of the drooling sounds that are currently being heard both sides of the Atlantic.)


    These years, at Christmas, we have dispensed with preparing turkey and ham together; there are only three of us, and it is a demanding dish as it requires a lot of things to come right simultaneously.

    So, I prepare the ham a few days later, in the way described, and yes, it is delicious, and yes, it does make for excellent sandwiches for a few days afterwards. Agreed.
     
  24. Zenithal Suspended

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    #24
    Thank you for supporting my SEB stock. ;)

    We're doing 2 large turkeys this year plus a few 9 lb boneless breasts. Everyone likes breast, be it bird or otherwise. Easier than cooking 4-5 huge birds. I prefer the gamey taste of turkey and find it annoying how it's not available outside of Nov-Dec.
     
  25. Zenithal Suspended

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    Sep 10, 2009
    #25
    I like to think 1/4 lb per person, at least for our get-togethers. Obviously the younger generation doesn't appreciate cold smoked and baked swine like us older folks.
     

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