Help me choose my iMac

griftopia

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Apr 7, 2016
7
0
This is for someone who launches apps and NEVER closes them. Launches browser, and keeps adding tabs, never closing them. Someone who only browses internet, checks emails, watches youtube, listens to music and does not really ever run any kind of productivity software like office.

Someone who for the life of me cannot do with 8GB RAM!!!

So 16GB RAM and everything else pretty much the same. The main difference...

a) Core 2 Duo 3.06 Ghz + 500 GB SSD
b) i3 3.06 Ghz + 500 GB HDD

One has faster CPU, other has SSD

I was thinking a), but after looking at other posts on the forum, I'm not quite sure any more. If the price point is roughly the same give or take $20, which one would you choose?

HELP!
 

Lankyman

macrumors 68000
May 14, 2011
1,927
711
U.K.
You would be better served my going for the i3 Mac Mini. It's all the computer you're ever going to need.
 

Fishrrman

macrumors P6
Feb 20, 2009
17,405
5,638
"This is for someone who launches apps and NEVER closes them. Launches browser, and keeps adding tabs, never closing them. Someone who only browses internet, checks emails, watches youtube, listens to music and does not really ever run any kind of productivity software like office."

You didn't ask for advice like this, but I'm going to offer it anyway.
Try closing apps you're done with and won't use again for a while.
Try closing tabs that you're not going to look at again for a while (few hours, etc.)

Things will just run better that way. Try it and see.

As Lankyman said, a 2018 Mac Mini i3 would do you fine.
BUT ... get the 16gb of RAM pre-installed from the factory.
And get the 512gb SSD.
 

sunapple

macrumors 68000
Jul 16, 2013
1,884
2,783
The Netherlands
I'm guessing we're comparing the 21.5" iMacs from 2009 and 2010? It's been a while since I've heard the '3.06Ghz' figure lol.

SDD will help a lot with everyday usage, I'd choose SSD over HDD.

However, only Late 2012 iMacs and later are supported by the latest macOS 10.14 Mojave. I wouldn't recommend buying a computer that's not supported anymore. Of course, I realize this has to do with pricing, but I'm saying it anyway.
 

griftopia

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Apr 7, 2016
7
0
"This is for someone who launches apps and NEVER closes them. Launches browser, and keeps adding tabs, never closing them. Someone who only browses internet, checks emails, watches youtube, listens to music and does not really ever run any kind of productivity software like office."

You didn't ask for advice like this, but I'm going to offer it anyway.
Try closing apps you're done with and won't use again for a while.
Try closing tabs that you're not going to look at again for a while (few hours, etc.)

Things will just run better that way. Try it and see.

As Lankyman said, a 2018 Mac Mini i3 would do you fine.
BUT ... get the 16gb of RAM pre-installed from the factory.
And get the 512gb SSD.
First, believe it or not, the Mac mini is costing me more.
Second, and more importantly, your advice is well taken. However, please understand the *someone* I'm referring is happens to be (a) someone I love to death and (b) not someone one argues with. If you get my drift ;)

I can control which computer I can buy for her. I wouldn't dream of changing her behavior.

I'm trying to find out which setup will work faster. Does the faster CPU trump the SSD everything else remaining the same?
[doublepost=1549067604][/doublepost]
i3 with HDD, then swap out for SSD.
I am not comfortable with mucking around with an iMac or of course I would do that.
[doublepost=1549067770][/doublepost]
I'm guessing we're comparing the 21.5" iMacs from 2009 and 2010? It's been a while since I've heard the '3.06Ghz' figure lol.

SDD will help a lot with everyday usage, I'd choose SSD over HDD.

However, only Late 2012 iMacs and later are supported by the latest macOS 10.14 Mojave. I wouldn't recommend buying a computer that's not supported anymore. Of course, I realize this has to do with pricing, but I'm saying it anyway.
You are correct. I'm not too worried about the MacOS support because plan to dual boot with Windows and will be used mostly with Windows
 

sunapple

macrumors 68000
Jul 16, 2013
1,884
2,783
The Netherlands
First, believe it or not, the Mac mini is costing me more.
Second, and more importantly, your advice is well taken. However, please understand the *someone* I'm referring is happens to be (a) someone I love to death and (b) not someone one argues with. If you get my drift ;)

I can control which computer I can buy for her. I wouldn't dream of changing her behavior.

I'm trying to find out which setup will work faster. Does the faster CPU trump the SSD everything else remaining the same?
[doublepost=1549067604][/doublepost]
I am not comfortable with mucking around with an iMac or of course I would do that.
[doublepost=1549067770][/doublepost]
You are correct. I'm not too worried about the MacOS support because plan to dual boot with Windows and will be used mostly with Windows
Oh, okay. In that case, make sure the version of Windows you want to use is compatible. Quick research tells me that for Windows 10 64-bit you also need a 2012 iMac or later... https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT201468
 

griftopia

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Apr 7, 2016
7
0
Oh, okay. In that case, make sure the version of Windows you want to use is compatible. Quick research tells me that for Windows 10 64-bit you also need a 2012 iMac or later... https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT201468
I am typing this reply on a 2009 iMac dual booted with Windows 10 :)

Just because Apple does not official support does not mean you cannot install. Matter of fact I had absolutely no issues installing with BootCamp. All I did was instead of using my Windows 7 CD, I used my Windows 10 CD. Then just downloaded BootCamp drivers from Apple website. Everything works in Windows.

Initially I had 3 GB in the machine and 64 bit did not install. With 5 GB I was able to. I guess machine needs 4 GB before 64 bit will install.
 

sunapple

macrumors 68000
Jul 16, 2013
1,884
2,783
The Netherlands
I am typing this reply on a 2009 iMac dual booted with Windows 10 :)

Just because Apple does not official support does not mean you cannot install. Matter of fact I had absolutely no issues installing with BootCamp. All I did was instead of using my Windows 7 CD, I used my Windows 10 CD. Then just downloaded BootCamp drivers from Apple website. Everything works in Windows.

Initially I had 3 GB in the machine and 64 bit did not install. With 5 GB I was able to. I guess machine needs 4 GB before 64 bit will install.
Cool. It really wasn’t very extensive research that I did ;).

The SSD still trumps processors IMO, mainly because they’re both pretty slow anyway.
 

briloronmacrumo

macrumors 6502
Jan 25, 2008
464
271
USA
Get the SSD, get as much memory as the budget will permit and get a recently made machine ( the 3.06 GHz sounds like a 2009/10 iMac. Those old iMacs will be having hardware issues and the person you describe doesn't sound like someone who wants to navigate them.) If you're capable of doing hardware tweaks, purchase a base machine and do the memory and SSD upgrade yourself.