Hard drives for editing...

Discussion in 'Digital Video' started by lJoSquaredl, Dec 1, 2013.

  1. lJoSquaredl macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2012
    #1
    I burned out a WD drive from Best Buy pretty fast. Took about 6 months of editing heavy efx montages for people to get the read/write speeds down to 40-50mb, so i'm looking for a new one. Are drives like the G-Tech ones worth the money, or would it be better spent getting 2-3 of the cheaper 1TB WD drives? Do you get more time out of the better drives or see that big of a performance difference? I can't see RAID being useful for me, at least at this point in my editing career, but as far as external single drives goes, would a more expensive G-Tech drive be useful compared to "economy" ones?

    Also are SD cards with high read/write speeds an option for editing these days? I have a rMBP so i'd assume it has a decent transfer rate altho I haven't checked it out yet.
     
  2. ChrisA macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2006
    Location:
    Redondo Beach, California
    #2
    No. Editing on even a good SD card would be way-slow. Painfully slow. The SD card is about 10X slower then a good solid state disk

    Buy a flah drive. Get one with Thunderbolt if you Mac has TB. Otherwise get USB3 or FW800. The drive only has to be large enough to hold what you are working on. Later to move everything to some archive. Yes it is expensive

    About g-tech. They do NOT make disk drives. They make aluminum boxes and they buy the drives for WD, Seagate or whoever gives then the best deal that week.

    But g-tech does make the best aluminum boxes and the interface and power supply they put int the box is very good. Aluminum is a good material too. It is very strong and helps cool the drive by acting as a big heat sync. But the disk into is still the same part you can buy from WD, Seagate or whatever.

    Flash is the way to go. Here is one for $200 http://eshop.macsales.com/item/Elgato/10024012/
     
  3. kobalap macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2009
    #3
    What does it mean to "burn out" a drive?
     
  4. 2jaded2care macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2003
    Location:
    Atlanta
    #4
    Minor point, but G-Tech is a division of HGST (formerly Hitachi Global Storage Technologies). They used to use Hitachi drives, which had a pretty decent reputation. HGST was purchased by WD, so I assume they use standard WD drives now. Seriously doubt you'd find Seagate inside.
     
  5. ChrisA macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2006
    Location:
    Redondo Beach, California
    #5
    Best I can figure is that he has filled the outer tracks with data. This is the fastest area of the disk and then as you use the inside tracks the tangental velocity is less, there are less bits per revolution. So I took his "burn out" to mean he filled the drive about 1/2 full with data. (Not quite an accurate term but then how many people know how drive work?)
     
  6. lJoSquaredl thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2012
    #6
    Just meant it was pretty fast when I got it, and dropped to the speeds of my 8 year old 5400rpm hard drive in a year. Not surprised since it was just a passport drive to hold me over, didn't even have ventilation. But I guess a year of use, decent speeds at the beginning, and price of $60 you can't beat what I got out of it. Could get 2 and have em last almost 2 years I suppose for the same price as a decent one to begin with. I guess it just depends on how you wanna work with hard drives and probably just comes down to failure rate altho that could happen at any time anyways.
     

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