HDD Fan rpm without HDD (with SSD BTO)

Discussion in 'iMac' started by qap, Apr 19, 2011.

  1. qap macrumors 6502

    qap

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2011
    Location:
    Udine, Italy
    #1
    Hi, I'm just curious, what are the stock/standard hdd fan rpm for the imac with the SSD bto? Is there the fan and works the same as the HDD fan (1098/1100rpm iMac 27") ?

    thanks!
     
  2. qap thread starter macrumors 6502

    qap

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2011
    Location:
    Udine, Italy
  3. Detosx macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2010
    #3
    Hi qap, if the 2010 model as far as I have been able to determine - and don't quote me on this but do check out the many SSD drive threads here - the fan runs at a constant 1100rpm for the SSD if using an SSD in place of a hard drive; Apple make a jumper short (modders fitting an SSD in absence of a hard drive apparently use a staple and insulating tape) available from spares vendors for around $19, which causes said fan to run at a constant 1100rpm. As far as I know in situations where there is both a hard drive and SSD and the SSD is the boot/apps drive, fan speed is again around 1100rpm as per the temperature of an untaxed hard drive.
     
  4. qap thread starter macrumors 6502

    qap

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2011
    Location:
    Udine, Italy
    #4
    So.. the fan work the same as with the normal HDD. :) thanks for the reply ;)
     
  5. Detosx macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2010
    #5
    I would recommend anyone have a good read through the many SSD threads and, if determined to fit an SSD yourself which I wouldn't advise anyone do, take a look at iFixit's detailed disassembly strip down of the 27" iMac. One concern I have is that some of the ribbon cables on the panel look flimsy/easy to accidentally break. It looks as though you would have to very slowly and carefully inch the screen out of its holding position until you see the ribbon cables; a second pair of hands might be a good idea. I use soft-pad non-metal tweezers for removing ribbon cables in laptops, though cautiously look out for slider retention clips that solidly hold some of those cables in. The number of people who damage ribbon cables is a whole genre of nightmare all on its own, though I do have some pretty strange work-related nightmares. I am sure you have a plan of action, though letting a company like OWC fit an SSD drive seems like a worthwhile investment to me. A pity they don't have a branch in the UK.
     

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