HEEEEEELLLLLPPPP can't find ssd after update!!!!

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by schpongo, Apr 20, 2011.

  1. schpongo macrumors member

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2011
    #1
    It has been a couple of days since i dai a update on my mid 2007 macbook. After the update was finished the system normally restarts, but mine didn't i waited and waited but nothing. So i decided to hit the power button until my macbook turned off. I started again, the stat up chime came but then a flashing question mark folder appeared. So i got my leopard disc and started of it and went into disk utility but my ssd ( vertex limited edition 100gb) was not shown there. So i took the ssd out of my macbook put an old backup in it and started up. It worked so i put my ssd in a case but it didn't show up again. So i tried another case with no success. Since then i ve been looking for solution with no success.
    Does anyone have any ideas, all ideas are greatly appreciated!!!
    Please HELP
     
  2. Makosuke macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2001
    Location:
    The Cool Part of CA, USA
    #2
    Well, if it doesn't appear at all when attached directly to the SATA bus, or in either of two different cases, it seems pretty obvious that your SSD suffered a catastrophic failure. Assuming so, it's dead, period--I hope you have a recent backup.

    If it's under warranty it should be easy to get it replaced, though.

    Just to confirm, when you booted from the instal DVD and opened disk utility, the SSD didn't show up at all in the left column, as opposed to showing the hardware but no associated volume, correct? If there is no hardware at all shown in Disk Utility, the drive is almost certainly dead.
     
  3. schpongo thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2011
    #3
    Thx for the answer.
    No the sdd didn't show up. Luckily i still have warranty unlucky me i haven't made a back up since like 3 months because i really didn't expect my ssd to fail (why do i have to have a ssd which fails only 1% of all ssd fail why mee?). I don't suppose there is any way i can get any of my data back?
     
  4. Makosuke macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2001
    Location:
    The Cool Part of CA, USA
    #4
    With a flaky rotating hard drive there are a few tricks you can use to extract data from it, but since yours isn't even showing up, the controller probably failed, which means you're completely out of luck. You can't even try the never-really-works desperation measure of swapping controller boards like on a rotating hard drive, since everything is soldered on one circuit board. There's always data recovery houses, but I don't know if they've started working on SSDs yet, and even if they have you're talking about hundreds if not thousands of dollars in recovery costs.

    First, 100% of all SSDs will fail if you use them long enough. It's a physical object, it WILL break eventually.

    I don't know where you got your 1% number, but given the comparatively tiny number of SSDs being purchased compared to traditional hard drives, and the fact that they've only been a widely-available consumer product for maybe a couple of years, if that, there are NO real-world long-term reliability stats worth anything at all for SSDs, period. Heck, there have only been a couple of good publicly available real-world studies of rotating hard drive reliability, and the entire modern world relies on those.

    While SSDs have no moving parts, the controller itself is just as susceptible to failure as that on any regular hard drive, and the same goes for power electronics and other parts. Further, given that most of the companies making SSDs--even big ones like OCZ--have only been in the market a few years (versus as much as three decades for a company like Seagate, and well over a decade even for off-brand drive makers like Samsung), the technology is a LOT less mature than rotating hard drives.

    Not to say that SSDs are unreliable, just that nobody knows how reliable they'll really end up being in the wild, and that the companies making them have a comparatively short track record and experience in the field compared to the massive hard drive market. "It'll last forever!" or "No moving parts!" doesn't in any way equal real-world reliability, and even if it did there's always bad luck.
     
  5. Alaerian Guest

    Alaerian

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2005
    Location:
    A barstool, Innis & Gunn in hand
    #5
    Offtopic:
    Please don't use thread titles like that.
     
  6. schpongo thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2011
    #6
    Thx for the reply.
    Ya i thought that there wouldn't be much hope for my ssd and since i live in Germany , there aren't too many companies which recover data at least were i live.
    But theres a moral to this sad sad story back up ur data
     

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