HELP! I drowned my brand new MacBook!

mapleleaftattoo

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Sep 27, 2006
2
0
My waterbottle opened in my backpack, dousing my (closed and off) MacBook with 1/2 liter of water. I waited about 52 hrs before turning it on, heated it a little and used the blow drier. I let it drain. When I turned it on, everything was fine except the screen was really dark. I could still see what was on the screen, but it was like the background light was off. I tried increasing brightness, but nothing helped.

Did the light short circuit? Can that be replaced? I bought the expensive $250 Apple Care warranty, will that cover it if I don't say I spilled h2o all over it?:eek:
 

ZoomZoomZoom

macrumors 6502a
May 2, 2005
767
0
Applecare doesn't cover accidental damage :( And they'll probably be able to tell that it was flooded. Best of luck though.
 

BurtonCCC

macrumors 65816
May 2, 2005
1,005
0
Wheaton/Normal, IL
mapleleaftattoo said:
How much does it cost to replace the background light in the MacBook display?
A few days ago, a G3 PowerBook came into the Campus Apple Store I work at with a backlight out, but the image still viewable on the screen like your situation. Of course the computer didn't have a warranty anymore (much like your computer :( ), so in that case, I believe Apple needed to replace the entire screen, not just the light. You are looking at a very costly repair, most likely.

There definitely is a much greater responsibility when owning a Mac because with the beauty of the machines, they can be damaged very easily. Please be more careful in the future. I know it was an accident, but Mac owners anticipate that things like that might happen and make sure there's no possible chance.

Sorry for your loss. Hopefully something's different in the G3 example I gave you and your MacBook so they don't have to replace the entire screen.

Good luck and please keep us updated.

Daniel.
 

Superdrive

macrumors 6502a
Oct 21, 2003
762
26
Dallas, Tx
BurtonCCC said:
There definitely is a much greater responsibility when owning a Mac because with the beauty of the machines, they can be damaged very easily.
I have a feeling that the problem the OP is experiencing is not Mac specific. The iBook/MacBook are some of the most durable notebooks out there, but they aren't invincible. This is a tough break, and I understand the feeling of breaking a new expensive toy, hopefully for the OP, it can be taken care of without too much issue.
 

BurtonCCC

macrumors 65816
May 2, 2005
1,005
0
Wheaton/Normal, IL
Superdrive said:
I have a feeling that the problem the OP is experiencing is not Mac specific. The iBook/MacBook are some of the most durable notebooks out there, but they aren't invincible. This is a tough break, and I understand the feeling of breaking a new expensive toy, hopefully for the OP, it can be taken care of without too much issue.
Maybe I wasn't clear in my post. Sorry about that. I meant that with an expensive AND beautiful toy like a Mac, there's more of a responsibility to FORSEE accidents than there would be with something like a Dell, which has the capability to be expensive, but rarely beautiful. So I was assuming (maybe incorrectly?) that the OP is a new switcher to Mac and I just wanted him to understand the with a Mac, you have a machine that's worth the extra time and care taken to ANTICIPATE accidents and prevent them. For instance, you would never in a million years catch me having water in the same compartment of a backpack with a Mac. Probably not even in a separate compartment. I think that's common sense to an experienced Mac user, but now I'm seeing that I'm being quite unfair. It's what I believe though.

Daniel.
 

notjustjay

macrumors 603
Sep 19, 2003
6,042
111
Canada, eh?
BurtonCCC said:
There definitely is a much greater responsibility when owning a Mac because with the beauty of the machines, they can be damaged very easily. Please be more careful in the future. I know it was an accident, but Mac owners anticipate that things like that might happen and make sure there's no possible chance.
Nice. What, and PC owners routinely spill drinks all over their machines, because hey, they were ugly to begin with?

I see no correlation between "the beauty of the machines" and "they can be damaged very easily". All laptops are delicate machines, with the possible exception of those specifically designed to take abuse. I like to believe that Apple's machines are beautiful AND functional. :p

Nor do I see how "Mac owners anticipate these things" any more than PC users do, as a rule. I know you're appealing to his sensibilities and the general pride of ownership that comes with paying the premium (yes) for a Mac. Sure, we all want to baby our Macs. But accidents can and do happen, and essentially saying that Macs are somehow more delicate and that somehow "the REST of us anticipate these things and make sure there's no possible chance" is not helpful to the OP in the least.
 

Abstract

macrumors Penryn
Dec 27, 2002
24,386
112
Location Location Location
^^Yeah, unfair. Add unrealistic to the list. :p

If I paid a lot of money for a computer from ANY company, I'd feel gutted that my computer is dead. I'd also treat any computer I own well. It's not a matter of brand. They're all expensive, and they all hold files and work that are valuable to use, regardless of whether it's a Dell or HP or Apple.
 

Bill Gates

macrumors 68030
Jun 21, 2006
2,500
14
127.0.0.1
BurtonCCC said:
Maybe I wasn't clear in my post. Sorry about that. I meant that with an expensive AND beautiful toy like a Mac, there's more of a responsibility to FORSEE accidents than there would be with something like a Dell, which has the capability to be expensive, but rarely beautiful. So I was assuming (maybe incorrectly?) that the OP is a new switcher to Mac and I just wanted him to understand the with a Mac, you have a machine that's worth the extra time and care taken to ANTICIPATE accidents and prevent them. For instance, you would never in a million years catch me having water in the same compartment of a backpack with a Mac. Probably not even in a separate compartment. I think that's common sense to an experienced Mac user, but now I'm seeing that I'm being quite unfair. It's what I believe though.

