Home Appliance Input

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by A.Goldberg, Jan 1, 2018.

  1. A.Goldberg macrumors 68020

    A.Goldberg

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2015
    Location:
    Boston
    #1
    So in a couple weeks my significant other and I will be closing on our first home, a condo in the Boston area.

    We have plans to do some renovations before we move in, including remodeling the kitchen entirely. We mostly have the kitchen planned out but still need to make some decisions, particularly on appliances. The existing kitchen is from ~2003 and has GE profile appliances. The plan is to put in higher end appliances- I’m not really sure this is necessary but I supppose it will help with resale. Here are my questions:

    1) Reccomended Brands- obviously lots of brand options- Subzero/Wolf, Viking, Decor, etc and GE monogram on the lower price end. Obviously longevity/reliability is important.
    2) Brand matching- apparently this is a thing. I’m just confused what happens if you buy a Subzero Fridge, they don’t make dishwashers. How much of an issue is this for future home buyers.
    3) Stainless vs wood paneled front fridge and dishwasher. Thoughts?
    4) All-in-One stove cooktop vs. separated oven and cooktop - Pros/Cons. Gas vs. Induction (or both, I believe you can do both with Wolf). Electric is out of the question.
    5) We want a built in fridge. Side by side is out of the question given we don’t have a ton of space for a giant side by side. That leaves French Door vs. fridge on the top w/freezer drawer on the bottom.
    6) Counter top material. Granite and Marble are nice, but require a bit of maintaince. Perhaps a quality synthetic alternative.

    7) Reccomended washer and dryer, preferably stackable? I know front loaded washers were once a vibration issue if not located in the basement or concrete slab. I’m not sure I understand the difference between spending $<1000 vs $2000+ on washer and dryers.

    To give an idea the kitchen, cabinets are off-white painted wood. Bottom cabinets have a bead-board like insert, top cabinets insert is flat. Above the top cabinets are smaller cabinets with glass window inserts and above that nice thick molding. Fridge and microwave will be built in.

    Any advice on good brands would be great. I’ve received a lot of conflicting information from involved designers and contractors. Also, thoughts on some of the design details would be great.

    Thanks!

    -AG
     
  2. LizKat macrumors 601

    LizKat

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2004
    Location:
    Catskill Mountains
    #2
    Not to distract from your thread and original post but I'm gonna piggyback on any responses you get about washers and dryers. Mine are 20 years old and it's time to make a pre-emptive strike before they decide to prank me.

    I'd like to know what people here really think of the high efficiency washers, I hear local complaints about them but don't know if they are being used or maintained per instructions. So, I tend to discount the carping about "they don't clean my clothes right" and "they stink inside". Also, why are some of them so darn big? I saw some Samsung washer-dryer "twins" that seem like the size of a VW bug each, compared to my current machines.

    As far as stoves go... Wolf, wow. Color me green w/ envy if you go there. ;)
     
  3. eyoungren, Jan 1, 2018
    Last edited: Jan 1, 2018

    eyoungren macrumors Core

    eyoungren

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2011
    Location:
    ten-zero-eleven-zero-zero by zero-two
    #3
    My only advice on this, if you have the money: Jenn Air

    My grandmother used to swear by their stovetop ranges. They use a special system that allows for ventilation without a hood.

    As far as the countertops, have you considered concrete? It can be styled many different ways to get the look you want and costs considerably less.

    There's a firm in Scottsdale, AZ that specializes in concrete for all manner of things including countertops. I imagine there's got to be something similar in Boston.

    EDIT: Ha! Here you go… http://www.bostonconcretecountertops.com/
     
  4. MacNut macrumors Core

    MacNut

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2002
    Location:
    CT
    #4
    Curious on the repairability of high end appliances. Do parts cost more and are labor charges higher considering most of these end up in restaurant settings.
    --- Post Merged, Jan 1, 2018 ---
    HE washers come in top loader and side loaders. The Side loads seems to have the smell issue as water pools on the bottom. They have cleaning cycles that bleach them out to rid the smell.
     
  5. eyoungren macrumors Core

    eyoungren

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2011
    Location:
    ten-zero-eleven-zero-zero by zero-two
    #5
    We have a Hotpoint HTWP1400F2WW. It's a top loader, high capacity washer. Got it free with our Amex points over two years ago (about $450 at Home Depot where we ordered it).

    Our dryer is a front load GE that we got at a charity store. It was old to begin with but we've had it for at least 10 or 11 years and it's still a good machine.
     
