HDD Replacement on MBP SR voids Apple Care??

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by johnmclane2000, Jun 14, 2007.

  1. johnmclane2000 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2007
    #1
    Hi there,

    I ordered a MBP SR with the Apple Care Protection Plan.

    On arrival I plan on replacing the internal 120GB HDD with a 250GB HDD from Samsung. I need the extra space and Apple Store upgrade prices are not really sexy.

    Besides I don't mind doing the handywork as I've done stuff like that before and it seems simple enough to me.

    I understand that if I should break anything myself in the replacement process that it is not covered by Apple Care guaranty. Fair and square.
    Also the part I will be replacing is not covered by the guaranty (which is ok since I will have seperate guaranty from Samsung for the new HDD).

    But I have heard that opening the casing voids actually the whole guaranty. Now that would be totally unacceptable since I have paid hundreds of € for that.

    I have heard conflicting things about this. Some people claim it does void the guaranty others say it doesn't.

    Does anyone know for sure, either from personal experience or can quote the relevant passages from the Apple terms and conditions?

    This is really important as I and probably many others depend on being able to replace the HDD in the MBP without losing the precious guaranty.

    Many thanks in advance for your input!

    John
     
  2. Sbrocket macrumors 65816

    Sbrocket

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    #2
    It comes down to this. Opening the case and replacing the hard drive, by the rules of the AppleCare contract, does void your warranty. That said, it is ultimately up to the decision of the AppleCare service rep who works on your machine if you ever need warranty service as to whether or not to say "You broke the warranty and it isn't covered." If you make absolutely no identifying marks at all and swap in the original hard drive before you bring it in for warranty service, they won't be able to tell it was swapped. But its your gamble. If they open it up and see marks on the case screws, you're in their hands.

    NB: Can we make a sticky with this info or something?
     
  3. Wolfpup macrumors 68030

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    Sep 7, 2006
    #3
    I've been asking this too (multiple places). It's literally what's stopped me from ordering a Mac Book Pro-and if I end up with a Dell instead, it will be entirely because of this issue.

    After going through trillions of responses, it looks like the general consensus is what Sbrocket said.

    One person linked the warrenty to me, and there's a line in there that "unauthorized modifications" to the Macbook void the warrenty. And this most likely counts as an "unauthorized modification" since it's not listed as a user replaceable part as on the Macbook. (I think it's "d" under the list of things that void the warrenty.)

    So...yeah...theoretically you're probably flying without a net as soon as you crack it open.

    If you haven't, I'd check the instructions on OWC (a video) and iFixit. The OWC video looks a bit scary, as when you're pulling off and putting on the top it's making these loud clicking sounds as clips break away. It sure SOUNDS like those could break as you're doing this.
     
  4. cbatt macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2004
    #4
    External Firewire Drives

    If I keep harping on this, it might sink in:

    Don't bother with the internal drive upgrades unless you don't have physical space on, or around, your desk (or wherever you work). Or if you find yourself editing audio/video, while flying across the continent, on a regular basis. The costs outweigh the benefits. (not to mention, the potential of voiding your applecare)

    The absolute best alternative is to purchase a good Firewire drive or drive enclosure. Most of the enclosures can take full-sized (3.5" desktop PC) drives that are less expensive, have better performance, vastly more storage, and are more robust. Some of the enclosures even allow you to have two drives configured in some form of RAID for even better performance or reliability.

    Certain USB enclosures are also an excellent choice if you simply need portable (not speedy) mass storage because some of them run directly off of USB power and don't require you to haul around another wall wart.

    Get an external drive.
     
  5. FireArse macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2004
    #5
    You're kidding, right?

    Just get the external drive - it'll save you time & effort.

    It'll also give you peace of mind.

    F
     
  6. Wolfpup macrumors 68030

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    Sep 7, 2006
    #6
    External drives don't solve all the reasons you'd want to be able to swap internal drives.
     
  7. Squonk macrumors 65816

    Squonk

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2005
    #7
    Isn't swapping a drive on the MB an authorized modification. Whereas swapping the drive on a MBP is authorized.

    This very issue will cause me to one of three ways:

    1) Buy a MacBook instead
    2) Buy a refurb model of the previous generation (2.15 or 2.33), swap the drive and NOT buy AppleCare.
    3) Buy the 2.4 model on refurb + AppleCare.

    Options 3 works for me as all I want is a 160GB drive.

    The 250GB option is certainly a whole other ball game!

    This situation would not steer me off of the Mac platform though - I will not give up my OSX! No Dell for me.
     
  8. cbatt macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2004
    #8
    didn't mean to sound harsh

    You are right. Sorry, I didn't address this in my post above.

    Voiding your warranty because you want to swap the drive is silly and a definite mark against the MBP's current design and one of the distinct advantages of the Macbook (and just about every other notebook on the market)

    There are indeed many times when you would want to swap out your internal drive without figuring that you'd have to get an authorized apple technician to work on it. I mean, hard drives and RAM are the top two upgrades (and the simplest).

    But, things being as they are... in order to mitigate your risk as much as possible, do yourself a favor and go with an external. Keep your personal data (ie. your Home folder, not the OS nor your applications) on the external drive and use the external drive for Audio and Video manipulation. This has the additional effect of putting less stress on the internal drive and thus reduces the likelihood of failure.
     
  9. Wolfpup macrumors 68030

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    #9
    Dang, I obviously want an Apple, 'cause I can't talk myself out of it even when I know the logical thing to do is go Dell :D
     
  10. iW00t macrumors 68040

    iW00t

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    #10
    A dent voids Applecare.

    A scratch voids Applecare.

    Makes you look at your MacBook Pro differently now does it not?
     