Daniel.
That's just tomfoolery. To think you'd take better care of one computer over another due to aesthetics. Whether Mac or PC, both put significant dents in your wallet.
 

BurtonCCC

macrumors 65816
May 2, 2005
1,005
0
Wheaton/Normal, IL
Bill Gates said:
That's just tomfoolery. To think you'd take better care of one computer over another due to aesthetics. Whether Mac or PC, both put significant dents in your wallet.
Okay, I'm not expressing myself clearly. I don't know how else to explain it. :confused: Just forget I said anything.

Daniel.
 

sierra oscar

macrumors 6502
Apr 23, 2006
254
1
South Australia, Australia
BurtonCCC said:
There definitely is a much greater responsibility when owning a Mac because with the beauty of the machines, they can be damaged very easily. Please be more careful in the future. I know it was an accident, but Mac owners anticipate that things like that might happen and make sure there's no possible chance.Daniel.
I would have to agree with you here Daniel - there is something about portable PC users who seem to throw these machines about the place. I don't know of any mac user who would do the same.

Whilst I treat all things in my possession with great care - when I borrow a PC I don't feel the need to baby it as much. If I borrow a mac portable - it's treated (in my mind) like a precious metal.

Now... does that mean - PC's are more robust? or ... we all value our Mac's more? Not sure what the answer is there.

Sorry to hear about your water accident mapleleaf - sounds like you did all the right things post incident - ring apple repair and see what the quote is. This is common though - water bottles leaking in bags - I see many soggy books and ruined assignments this way. Always use the ext water holders in bags if you can next time.
 

XP Defector

macrumors 6502
Apr 5, 2006
492
0
On my last night out as a Student, I awoke in the Morning to find that I had urinated all over my Dell Inspiron. The Insprion was open, sitting on my desk and it was switched on lol. Well, after a couple of months I got a MacBook to replace it for nothing, so it wasn't all bad :D
 

skunk

macrumors G4
Jun 29, 2002
11,744
4,016
Republic of Ukistan
XP Defector said:
On my last night out as a Student, I awoke in the Morning to find that I had urinated all over my Dell Inspiron. The Insprion was open, sitting on my desk and it was switched on lol. Well, after a couple of months I got a MacBook to replace it for nothing, so it wasn't all bad :D
Aptly enough I misread your username as XP Defecator. :p
 

MIDI_EVIL

macrumors 65816
Jan 23, 2006
1,320
13
UK
Unfortunately, i don't see Apple lending a helping hand here.

You will probably find more luck claiming on your household insurance.

Sorry to hear about what happened, that really is not good.

Rich.
 

iGary

Guest
May 26, 2004
19,583
0
Randy's House
... does that mean - PC's are more robust? or ... we all value our Mac's more? Not sure what the answer is there.
Because Mac's are like art. People like to keep them looking as beautiful as the day they bought them. The people at the Apple Store looked me like I was crazy when I bought my PM in wrapped in two blankets.
 

gkhaldi

macrumors regular
Feb 6, 2005
111
0
Just phone Applecare and tell them that your Macbook started leaking an unknown liquid substance and that you would like to know what to do :D :rolleyes: ;)

EDIT: Sorry for the loss. It's painfull to c something ****** like that happen to a beloved piece of equipment
 

GoCubsGo

macrumors Nehalem
Feb 19, 2005
35,753
142
notjustjay said:
Nice. What, and PC owners routinely spill drinks all over their machines, because hey, they were ugly to begin with?

I see no correlation between "the beauty of the machines" and "they can be damaged very easily". All laptops are delicate machines, with the possible exception of those specifically designed to take abuse. I like to believe that Apple's machines are beautiful AND functional. :p

Nor do I see how "Mac owners anticipate these things" any more than PC users do, as a rule. I know you're appealing to his sensibilities and the general pride of ownership that comes with paying the premium (yes) for a Mac. Sure, we all want to baby our Macs. But accidents can and do happen, and essentially saying that Macs are somehow more delicate and that somehow "the REST of us anticipate these things and make sure there's no possible chance" is not helpful to the OP in the least.
I could not agree with you more. I hate to see what happened with the water and the OP, but seriously to shelter yourself or think you will shelter yourself from this is silly. I had no liquid in my bag and somehow there was some condensation from the floor of a small commuter plane I was on. I walked off the plane and my backpack (photo+laptop) was wet on the bottom. I did have it in a sleeve and there is about an inch of padding there, but still, I was worried. Should I not fly with a Mac? Doubtful.
 

generik

macrumors 601
Aug 5, 2005
4,116
1
Minitrue
iGary said:
Because Mac's are like art. People like to keep them looking as beautiful as the day they bought them. The people at the Apple Store looked me like I was crazy when I bought my PM in wrapped in two blankets.
Then moments later they take it from you telling you "We'll take it from here", and pushed it across their workbench :D
 

wasimyaqoob

macrumors 6502a
Dec 23, 2005
577
1
London, England.
Its so true, i've dropped my HP laptop many times and didnt bother replacing it or repairing it.

But as soon as I bought my Powerbook and I dropped it, i spent £400 sorting the bottom casing out