Help: Cannot upgrade fro Tiger to Leopard

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by marcel-v, Mar 13, 2008.

  1. marcel-v macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2006
    #1
    Hi, I just got my Leopard upgrade disk and run into trouble at the very start of the installation. I get an error message (similar to) that I do not have the correct installment of Tiger, yet I have version 10.4.11

    Has anyone run into this problem or knows how to help?
    Thanks.
     
  2. patrick0brien macrumors 68040

    patrick0brien

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2002
    Location:
    The West Loop
    #2
    -marcel-v

    Hmm, sounds like it may be having issues updating the kernel.

    Does it still boot into 10.4.11?

    This will work, I hope you have an external drive.

    1. Get SuperDuper! or Carbon Copy Cloner.
    2. Clone your drive to it.
    3. boot from your external drive to test the boot volume's viability - if booting is fine, go to the next step, otherwise, wipe the external with disk utility, using the security feature "Write Zeros to Disk"
    4. Still booted into the external boot volume, open Disk Utility and using the security feature "Write Zeros to Disk" to the internal drive - the one you are wanting to upgrade to Leopard.
    5. After the wipe is complete (should take 1.5-2 hours depending on disk size), insert Leopard disk, and follow the instructions - targetting your internal drive for the install - make it a 'Clean' "Easy" install.
    6. at a certain point in the installation, Leopard will ask you if you want to migrate user accounts and settings from another computer or volume - have it go after your external clone.
    7. Let it finish
    8. restart into Leopard, deny Leopard's desire to turn your clone drive into a Time Machine backup for now. Test the system to your liking, everything should be just fine.
    9. When you are comfortable with how Leopard is behaving, wipe your clone, and tell Leopard it is your Time Machine backup

    *10. you may just want to do this anyway - Leopard intoduces ACL (Access Control Lists), they can get a little wonky - esp after a Leopard migration.

    DO THIS ONLY IF YOU ARE COMFORTABLE WITH ROOT, AND KNOW THE DANGERS OF SCREWING AROUND IN IT

    1. Open Terminal, the prompt should indicate you are at the root of your user account.
    2. enter "sudo chmod -R -N ." (copy/paste that if you like). This strips all ACLs within your user directory. It will ask for your administrators password
    3. Now you need to do this to your Applications folder, enter "cd /Applications", you should see the focus of the prompt change to "Applications", run the command again: "sudo chmod -R -N .". If you didn't quit terminal, it will not ask you for your password this time - it's already entered.
    4. Restart, everything should be wonderul.
     

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