  6. Macky-Mac macrumors 68030

    Macky-Mac

    Joined:
    May 18, 2004
    #6
    20 years ago it was primarily the upscale brands (Subzero/Wolf etc) that were available with stainless steel finishes and in configurations that mimicked "professional" equipment, but since then "EVERYBODY" has introduced stainless steel and the look to their product lines. That continues to be the popular desirable look currently.......just spend a few hours watching HGTV and you'll see house hunters despairing over the lack of "stainless" appliances in kitchens without them.

    If you're actually in a pretty upscale market, then maybe consider the upscale brands, but otherwise the mere presence of stainless will help you out with resale........that's assuming you resell before fashion changes to something else.
     
  7. Martyimac macrumors 68000

    Martyimac

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2009
    Location:
    S. AZ.
    #7
    The front load HE washers tend to agitate the clothes better than the HE top loaders, from what I have heard.
    Our front load HE washer has to be set on "bulky" to get enough water to really clean the clothes well. It's a Sears Kenmore if that matters.
    The washers will not stink if you let them dry completely after use, which means leaving the door AND the soap dispenser open after use. Many of them now days have a soft stop on the door to keep it open when not in use.
    And the reason they look so large is that most people, including us, put them on a platform the bring the doors up to a better height for loading and unloading. But the platforms do incorporate extras storage area so that's a plus.
     
  8. Mousse macrumors 68000

    Mousse

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2008
    Location:
    Flea Bottom, King's Landing
    #8
    My front loader doesn't have any smell issue. Just a guess, but those who complain about the smell might not wipe down the door or seal after each wash (nice environment for mold growth). It's a pain in the derriere. But once it becomes habit, it's no longer an issue. I do run the cleaning cycle every 2 months, without bleach though. My only beef with front loaders is they take forever to complete a wash cycle (2x as long as a typical top loader)
     
  9. elemenohme macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2014
    #9
    I'd recommend heading over the Yale Electric in Dorchester off the expressway. That's where I bought all of my appliances when I lived in Boston. They know what they're doing and they service what they sell.

    https://www.yaleappliance.com
     
  10. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 3, 2009
    Location:
    Boston
    #10
    I recommend using Consumer Reports for this type of info. I think you'll get a lot of good information about each of the brands and their stability
     
  11. Martyimac macrumors 68000

    Martyimac

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2009
    Location:
    S. AZ.
    #11
    Absolutely. Folks shouldn't go to CR and place much credence in their computer info, there are far to many good websites with more in depth reviews, same goes for cars. But for home appliances, I don't know anybody that does the kind of in depth testing on appliances that CR does. And remember, CR accepts no advertising. In case you don't make the connection, no advertising means CR is not beholding to any company, if their product sucks, CR will tell you.
     
  12. Scepticalscribe macrumors Westmere

    Scepticalscribe

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2008
    Location:
    The Far Horizon
    #12
    I'm in Europe, so the American brand names mean little; however, when buying anything of that sort, I will almost always choose one of the good German brands; they are solid, well made, reliable, usually last for years, and have good after sales service.
     
  13. RichardMZhlubb Contributor

    RichardMZhlubb

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2010
    Location:
    Washington, DC
    #13
    We redid our kitchen ten years ago with all Jenn Air appliances and have already had to replace the dishwasher and cooktop. It's one data point, but I've not been happy with their reliability (although the fridge and oven are still fine). My one recommendation is Bosch dishwashers, particularly if your kitchen isn't closed off from living areas. The Bosch we bought to replace the Jenn Air dishwasher is so quiet I have to check the light to see if it's running. We ended up buying a Dacor gas cooktop, and it's been great. (We really wanted a Thermador, but it didn't fit.)

    As for the counters, we went with Silestone and have been very happy with it. Ten years and no noticeable stains or scratches.
     
  14. eyoungren macrumors Core

    eyoungren

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2011
    Location:
    ten-zero-eleven-zero-zero by zero-two
    #14
    To be fair, when my grandmother was raving about Jenn Air it was 1987 and I was 17. She had just bought a new stove and had it installed. In her mind it was the best and it was a brand she had used way before my time.

    I bring that up because a lot can change in 50 or so years. I've never owned any Jenn Air myself so I would not know first hand.
     
  15. RichardMZhlubb Contributor

    RichardMZhlubb

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2010
    Location:
    Washington, DC
    #15
    Not sure it adds anything, but I found this picture in my photos of our Dacor gas cooktop and silestone island countertop (with the Jenn Air fridge and oven in the background).

