Help Ripping DVD

Discussion in 'Digital Video' started by lmannyr, Oct 7, 2011.

  1. lmannyr macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2011
    #1
    I have a ton of DVDs that take up a TON of space on the shelfs. I also picked up a Panasonic GT30 that is attatched to the network. The plan is to copy the movies (main feature only) to a network hard drive. It would be REALLY nice to just scroll through a list of movies on the TV as opposed to looking through the actual DVD shelfs. Anyhow...

    Using "MAC DVDRipper" I ripped MAD MONEY (main feature only). It was copied to a file named "Mad Money.dvdmedia"

    Using isedora (DLNA server) or Twonky (UPnP server), on the TV, I see the folder "Mad Money.dvdmedia" and it's contents - "AUDIO_TS" and "VIDEO_TS" Folders. Inside VIDEO_TS are 4 .VOB files. The TV will play the .VOB files but each file is 30 mins long. It won't play continuously. After i see the first .VOB, I have to select the second .VOB, etc

    Ripping without the ".dvdmedia" extension yeilds the same results. Deleting the ".dvdmedia" extension yields the same results.

    How can I RIP a DVD to play on my TV via DLNA WITHOUT compressing ( I don't care about size)?

    Thanks
     
  2. will waters macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2011
    Location:
    Great Britain
    #2
    Handbrake

    Use handbrake, I have gone through all my DVD collection, and cop pied it to my iMac and I use apple tv 2
     
  3. lmannyr thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2011
    #3
    Use it how?

    I don't want ANY compression. I want the same Quality as the DVD itself on the hard drive. How can handbrake do that for me? Which file format, settings, etc...?

    thanks
     
  4. Brucewl macrumors 6502

    Brucewl

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2010
    #4
    I should to say no matter which format you want to output from DVD with any program, it will always compress your DVD quality. Unless you just copy your DVD disc without any quality lossless as a folder or iso files. Maybe this tool can help you. About handbrake, here is a tutorial I found it from Google.

    About the setting, most of DVD resolution is only 720*480, and when you choose the setting, you should choose the output resolution as 720*480, too high will result to mosaic. And the format is MP4 with H.264 codec. FPS as 30, audio as 441K. With those settings, you will find the video from handbrake is as good as original DVD. If not, just change to another tool.
     
  5. KeithPratt macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2007
    #5
    You could buy the Quicktime MPEG-2 Playback Component, use your DVD ripping software to remove copy protection, then open the resulting VIDEO_TS folder in MPEG Streamclip and save the main feature as an MPEG file.

    No recompression, just compiling into a different container. Don't know how your TV will think of MPEG files...
     
  6. heyadol macrumors member

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2004
    Location:
    coastal
    #6
    Have you tried MakeMKV? I'm pretty sure it just re-packs the video/audio/subtitles into an MKV container without any compression. Then you can just stream the MKV file through your DLNA server. Plus, if you decide later that size is an issue, you still have an uncompressed source which can be fed into Handbrake and compressed using already posted suggestions.
     
  7. smokescreen76 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2010
    #7
    I can understand the theory behind why you might want to avoid re-compressing the DVD files... but DVD Mpeg2 streams are a very old technology.

    You can re-compress them using a modern high-bitrate h.264 codec (Handbrake does this very well in a single interface) and you will never see the difference. The resulting files will be a fraction of the size and lower bandwidth so you won't have problems streaming them over a home network.
     
  8. JasonA macrumors member

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    Feb 18, 2009
    #8
    This.
     
  9. trip1ex macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2008
    #9
    Some programs will play the video ts folders. DVD player in the Mac plays them. Front row did too.

    Otherwise I would just compress them using Handbrake. I think the quality difference is very minimal and you save lots of space plus they will work with ios products.
     
  10. careypo macrumors member

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2011
    #10
    Handbrake is really horrible when it comes to compression. It creates tons of block squares in the video. It's going to be difficult to get the video to play back on your television. What codecs does your television support? It comes down to bitrate. Most H.264 compressors is extremely bad when compared to the original DVD. Good H.264 compression requires a lot of time to compress. There are some external hardware devices that do a good job compressing H.264, but it cost money. I'm not sure what the best solution for you is, but really depends on the formats that your TV can support.

