HDR photos not combined correctly

Discussion in 'iPhone' started by Mic'sBook, Sep 13, 2012.

  1. Mic'sBook macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2010
    Location:
    Hong Kong
    #1
    As you may know, when you take a photo with HDR enabled, the iPhone takes 3 photos in rapid succession. It takes one that's in normal exposure, one that's underexposed and one that's overexposed. The iPhone combines these 3 photos with its own algorithm to produce an HDR photo.

    Screen shot 2012-09-13 at 6.56.31 PM.png

    Now, when I take an HDR photo with my iPhone 4 running iOS 5.1.1, most of the time, there aren't any problems. However, the HDR photos sometimes aren't combined correctly, especially when taking photos of grids, straight lines, etc.

    (The size of the photos below were reduced. Annotation was added and GPS information was removed. No other changes were made.)

    IMG_3383 (reduced size, added annotation, removed GPS infomation).jpg IMG_3384 (reduced size, added annotation, removed GPS infomation).jpg
    IMG_3387 (reduced size, added annotation, removed GPS infomation).jpg IMG_3388 (reduced size, added annotation, removed GPS infomation).jpg

    Do you have this issue as well or do you think it's a software issue which will be fixed in iOS 6? Thanks in advance.
     
  2. pyroo macrumors member

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2007
    #2
    You moved, you have to keep really still if you are taking photos that close using HDR
     
  3. Mic'sBook thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2010
    Location:
    Hong Kong
    #3
    Thanks for your reply and I know what you mean. But I didn't move when taking the above photos. I just can't figure out why this happens.
     
  4. pyroo macrumors member

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2007
    #4
    Try taking a scenery picture and see if it still happens?
     
  5. Mic'sBook thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2010
    Location:
    Hong Kong
    #5
    Thanks for your reply. It won't happen when taking scenery photos. It happens only when taking photos with lots of grids, straight lines, etc.
     
  6. thomamon macrumors 6502a

    thomamon

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2008
    Location:
    Flemington, NJ
    #6
    Good thing you don't take a lot of pictures of straight lines and grids...
     
  7. Mic'sBook thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2010
    Location:
    Hong Kong
  8. dotme macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2011
    Location:
    Iowa
    #8
    Yes. You're asking the iPhone to decide between lining up the lines on the image, and the lines on your monitor

    Psychic capabilities won't be included until iOS8.

    Take a sheet of ruled notepaper, draw some lines that intersect the ruled lines, and take an HDR photo of it.
     
  9. Mic'sBook thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2010
    Location:
    Hong Kong
    #9
    The culprit is grids and straight lines. You may say it's the pixels on the display that confuse the iPhone 4's camera and its HDR algorithm. But take a look at these 2 photos (one normal; one HDR). They suffer from this issue either and they have nothing to do with pixels on the display as you said:

    (The size of the photos below were reduced. Annotation was added and GPS information was removed. No other changes were made.)

    IMG_2294 (reduced size, added annotation, removed GPS information).jpg IMG_2295 (reduced size, added annotation, removed GPS information).jpg

    I didn't move when I was taking this photo. I know the escalators were moving so don't count the people on the left and right. But do take a look at the sign in the middle, the metal lines of the moving stairs, the rubbish bins at the far end and the seams of the glass panes.
     
  10. Cynikal.Mindset macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2010
    Location:
    Guelph ON, Canada
    #10
    personally I think this is a case of user error.
     
  11. CyBeRino macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2011
    #11
    See if this still happens while you aren't holding the camera at all. That is, the camera is laying down on a flat surface with the lens just over a ledge or something.

    A coffee table with something under it to photograph would do.
     

Share This Page