  11. Nermal Moderator

    Nermal

    Staff Member

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    New Zealand
    #11
    I replaced the drive in mine a couple of months ago. Naturally, I went through the warranty with a fine-toothed comb before doing so, and there was nothing in there saying I wasn't allowed to open the computer. They simply don't cover any damage to the system while poking around in there :)
     
  12. magius macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2007
    #12
    or if you're really scared most apple authorized resellers will install it for you for a price which won't void applecare. over here it is around 60 dollars canadian.
     
  13. Apple Corps macrumors 68020

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    California
    #13

    Would you please post the details where that is said in the AppleCare contract?
     
  14. prome05 macrumors newbie

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    Aug 22, 2006
    #14
    I checked with the Apple Certified place on campus, and was told that they could replace it for $30.
     
  15. Habusho macrumors 6502

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    Aug 12, 2006
    #15
    Quick question for everybody. How would Apple know if the work is done by a certified tech? Is there a database or something that they check off what's been done to a computer??? I mean if I took it to Compusa how would Apple know if it was them or me who did the work?
     
  16. Sbrocket macrumors 65816

    Sbrocket

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    #16
    Section 1 (Repair Coverage), Part b (Limitations):
    (ii) Damage to the Covered Equipment caused by accident, abuse, neglect, misuse (including faulty installation, repair, or maintenance by anyone other than Apple or an Apple Authorized Service Provider), unauthorized modification, extreme environment (including extreme temperature or humidity), extreme physical or electrical stress or interference, fluctuation or surges of electrical power, lightning, static electricity, fire, acts of God or other external causes;
     
  17. Habusho macrumors 6502

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    #17
    I'm not a lawyer or anything but it sounds like unless you damage your computer with the mod than you're good to go. "Damage... caused by..."
     
  18. Sbrocket macrumors 65816

    Sbrocket

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    #18
    Sure that's what you read, but Apple can claim that in the process of making whatever modification you made (in this case, replacing the hard drive) you somehow caused the current problem due to improper assembly, disassembly, etc etc. And that's certainly possible. Ultimately, the decision to repair your machine is up to Apple and you'd have a long uphill battle to convince the service rep otherwise if they decided to nix your warranty because you swapped out the hard drive.
     
  19. Wolfpup macrumors 68030

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    #19
    The issue is probably with the one listed as "d" on the full warranty legalese. That your warranty is void if you make any unauthorized modifications to the system-and opening it up to swap drives is an unauthorized modification.

    Surely not *ANY* little cosmetic dent or scratch? It would be nearly impossible not to pick something up, wouldn't it? The thing's made of metal. Any portable electronics are going to get slightly dinged up, even if you take good care of them.

    It also says it's void if you make an unauthorized modification.
     
  20. Erasmus macrumors 68030

    Erasmus

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    Hiding from Omnius in Australia
    #20
    Grrr... Bloody... Americans... and... their... obsession... with... Christianity...

    (No offence, of course)

    Why can't religion be left religion, and be kept separate from politics and law???

    Things like this annoy the "hell" out of me, seeing as I'm atheist. If someone tried to claim that my warranty was void because an "Act of God" voided it, I'd completely lose it! Of course a real Christian would claim that everything is an "Act of God", and therefore all broken Macbook Pros, and all not broken ones too, have no warranty...

    (Thinks of certain movie)

    Hmmm... Safari's spell checker is both incapable of recognising Australian spelling, and does not know the word "Macbook". Apple should fix this.
     
  21. Nermal Moderator

    Nermal

    Staff Member

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    #21
    No, it says it's void if you cause damage through unauthorised modification.
     
  22. Sbrocket macrumors 65816

    Sbrocket

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    #22
    Exactly, though what most people would consider "damage" is much greater than what Apple would consider in warranty matters. In other words, I'm sure Apple uses this clause as an excuse to cancel your warranty by saying that it was damaged simply through the process of the unauthorized modification since it isn't designed to be user replaced.

    The term "Act of God" simply means a natural occurance caused by forces outside human hands, no matter whatever your personal faith says controls these "forces." And maybe some crazy Creationists would claim that everything is directly controlled by God's hand, but as a Catholic, I can say your views of Christian beliefs could use a bit of updating; I certainly wouldn't claim that everything is an Act of God, especially with the whole idea of free will.
     
  23. Erasmus macrumors 68030

    Erasmus

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    #23
    Then you're not a real Christian. I would say you're a neo-christian. There you go, you've been classified!
    And yes, I do know one or two people who truly believe everything is an "Act of God". Which is kinda sad in my opinion, but whatever.

    Luckily, real christians are few and far between nowadays. With the whole Science thing and all.

    Free Will, What is this concept? There's no "Free Will". We are all products of our society, and therefore cannot be held accountable for our own actions. If you're talking about how William should be freed from Jail, I agree. As he is a product of our society, we are all to blame for his many, many crimes! And we can't send everyone to jail now can we? Or can we? (Hmmm...)

    </randomness>
     
  24. Apple Corps macrumors 68020

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    California
    #24
    My read is that the warranty is still valid UNLESS you damage something while installing the drive. This topic has come up many times and a warranty obligation can not be voided unless your work contributed directly to the defect you are seeking warranty coverage for.
     
  25. Sbrocket macrumors 65816

    Sbrocket

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    #25
    But that's just the point. Apple can claim that the very fact that you changed the supported hardware of the machine in question caused direct or indirect damage by action of the computer owner and, therefore, the warranty is void. In other words, you didn't scratch or damage the machine otherwise, but the fact that you installed an unsupported drive = void warranty. Do you not see that?

    And I'm not even sure that the warranty is in fact valid after opening the case. There could be a clause somewhere in the mounds of a legalese found in the full copy of the AppleCare warranty terms.
     

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