    If you want to really get excellent quality, I always recommend using DVDxDV to convert the DVD to a high quality low compression Quicktime Codec that is compatible with your TV. MPEGStreamClip will work too, but it doesn't work on all DVDs and doesn't support subtitles.
     
  11. simsaladimbamba

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2010
    Location:
    located
    #11

    Wow, since I started using HandBrake six years ago, the only blockiness I encountered, was when I chose the wrong settings, but with today's HandBrake and its presets, those blocks are gone, unless one modifies the presets the WRONG way.

    Maybe you are just promoting DVDxDV as with your other post?
    That software might be good, but there is no need to spend 80 USD for something HandBrake can do too, albeit DVDxDV offers more output choices, but that can be done with MPEG Streamclip + the QuickTime MPEG-2 Playback component for 60 USD less.
     
  12. careypo macrumors member

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2011
    #12
    If you like Handbrake and you aren't bothered by the visual artifacts it produces, keep using it. It doesn't meet my needs for my clients and I would not recommend the output for anything professional. MPEGStreamClip at least allows you to get to Higher Quality Codec settings, but like I said, doesn't support subtitles and doesn't support all DVDs.
     
  13. simsaladimbamba

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2010
    Location:
    located
    #13
    For professional needs I don't touch HB, that is what I use MPEG Streamclip for, but as the OP is wanting to rip for entertainment purposes, HB will be more than fine. I don't know, where you get that blocking thing though, as I test drove HB last week for testing purposes, and with the presets I chose (Apple TV and iPad), I couldn't see any blockiness.
     
  14. KeithPratt macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2007
    #14
    Sounds like you're not using it well. Handbrake uses the x264 codec, which is as good as you'll get in any software or hardware. Set the data rate to 1.5Mb/s and you'll get a near-pristine copy of all but the grainiest DVDs.
     
  15. Brucewl macrumors 6502

    Brucewl

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2010
    #15
    I should to say handbrake is a easy handle tool, but how great it for you which depends on yourself.;)
     
  16. simsaladimbamba

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2010
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    located
    #16
    Okay, this is highly unintelligible.
     
  17. Brucewl macrumors 6502

    Brucewl

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2010
    #17
    I mean if you really do not care about the quality too much, you can just add the video in it, select the output profile, and click to rip it. So easy! But you can also go to customize the "Video Filters" "video" "Audio" “subtitles” etc. according to the different devices. And what's more, you should be clear the resolution about your devices to set the resolution on "Picture". Need much better? Go to "Advance".
     
  18. Malus Deus macrumors member

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    Oct 6, 2011
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    #18
    What software was used for movies you can download in iTunes? They seem to be professional quality.
     
  19. simsaladimbamba

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2010
    Location:
    located
    #19
    They get digital copies directly from the distributor, they don't rip DVDs, especially since they also sell HD content.
    Most likely the iTunes Video Content Team (iTVCT) gets a high resolution digital copy with low compression, from where transcoding processes to SD and HD formats will be done.
    Or the iTVCT gets the correct files from the distributor and doesn't even need to transcode the files. Maybe the have a set set of specs and hand them out to the distributors and the distributors are responsible for the transcoding and give the results to the iTVCT.

    I simply don't know, but what I know, is that video DVDs are not touched during this process, as video DVDs are already heavily compressed, with an old codec.
     
  20. Malus Deus macrumors member

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    Oct 6, 2011
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    Pennsylvania
  21. macjonny1 macrumors 6502a

    macjonny1

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2006
    #21
    MakeMKV has worked flawlessly for me, and never has any issue with copy protection whereas I did with Mactheripper 4.0 and Handbrake at times.

    MakeMKV has worked flawlessly with every blu-ray I have ripped as well. Blurays on a mac=awesome
     
  22. BrunoWill macrumors member

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2011
    #22
    I used MakeMKV before on Windows, it convert so fast, but as I know MKV can not playback with Quicktime unless you have installed VLC or other third-party media player.
     

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