Hard Drive Disappeared!

Discussion in 'Mac Pro' started by Rokusaburo, Jun 17, 2010.

  1. Rokusaburo macrumors member

    Rokusaburo

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2006
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    #1
    Hey gang,

    I have a 2006 Mac Pro with a stock boot drive and 2 media drives, but today, when I woke up my computer from sleep, one of my boot drives (1TB) had disappeared. The icon does not show up on either the desktop or Finder and the drive does not appear in either Disk Utility or System Profiler.

    I have tried rebooting several times, trying the drive in every slot and swapping it with my other drives, but still no luck!

    If anyone has experienced a similar problem or if they know of a solution, that would be amazing!!
     
  2. BarnacleGrim macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2010
    #2
    I was able to bring back a FireWire drive that dissapeared from Disk Utility with Tech Tool Pro.
     
  3. Loa macrumors 65816

    Loa

    Joined:
    May 5, 2003
    Location:
    Québec
    #3
    Hello,

    Tech Tool Pro's a good idea.

    If possible, you could try mounting the drive in an external enclosure and in someone else's Mac Pro.

    Good Luck,

    Loa
     
  4. cutterman macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2010
    #4
    Can you tell if the drive is spinning up? An external enclosure would be ideal to check this, but if you dont have one then try plugging the drive tray in while the machine is on and listen closely for the whining sound of the motor. If the drive does not spin up it is dead.
     
  5. nanofrog macrumors G4

    Joined:
    May 6, 2008
    #5
    You can also try to re-insert the tray, on the chance the connector isn't making good contact with the backplane connector in the HDD bay.

    If that's not the case, and it's not spinning, the disk is likely DOA.
     
  6. Loa macrumors 65816

    Loa

    Joined:
    May 5, 2003
    Location:
    Québec
    #6
    I didn't know Mac Pros allowed for such plug and play in the drive bays.

    Loa
     
  7. cutterman macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2010
    #7
    The purpose here is just to apply power, which will occur if he makes a physical connection. I think it's moot whether the macpro supports hot-plugging since his drive isnt recognized anyway.
     
  8. Sun Baked macrumors G5

    Sun Baked

    Joined:
    May 19, 2002
    #8
    You might try SMART Utility.app to see if there is a failure on the drive.

    A drive's logic board failure might be a problem.
     
  9. nanofrog macrumors G4

    Joined:
    May 6, 2008
    #9
    If the system is ON, you can damage the PSU that way, as it's not equiped with an Inrush Current Limiter (which is needed for Hot Plugging).
     
  10. Loa macrumors 65816

    Loa

    Joined:
    May 5, 2003
    Location:
    Québec
    #10
    Ah! Thx for the info. I'd always refrained from doing that, now I know why.

    Loa
     
  11. cutterman macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2010
    #11
    I think you folks are being a bit nit-picky. I have hot-plugged (or hot-powered) many drives on many PC's, some of which with cheap PSUs. So unless the macpro's PSU is vastly inferior, I dont think there will be a problem powering up one drive.
     
  12. nanofrog macrumors G4

    Joined:
    May 6, 2008
    #12
    Some boards, add-in cards, or backplanes have the Inrush Current Limiter built-in as to make sure the system is protected.

    In cases where the PSU doesn't have one, nor does anything else that the drive's power may be connected to, the PSU's ratings and actual load will matter. That is, if you've a substantial PSU, and the load is low enough, Hot-Plugging a disk is far less likely to cause any issues than a unit that's delivering power very near it's limits. Also keep in mind, that the ratings for most PSU's are peak ratings, not continuous. In such cases, dividing by the square root of 2 will give you the continuous value (i.e. 400W PSU is really only capable of ~283W continuous).

    This may seem like nit picking, but I assure you, it's not. The details do matter, and as most system PSU's aren't all that robust with thier power delivery, are closer to their limits than most users realize. So to be sure that there won't be a problem, the Inrush Current Limiters are required for Hot-Plug support in workstations and servers.

    You've been lucky on PC's (assuming they're consumer desktops).
     

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