    [​IMG]
     
  16. oldhifi macrumors 65816

    oldhifi

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2013
    Location:
    USA
    #16
    I bought a Kitchenaid dishwasher real POS..won't clean dished worth a damn..my wife is still mad
     
  17. D.T., Jan 2, 2018
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2018

    D.T. macrumors G3

    D.T.

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2011
    Location:
    Vilano Beach, FL
    #17
    I would _not_ be afraid to mix and match - while there's a little more design consistency if you do, if you step back a little, one SS appliance pretty much looks like the other. I'd rather have the best of brand for each product. If we have a catastrophic failure where I can't fix the appliance [cheaply **], we would shop and buy "out of brand".

    Ours doesn't either and our set is going is ~ 8 years old - it was the top of the line (at the time of purchase, ~$2K, but we had some deep discounts), LG, Cherry Metallic red :D We have a separate, closed off laundry room connected to the garage, so after use, the door to the house can be closed and the door on the washer left open, and it's easily walked around (if you need to pass through that area, it connects to the garage).


    ** so our GE profile fridge broke, just a year out of pretty lengthy extended warranty. As is common with electronics, it was a capacitor on the main logic board, to get it solved quickly I ordered a replacement board from one of my known good appliance part suppliers, only $20 to get it here the next day, 10 minutes to replace, fixed for ~$110. Afterwards, I ordered a set of replacement caps for the old board, ~$20, fixed the old board (confirmed by a quick test of plugging it in - kept it as a backup). Been running for 5+ years after that fix.

    The matching GE profile microwave went janky too, like would power, run, light up, but not switch on the actual heating system. Some people might say any effort is silly on a microwave, but this was a over the range, SS, dual mode convection/microwave, so not cheap (originally close a grand). So with about 30 minutes of research, I found several sources saying it was the latches/switches - pulled it down (which is a huge PITA), opened it up, bypassed the top switch and sure enough, fired up as expected. So I ordered both (figured if one went out, the other wasn't far behind), a new top light (that had gone out a few months before, but requires the whole thing to be pulled down) and replacement charcoal filter. About $50 worth of parts, it's as good as new, been running for a year.
     
  18. heehee macrumors 68020

    heehee

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2006
    Location:
    Same country as Santa Claus
    #18
    If you are renovating and want high-end, get a built in oven and microwave, it looks much nicer. Our appliances are Kitchenaid, looks nice and it still look new after 3 years. Picture not mine.
     

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  19. Zenithal macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2009
    #19
    Posting in here so I can get back to this later when I've got more free time.
     
  20. Zenithal, Jan 2, 2018
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2018

    Zenithal macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2009
    #20
    Wolf. Wolf is a quality brand. Easy to maintain and to fix. Viking used to have an edge a long time ago, but they've been wrought with issues. The most common issue will be replacing your igniters or even the entire ignition system on a gas range. Save yourself a headache. They're cheaper for a reason.

    Wolf comes in sealed and unsealed burners. Each has their pros and cons. It really depends on how you want it and whether or not those pros and cons are ideal for you. The biggest benefit of a sealed burner is the ease of cleanup you'll have if something spills over. Open burners can be a bitch to clean but offer higher power output. Both burner designs come with special shapes on prosumer models or traditional round burners.




    Doesn't really matter. Some brands excel at certain things and fail horribly at others. It's really up to you, and these are products that are ever changing and improving. Our last remodel was in 2009, so take my advice on this particular point with a grain of salt. It's changed, but regardless of that, you should see fantastic durability and ease of maintenance with Wolf products. Dishwasher wise, I'd go with Asko. They're a brand distributed under Wolf/Sub Zero and they're phenomenal. Practically bulletproof.

    Stainless. Wood can be nice, but think about resale down the road. If the next owner wants different cabinets, it'll just cost them extra money. In any case, these days large appliances like that are swapped out when it comes to a new house or the current owner buys new stuff with the intention of selling it off. It's much like a bath tub or shower; no one wants to touch stuff you used extensively.

    Depends on your tastes and whether well accessible. Traditional stove won't make sense if the walking path is tight or the ergonomics are bad. With separated ovens, you do face other obstacles like maintenance access and the loss of cabinet space. Or if you have a ton of kitchen space, you can do both or each one.

    Example: Full stove + wall ovens or full stove + wall ovens + separate cooktop.

