Help me pick a drive for my Drobo...

Discussion in 'Buying Tips and Advice' started by goodcow, Aug 15, 2008.

  1. TuffLuffJimmy macrumors G3

    TuffLuffJimmy

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    #2
    What are you using the drobo for (why do you need so much storage?) and what model drobo did you get?
     
  2. goodcow thread starter macrumors 6502a

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    #3
    I just bought the new FW800 Drobo.

    It'll be used as an all purpose storage vault and easy backup. Right now I have about a half dozen externals, daisy-chained on firewire, ranging from 250-750GB. The 750GB one, which has the most important data has a duplicate 750GB drive which I sync it to often.

    So the idea is to basically consolidate, forget about backing up since it'll do it for me, and have expanded storage.

    Reliability is key for me here, not so much performance.
     
  3. TuffLuffJimmy macrumors G3

    TuffLuffJimmy

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    #4
    really any of those drives will do. Are you getting four terabyte drives?
     
  4. goodcow thread starter macrumors 6502a

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    #5
    Yeah, four 1TB's.

    I like that the Seagate's have 5-year warranties over WD's 3-year. Plus, when I called both companies today with questions, Seagate had American tech support whereas WD had Indian support.

    But, NewEggers say Seagate charges $20 per drive to RMA while WD will cross-ship free.
     
  5. TuffLuffJimmy macrumors G3

    TuffLuffJimmy

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    #6
    Then it comes down to what you personally value more. The drives, most likely, will give you the same performance.

    Personally I would get two of one and two of the other. That way there is less of a chance of them all failing at the same time.
     
  6. brand macrumors 601

    brand

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    #7
    I would rethink that strategy. The Drobo does not backup your data. It protects against a single hard drive failure, if more than one drive is present, but does not backup anything.
     
  7. TuffLuffJimmy macrumors G3

    TuffLuffJimmy

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    #8
    Well it protects against data loss, which most people think is backing up. Either way it'll do what he wants.
     
  8. mrwizardno2 macrumors 6502a

    mrwizardno2

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    #9
    I would agree with Brand here. RAID != Backup

    What if a file goes corrupt? That isn't recoverable on a RAID, but would be via a backup.
     
  9. goodcow thread starter macrumors 6502a

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    #10
    Well, it is backing up.

    Although I am considering using JungleDisk and Amazon S3 for some offsite storage.
     
  10. TuffLuffJimmy macrumors G3

    TuffLuffJimmy

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    #11
    No. a drobo is for data redundancy, it is not meant for backing up.
     
  11. mrwizardno2 macrumors 6502a

    mrwizardno2

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    #12
    It really isn't, though. Are you saying you will have copies of the files on the drobo elsewhere, as well? Just because that data is "raid"ed for lack of a better word, doesn't mean it is redundant. A backup, or second copy would be redundant. I think you know what you want, and I don't think redundancy is on that list, correct? You just want a relatively safe means of pooled storage all in one spot?
     
  12. TuffLuffJimmy macrumors G3

    TuffLuffJimmy

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    #13
    This is a little off topic, but why is Drobo not considered RAID?

    It seems like it fits with "Redundant Array of Independent Disks"
     
  13. goodcow thread starter macrumors 6502a

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    #14
    I understand what you guys are saying and I'm aware of that.

    But I'm not a corporation or business with tape drive backups that rotates them offsite on a regular basis.

    For the vast majority of people who just want their data at home safe, then data redundancy (i.e. RAID) = "backed up." Especially at a volume of 2.7TB (after redundancy) where secondary optical backups are impractical and even if I had a second physical Drobo, it still wouldn't keep my data safe if there were say, a fire. But again, I don't have the resources to keep all this data in a second complete copy elsewhere like a corporation.
     
  14. EricNau Moderator emeritus

    EricNau

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    #15
    It can be used, with time machine or another piece of software, in order to redundantly store a system backup, if that's what you're looking for.
     
  15. mrwizardno2 macrumors 6502a

    mrwizardno2

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    #16
    I think it actually is RAID. But what we're talking about is the redundancy of the data on the disk. Say we have an ISO of a dvd on a RAID - it is either striped / spanned / mirrored on the raid. It exists 1 time on the raid.

    On a backup, we have 2 instances. One on the storage medium used for read / write. The other on the backup medium meant for archival / disaster purposes.

    A raid really should never be considered a "backup" of anything.


    EDIT: I get what you are saying. backup = good enough. :)
     
  16. goodcow thread starter macrumors 6502a

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    #17
    Can we please go back to debating the pros/cons of the two drives I've selected? :p
     
  17. johnny10 macrumors newbie

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    Aug 17, 2008
    #18
  18. Lougle macrumors member

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