HG10 Shutter Priority Mode...

Discussion in 'Digital Video' started by acearchie, May 25, 2009.

  1. acearchie macrumors 68040

    acearchie

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2006
    #1
    So what exactly does this do.

    I believe the camera can only film either 24p or 50i so what is the shutter priority mode?

    I am able to supposedly turn it up to 1/2000 of a frame but does this mean that it is recording at 2000fps?

    Do I need special software aside from Final Cut Express to view this? I am little confused so any help will do!

    Thanks
     
  2. arjen92 macrumors 65816

    arjen92

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2008
    Location:
    Below sea level
    #2
    Your video camera is actually an "advanced" camera. So you better ask at the camera thread :p. The shutter (which in most camcorders is just digital) opens a certain amount of time and then closes. For example a 1/2000 of a second. This does not mean, your camera will record that amount of frames.

    Why do you have shutter speed? In photography, if you open to long (say 5 seconds) and you move your camera, everything is blurry. But you'll get enough light, for example in the night, a photo of the desert.
    But if you want to photograph me running, I'll be blurry. So you need to make the shutter time smaller, so that when I pass running with my 1000 m/h it will open so shortly it will only collect light from me from one place.

    So the shorter shutter makes clearer pictures when there's motion, and the longer shutter makes shure that enough light enters.

    check this to see the difference: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5kJKqin73Wo&NR=1 or this to get more explanation http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tA2yQ22YGD8

    Edit: I forgot to tell: you can use your aperture to make less light go in, so when with much light and low shutter speeds the picture won't be too bright. And when it's more dark and you have a fast shutter speed, open you aperture to get enough light. You can also use gain, but someone told me not to use more than something like 8dB as the video will get noise.
     
  3. acearchie thread starter macrumors 68040

    acearchie

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2006
    #3
    I understand the basis of the shutter speeds but I do not understand how it is recording if it is 1/2000 at 50i?

    I think this should be the relevant sub forum due to the fact that this is a video camera and not a stills camera.

    Thanks though
     
  4. arjen92 macrumors 65816

    arjen92

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2008
    Location:
    Below sea level
    #4
    when your filming light isn't falling into the chip all the time. in one frames it opens 1/80 of a second. The rest of the time (during that frame) it remains closed. Then comes another frame, the shutter opens for 1/80 of a second. The rest of that frame it's closed. So actually your not filming the entire time. when you have a shutter time that's 1/80 of a second, the camera will actually record only 24/80 of a second, the rest of the time, it doesn't record. of course that amount of recording is spreaded over 1 second.

    So you record (in your case) 24 times a second (24p), but with a shutter time of 1/80 a second, it's only open each frame 1/80 of a second.

    like this:

    frame1

    open shutter
    recording
    close shutter
    waiting for next frame

    frame2
    open shutter
    recording
    close shutter
    waiting for next frame

    frame 3
    open shutter recording
    close shutter
    waiting for next frame

    hope it helps
     
  5. acearchie thread starter macrumors 68040

    acearchie

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2006
    #5
    Thanks that explanation is great however can you explain how shooting at

    24/2000 is better than 24/250 as I understand why 24/8 is better but not the others.

    Also if my camera has 50i does this mean that it will record 50fps but interlaced?

    So if I wanted to shoot a slo-mo scene which settings would I use?

    Thanks
     
  6. arjen92 macrumors 65816

    arjen92

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2008
    Location:
    Below sea level
    #6
    Because the shutter is faster it will get sharper images when things are moving fast. If you want to film a fountain for example you can see the dropplets (so in the movie all the water is thousands of little dropplets, if you break you can see the edges) but if the shutter time is longer you get a creamie, milk like bundle of water. When you break you see a white vague bar.
    That when you want a faster shutter time. (but I never really used it).

    I'm sorry, but I can't help you with what to do when you want to record slow motion. You should have a fast shutter time, that's for sure. But whether you should use 24p or 50i I don't know. I thought with 50i the 2 frames are merged to one so you get 25p. But I could be totally wrong. And I think it depends on how you import. With how many frames the computer will import the footage. So I don't know about that.
     
  7. acearchie thread starter macrumors 68040

    acearchie

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2006
    #7
    Thanks for the help.

    I may try messing around with settings until someone comes up with the answer.
     

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