    As for fuel source. GAS. GAS GAS GAS. Nothing will compare to the power output these professional-esque stoves can put out in gas format. Restaurant grade stoves tend to warp the very best pots and pans over time from their power output. Prosumer appliances like Viking, Wolf, et al. will be a small notch below these.

    These gas stoves now come with an auto shutoff if a leak is detected or the ignition system fails.

    Without knowing the dimensions available, it's hard to say. Ideally, for safety reasons and looks, a bottom loaded freezer is probably the best option. Aside from that, they come in traditional large door or French door. Get one without an ice maker or water dispenser. Less headache, and more room. If you must have a RO water unit, get it installed somewhere else in the kitchen with easy maintenance access. Or if you've got a walk in pantry with a water line, set it up there. Better yet, buy a bottom loading water dispenser and hide it away. This is the least maintenance requiring machinery. We have a second refrigerator in our butler's pantry, and a large chest freezer in the garage.

    Also have an ice maker that runs on a separate RO system.


    Quartz. It comes in a variety of colors and styles. The very good quartz, like that Israeli company I told you about, makes some of the best (and expensive) quartz I've seen that rivals marble and granite in aesthetics. Few people will know the difference. Marble is beautiful, but it stains quickly and incredibly easily. Quartz also comes in various finishes, so the world is your oyster, so to speak.

    Silestone is a company that specializes in quarts only products. People often think it's a type of countertop when it isn't. They make some very nice stuff at various price levels. I know for fact that they've offered custom counter top projects well into the low $100K range. Anything is possible if you're willing to pay for it.

    I'm going to say Samsung. Miele is a good brand, like Sceptical says, but their service centers are sparse here. There's a few authorized service centers in Boston, for example, but maybe just one will deal in service for kitchen appliances, and the rest will be for their vacuums or washers. The Samsung units we have were installed roughly 9 years ago or more. I forget. We use both washer and dryer 2-3 a week, usually large loads. I've yet to notice an issue with their exterior or interior. I recently inspected the silver plate system inside the washer and it was as pristine as it was the day we got them. This has changed, so you may want to check CR, but I caution you on this. CR's testing can be incredibly stupid at times, such as last year's articles on dish washers. There's a very good brand but it looks very dated. It's called Speed Queen. Really dated look, but very modern inside.


    Also, I'm not a fan of cleaning modes on ovens. You will rarely need to use if it you do some maintenance cleanup after cooking anything in there, aside from cookies or cakes. All it does is expose the internal portion of the oven and anything else to extremely high heat and burns anything in it. An enzyme based cleaner and a sponge will clean just about anything, including baked on crud. Dawn Professional in a small bucket with hot water and a sponge works. Run a wet, soapy sponge across the crud, set it and forget it for an hour. Come back and wipe it off with a towel. Or use a nylon brush to gently scrub the crud off. The enzymes in the Dawn solution eat fats and proteins.


    Stainless steel will tarnish and or show splotches. I've tried just about every single cleaner out there and nothing comes close to using Pledge. The furniture stuff. Yep, you read that correctly. Wood furniture spray is the best cleaner, and forms a non-oily barrier preventing fingerprints for up to six weeks. Warm soapy water (Dawn again) works just as well, but the Pledge is easier. It will restore stainless steel to what it looked like the day you bought it. Including removing that cloudy oxidation, making it brighter as it cleans and cleanses the metal, and it protects it with a very thin oily film to protect the metal. You won't be able to feel it.


    The only reason we didn't do Miele was that at the time, and even now, the nearest non-vacuum repair center authorized by Miele is over 100 miles away. Whereas I can have a Viking or Wolf specialist/technician with parts by tomorrow afternoon. General brands like GE or even Kitchenaid don't offer this type of white glove service.


    Before you do purchase anything, read up on it and go talk to some restaurant owners. They can give you the lowdown on their professional grade Wolf or Vikings. The stuff you buy at the consumer level is a trickle down from the professional stuff. If you've got a rewards credit card or a store card that offers a percentage in cash back with no limit, charge it on that. At the time of our purchases, we had such a route and did everything on the card, and paid the balance off in three or four payments since there was a 12 month interest free period. I'll have to look at the paperwork, but I believe the total was under $28K for everything so it was decently priced, considering prices are higher now. Plus, that great cashback.

    The great thing about the professional style stuff is that they sit on feet, usually, and it's easy to clean spills or dirt or dust underneath the unit. As someone who likes things to be clean and sanitary, it was a huge selling point for me.

