Help on a Slow(er) MBP - Does a Defrag/Clean Up exist or?

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by Peter Franks, Sep 5, 2013.

  1. Peter Franks macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2011
    Location:
    London UK
    #1
    Processor Name: Intel Core i5
    Processor Speed: 2.3 GHz
    10.6.8
    SL

    Hey guys and girls, Can someone let me know if, after I've deleted about 100GB of stuff as I was down to my last 20GB on my 320GB MBP, is there anything like there used to be on my old Win PC, to clean up after, or do you just not bother.

    I didn't secure empty, which takes forever, delete, I just emptied trash, but because it's so instant you can't help but feel there is more I should/can do to clean up after deleting so much data?

    I know it won't be as fast as it was when I bought it 2 and half years ago, but by now, should I be doing anything to speed it up after a clean out?
     
  2. simsaladimbamba

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2010
    Location:
    located
    #2
    Where do your speed problems occur?
    If you want to enhance the performance of your Mac, be sure to check these two articles, do not just use applications, that promise to do it for you.
    Normally there is no need for defragging, as the file system takes care of that.
    Once I scanned several HDDs with iDefrag, those HDDs gone through lots of copying and deleting files and folders and the most fragmentation iDefrag found was around 2%.

    Articles explaining why Mac OS X does not need maintenance software like CCleaner, MacKeeper or CleanMyMac:
     
  3. Peter Franks thread starter macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2011
    Location:
    London UK
    #3
    thanks... I did check that stuff out.

    I thought after the offload of stuff, the start up would be back to where it was too but it isn't.

    Do you think the secure delete makes a difference and actually removes the stuff, and makes the space, rather than just an empty trash where the stuff is still on there?
     
  4. tmagman macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2010
    Location:
    Calgary AB
    #4
    There's always little pockets of junk here and there that build up on your machine. Whenever I do significant deleting or even just annually when I'm starting to find my machine is a little sluggish, i just do a clean wipe and install of everything. It doesn't take that long and I definitely notice the difference.
     
  5. Peter Franks thread starter macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2011
    Location:
    London UK
    #5
    Don't know I could trust myself to do that. Wouldn't know where to start to be honest
     
  6. notjustjay macrumors 603

    notjustjay

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2003
    Location:
    Canada, eh?
    #6
    Often a good time to do that sort of thing is when deciding to upgrade to a bigger hard drive anyway.

    When I took the 120 GB drive out of my MacBook Pro and replaced it with a 750 GB drive, I also upgraded the OS (Snow Leopard, at the time). Then I took my old drive and put it inside an external USB enclosure, plugged it in, and copied over the files I needed. I reinstalled most of my apps from scratch as well.

    This way I got rid of all the old apps and files I don't actively use (if I don't use it anymore, it didn't get reinstalled) but I still have a full backup of everything on the old drive, which is now an external USB drive, in case I need it later.
     
  7. Peter Franks thread starter macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2011
    Location:
    London UK
    #7
    Typically. I think it was barely a couple of months after I bought it that they stopped the 320 in favour of the 500GB...
     
  8. benwiggy macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2012
    #8
    Assuming that you have at least 10% free space on your hard drive, "stuff on my disk" nor "time passed" should not of itself cause your computer to be be slower.
    Having apps that you don't use, or pref files for deleted apps will not affect your computer one bit.

    Some perceived slowness over time is likely to be because of an increase in tasks -- you simply do more with your Mac, using newer software, bigger files, more data; and you yourself have become more adept at getting your computer to do stuff.

    If it's not that, then you need to look at Activity Monitor, and see what processes are taking up CPU% and RAM. Then investigate from there.
     
  9. Peter Franks, Sep 7, 2013
    Last edited: Sep 7, 2013

    Peter Franks thread starter macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2011
    Location:
    London UK
    #9
    Help on a Slow(er) MBP - Does a Defrag/Clean Up exist or?

    thanks, I just remember hearing that no matter how much you remove from an old Puter or Phone, once it's a few years old, the hard drive is knackered. Not saying this is what's happened now, because it's only at 2 and a half years old stage, but eventually, clearing out won't make a difference anyway

    It's certainly true of my 2 year 7 month old iPhone 4. That freezes and slows up and is as buggy as it gets now.
     
  10. benwiggy macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2012
    #10
    Utter nonsense. Firstly, iPhones and Macs have completely different storage technologies.
    Mechanical hard drives will work consistently until they fail. Some will fail after a few years, some will keep trucking for 10 years.

    SSDs can fail too -- technology is improving, but there's little long-term data on each new type, of course.

    I have an iPhone 4 that's just over 3 years old that works fine. I've have hard drives on Mac last over six years -- which tends to be when I get rid of the whole computer in favour of a new one. My dad still has G4 PowerMacs with the original hard drives, still working every day.
     
