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Discussion in 'Buying Tips and Advice' started by DarkRevenant, Jul 13, 2008.

  1. DarkRevenant macrumors member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2008
    #1
    This is not a thread asking when the montevina MBPs will be out and if it's worth the wait or not.

    I'm wondering if the release of a new generation of MBPs has come under similar circumstances to the ones now. A new chipset being released tomorrow, and absolutely nothing but speculation by us forum junkees. Obviously a release is very soon, but has a release been as soon as a month after a chipset release?

    Also, is the new chipset likely to be buggy? I have heard of people talk about "Revision A" products being buggy and to stay away from them. It didn't seem like this was the case with the penryn processors, or does a processor update not count as a new product? Sorry if this is an obvious question.

    Thanks.
     
  2. Tallest Skil macrumors P6

    Tallest Skil

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2006
    Location:
    1 Geostationary Tower Plaza
    #2
    There are only ever two revisions when you're talking about hardware. Intel's "tick-tock" thingy sees to that.

    There's the chipset and the processor.

    Then you get a different chipset and the same processor.

    Then you get a third chipset and the shrunken processor.

    Then you get the fourth chipset and the same shrunken processor.

    Then it starts over. The greatest "Rev A" problems come from cases.
     
  3. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2004
    Location:
    Grand Rapids, MI, USA
    #3
    Right... it happened with Merom, it happened with Santa Rosa, it happened with Penryn, it's happening with Montevina, flip flopping between changes at the chipset level and processor level...

    Usually the warning about rev. A is about major changes to the Mac architecture and not stuff Intel does. The entire computer, like a full Macbook, is a much more complicated beast that involves integrating components from different suppliers, assembly, etc, and that's where issues come up. So if the next MBP has a design overhaul, we'd consider it a revision A product, but we consider the last revision A MBP to be the original Core Duo MBP -- not any of the Intel architecture changes that have happened since then.
     

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