    Also, if it's feasible, get a central vacuum system installed for the kitchen and high footpath areas. It's going to make general vacuuming or sweeping a cinch. You guys are already planning on doing extensive remodeling, now's the right time to consider this and not way late into the remodeling phase. This stuff is pricey for a reason. It lasts.


    Here's a huge protip: I know a certain someone you're close to wants to be hands on with everything... but hire a professional designer. Often times, they can get you the same product for much less or they can import something at a fraction of what you would pay.

    Home paint wise, stick with the higher lines of Ben Moore or Sherwin Williams, and have your contractor buy the paint through their supplier. The home improvement store or the paint store ones you can buy tend to be of lower quality. It also costs less if they buy it. The same high end Ben Moore that costs $60 a gallon will cost them a fraction because they buy so much of it.


    Also, if you think you'd want to replace the windows in the near future (under 15 years), have them replaced now. It's a headache later on.
     
  21. Scepticalscribe macrumors Westmere

    Scepticalscribe

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2008
    Location:
    The Far Horizon
    #21
    Personally, while I mentioned German brands (Bosch is excellent, and I have had some of their products) nothing touches Miele; they are brilliant, and I strongly recommend anything of theirs.
     
  22. Zenithal macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2009
    #22
    In my experience prior to our current remodel, the Bosch stuff we had wasn't that great. My folks have had the same Bosch dishwasher and washer/dryer setup since the mid or late 90s. Their Bosch equipment was better than ours. I feel Bosch quality went down at some point. And, as I said, Miele is great, provided service centers can accommodate your appliances. All the authorized centers around us then and now service mostly vacuums and dishwashers. We do have a Miele vacuum, though, and it is brilliant. I spent four hours vacuuming on Saturday evening and it didn't turn off once from overheating, when other vacuums would.

    The only good thing about the Bosch we had at the end was I was able to find them a good home. I had a general brand twice before the Samsungs, in other places. They were breaking down every other month. The Samsungs were a large gamble, but cheap enough that I wouldn't mind if they broke down completely. Pissed off, but not raging with anger. In the nearly 10 years we've used ours, there hasn't been a peep from them. No creaking, no noise, nothing. Not even any rust or discoloration. I just wish they weren't so bloody hideous to look at.
     
  23. A.Goldberg, Jan 3, 2018
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2018

    A.Goldberg thread starter macrumors 68020

    A.Goldberg

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2015
    Location:
    Boston
    #23
    Thanks to everyone for your input!

    @Zenithal we are using a professional kitchen designer, they have their advice on appliances, but so does the architect and contractor. I’m sure there isn’t really something too “wrong” I can do when shopping the top brands. Ironically I was just at my cousins “new” house in Connecticut (very nice 4000sq ft home, a bit cookie cutter... but the $12,000 Subzero fridge’s door opened the wrong way and no, you cannot simply swap the hindges and handle)!

    My parents house has a Subzero fridge, Wolf stove and ovens and Bosche dishwasher. Their house in RI has Viking appliances, which seem to be slightly cheaper. They seem to be content with all of them. The Subzero refrigerators are nice but you tend to pay a big premium and at least the ones my parents have owned seem to require more maintainence (vacuuming out the coils regularly). My parents have always had a Subzero and my mom seems to be pushing krnmlrrmmmmmmnt

    Central vac is probably doable based on on what we’re renovating, but I’m not sure it’s worth it considering the size of the property and the limited space to put the collection unit. I’ve never found central vac to be that beneficial aside from the little doohickies that allow you to sweep debris directly into the system. We are renovating the main hallway inside the apartment (new walls with wainscoting, Ethernet in the adjoining rooms, recessed lighting) so central vac is possible. In addition to the kitchen we are also renovating the full bath and the living room (recessed lighting, built ins, redoing the fire place, possibly built in speakers- or at the least prewiring. etc). The kitchen and baths were last overhauled around 2003.

    Taking tips from my father, we will be using Benjamin Moore paints.

    Floors are another factor. Everything is hardwood except the kitchen which is tile. We’re probabltngoing to retile out of functionality and considering a wall is coming down. The hardwood is original so it would be nice to keep, but redoing all the hardwood is a possibility to have it all match... but obviously a significant extra cost.