  11. Fishrrman macrumors G4

    Fishrrman

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2009
    #11
    [[ Hey guys and girls, Can someone let me know if, after I've deleted about 100GB of stuff as I was down to my last 20GB on my 320GB MBP, is there anything like there used to be on my old Win PC, to clean up after, or do you just not bother. ]]

    Actually, the best "speed up" of all would be to replace the existing HDD with an SSD.

    You don't need anything fancy if it's an older MacBook Pro.

    Even a smaller-capacity SSD will breathe a couple of years of new life into the computer...
     
  12. Peter Franks thread starter macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2011
    Location:
    London UK
    #12
    I said puters, not Macs... not nonsense, my previous Samsung laptop ground to a halt after a few years, even with a half empty HD. But if you say that Apple is different then good, pleased to hear it. I would like to think it won't happen like that on here. It's not yet 3 years old. Is SSD a better bet for speed though


    Is this something I can do, or ..... and how long will it take if I took it into an Apple store for a new SSD? Bearing in mind I haven't a clue..
     
  13. simsaladimbamba

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2010
    Location:
    located
    #13
    MacBook, MacBook Pro: Replacing the Hard Disk Drive, transferring data to the new HDD

    the guide includes:
    • 0. Identify your MacBook or MacBook Pro
    • 1. Getting a new HDD
    • 2. Guides to replace the internal HDD with a newer one
    • 3. Transferring data from the old HDD to the new HDD
    • 4. Using the optical disk drive (ODD) slot for placing an SSD or HDD inside the MB/P (OPTIBAY)
     
  14. benwiggy, Sep 10, 2013
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2013

    benwiggy macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2012
    #14
    Hard drives are made by the same people for Macs and other PCs. There's no difference between them. Just because you had a drive that failed after a few years, doesn't mean that every drive will do so.

    Whether a hard drive will fail or not is a lottery. Things like vibration, shock, humidity, excessive usage are not going to help, but some drives will cope and some won't. You'll find stories here of brand new Macs with failing drives, and others that last for aeons.

    When you say "Even with a half-empty drive", this suggests that there's a link between amount of stuff on a drive and whether it's going to fail. There isn't.

    SSDs can also fail, and usually more totally and catastrophically than HDDs. The important thing is to expect drives to fail, and have a backup. ;-)
     
  15. Peter Franks thread starter macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2011
    Location:
    London UK
    #15
    Thanks for your help. I understand more now. I did think fuller HDs would influence the death of the machines. Yep
     
  16. xlii macrumors 68000

    xlii

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2006
    Location:
    Millis, Massachusetts
    #16
    I have a 13" 2009 MBP and over time I've added a 1 TB drive and 8 GB of memory. Started with 10.6.8 and am now on 10.8.4. Never had an issue with it getting slower over time. It's time for me to get an SSD, remove the superdrive (which is no longer so super) and create a fusion drive.

    To the OP... how much memory does your machine have? That might be an issue. Both the memory and the HDD are easily upgradable and something you can do yourself.

    You need to decide how much money you want to put into your machine.
    More memory...
    Larger HDD...
    SSD...

    are all options for you to consider.
     
  17. charlituna macrumors G3

    charlituna

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2008
    Location:
    Los Angeles, CA
    #17
    There are a lot of things that can cause a computer to slow down

    1. Yes it could be that the hard drive is beginning to fail. Hard sometimes to call that one but we backup our stuff so it shouldn't be a big issue
    2. Too little RAM. What was okay when you bought the computer might not be okay now with new software. Especially with a newer OS
    3. Not enough space on the hard drive to have enough for virtual memory to work well
    4. Corrupted software. Similar in effect to a fragmented drive, over time all those bits of data get shuffled in and out and can get a little scrambled
    5. If it's a portable it could be a worn out battery if it's particularly old

    Make sure your backup is current. Try simply turning off the computer and letting it sit for about five minutes to make sure it is completely off. Then power it back on. Sometimes that's enough. Otherwise it might be time to reinstall the OS or even do a complete erase and install. If those don't work, seek professional help for testing the hard drive and battery.
     
  18. Yell0w macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2008
    #18
    I have a 200GB early 2008 MBP, then upgraded to a SSD. It was day and night difference.
     
  19. Peter Franks thread starter macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2011
    Location:
    London UK
    #19
    thanks but doing those things myself is just asking for a disaster...

    Sadly, I couldn't even reinstall the OS, I just don't know how to. As for switching off, I turn it off wheneve I'm not using it, never leave it on.

    this is 2011 and I think I bought it just before the upgraded versions...
     

Share This Page