Help on installing new HDD in MacBook Pro

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by smallnshort247, Dec 12, 2010.

  1. smallnshort247 macrumors 6502a

    smallnshort247

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2010
    #1
    Hey guys,

    I've done a good amount of research and I think I understand pretty well how to install a new hard drive in my 2010 i5 MacBook Pro. I've installed RAM in it earlier, so opening the case up doesn't really scare me that much. The only thing I'm a bit confused on is what to do after the hard drive is installed. I've heard of many people using services like "Carbon Copy Cloner" or "SuperDuper" to clone their hard drive so they can boot into it or something? Since I use Time Machine, can't I just use that?

    I was thinking that after installing the new HDD I turn on the computer and insert the Mac OS X Snow Leopard install DVD and hold down the option key. Once it gives me the option, I select the DVD and then install the OS on to the new hard drive. Then once I get to the migration helper, I just select my time machine drive and allow it to move my documents over. That would work, right? Any help or advice would be great. I ordered the HDD and it should be here from new egg within this week I'd say.
     
  2. simsaladimbamba

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2010
    Location:
    located
    #2
    That would work. Cloning is just faster, but you need CCC or SuperDuper to do so, as Time Machine is not a bootable backup.
     
  3. smallnshort247 thread starter macrumors 6502a

    smallnshort247

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2010
    #3
    Sweet. Even though the cloner way is faster, I may just play it safe and go with doing the standard install that I listed. And you're right, it does take awhile. Thanks for the quick response!
     
  4. MacDawg macrumors P6

    MacDawg

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2004
    Location:
    "Between the Hedges"
    #4
    Yes, your way works just fine!

    I keep both a TM backup and a current clone, just because it is bootable

    Congrats on the new drive!
     
  5. smallnshort247 thread starter macrumors 6502a

    smallnshort247

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2010
    #5
    MacDawg, I have another question. So how exactly does it boot from the clone? If I help down the option key with my external hard drive plugged in would it see it? I'm kinda lost on the concept of booting into it from a clone. Thanks
     
  6. simsaladimbamba

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2010
    Location:
    located
    #6
    As a clone is a 1:1 copy of your HDD, thus the system and every damn file, and Mac OS X is able to boot from USB and Firewire devices, holding down the OPTION/ALT key during startup gives the selection screen of all connected and bootable devices, thus a clone on a USB HDD, connected to your Mac, will show up on that list or in System Preferences >>> Startup Disk.

    I also have a clone of my entire SSD on an external 2.5" FW/USB HDD and a Time Machine backup of my Home folder on another partition.
     
  7. Nukemkb macrumors 6502a

    Nukemkb

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2006
    Location:
    Columbia, SC
    #7
    I installed a 320 today to replace the 120 that was getting a little cramped for room (only 13 gb left)...and I cloned the new HD. Seemed the easy way to go, and it's working perfectly! :)
    Now I have 211 gb to fill...
     
  8. techguy40 macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2008
    #8

    How often you do backup and make a bootable clone?

    WHy would you need timemachine, if you do a daily clone backup?
     
  9. rkaufmann87 macrumors 68000

    rkaufmann87

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2009
    Location:
    Folsom, CA
    #9
    It's wise to have redundant backups, many of us do this. The reason being is what would happen if one back up was corrupt or lost? I had just that happen, I installed a new HD thinking I'd restore from my Time Machine backup, however it was corrupt. Fortunately I had the ability to create a bootable clone (used the old HD and an enclosure) and was up and running shortly.

    I do mine nightly in the wee hours, I use SuperDuper which has the ability the ability to add changed or new files, this means the backup just takes a few minutes.

    Some people do their's daily, some weekly, some monthly it just all depends how much your information changes.
     

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