    @Scepticalscribe, it’s funny you not knowing the American brands. I know someone who recently bought a house (in the US), formerly owned by Europeans. Apparently a lot of the appliances, especially plumbing fixtures were European Brands none of the workers knew anything about. Funny how that works. Interestingly, I recently read Bosche dishwashers are made in North Carolina (or I supppse at least some of them)... not what I would have expected.


    We met again with the designer today...

    Anyways, I think the current plan is to do the separate oven and cooktop, but place the on top of each other for a more streamlined look. We’re not doing double ovens due to space considerations (not to mention we won’t use the second and it’s just another cost). I think we’re going to avoid putting the cooktop/oven in the island as everyone tends to congregate around islands naturally (I suppose that’s why the new giant homes tend to have two islands now). My parents home has a two tier island with built in cooktop, and it drives my mother nuts how everyone is always around the island and in the way (and they have a rather large home and kitchen).

    Anyone know anything microwaves built into the cabinets (not installed over the cooktop), but in the cabinets. My parents have this and knock on wood they haven’t needed a replacement. My fear is microwave lifespans seem to be the most limited of all appliances and also the most variable in size. I’m afraid if it does years down the road it will be impossible to find a correct sized replacement. I need to find out if they do standardized sizing.

    We still are torn between stainless and wood paneled appliances. I’ve always liked wood paneled (with the exception of side-by-side fridges which I don’t think look good in wood- not to mention suck functionally unless you have the space to put in a very large one). I’m not really concerned if future owners want to change out the cabinets- that’s a big project in itself and typically you can swap in a new wood or stainless panel. Stainless is pretty timeless but at the same time more susceptible to fingerprints and other imperfections. Stainless seems to be more en Vogue right now so I’m not sure if wood will look dated.

    Countertops are quite interesting there too. I have been looking at the concrete surfaces/ very cool. My parents home growing up had marble countertops with the upper teir of the island being mohognny- both far too much work to maintain. Our RI summer house has silestone, which is great as it has minimal care. Even being a higher end grade, there is something just a little too artificial about it.

    Thanks for the advice on the laundry machines too. We would prefer something stackable to gain some extra space. My parents despite buying high end kitchen appliances have developed this theory to buy cheaper washers and dryers (currently Whirlpool)!as they’ve strangely had more major reliability issues with the more expensive models they’ve purchased.

    Anyways, there are just so many choices. I can’t imagine building a brand new home. To some degree my mother has taken lead and as she moved this kind of thing (And is planning to redo her kitchen next year). At the same time, it’s a bit frustrating.

    I’m just not sure if it’s worth spending top dollar for high end appliances (i.e. $12k for a Subzero fridge)... saving a few grand going with Viking with essentially equal prestige but not quite the same level of technical sophistication (i.e. separate cooling systems for fridge and freezer which has some benefits), of saving a few thousand more going with something like GE’s professional Monogram line that also offers professional features and looks.

    Coming from a family involved with real estate development, I know the most important thing from a resale value is maintaining neutral styling that most everyone will appreciate. I think our design fits that goal.
     
  24. jbarley macrumors 68040

    jbarley

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2006
    Location:
    Vancouver Island
    #24
    My dishwasher has worked flawlessly for almost 62 years, sure glad I married her when I did.:D
     
  25. Zenithal macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2009
    #25
    Any pro-grade-ish brand is good. Generally, Viking will have more faults and thus more repairs. Buying any of these upper brands is akin to buying a luxury vehicle. Wolf will have issues, but they'll be far and few in between. The major issue I've seen with people having problems are boilovers damaging their igniters. Realistically, it's very easy to clean them and get them to function. People don't want to learn and would rather pay a premium to have them swapped out. It's also easy to regulate how much gas is gonig to the burner. Burners are pretty much the same across the range of stoves, but they can have their own access points. For the most part, a very thing flathead or phillips will do just fine. You just need to figure out where to stick it.

    For coil maintenance, I use one of my higher end Metrovac blowers. It globs up the dust and it comes flying out. It's messy, but it's way easier than moving the thing forward. If it'll be enclosed on both sides, you'll need a professional to bring it out of its cubby. Yes, that is the system I'd want and would recommend. If you run CAT cable through the walls, I'd aim for 2-3 wires, thus 2-3 ports.
    Smart man. Their higher end paint is practically bullet proof. You could throw a soggy coffee filter at a white wall, leave it to dry for a month, come back and wipe it down with a wet cloth and it'll look brand new. Good paint.

    You can go for large tile. There is another option. If your contractor can find a near matching wood plank tile (I don't know what their real name is), you can do that. This is becoming more and more popular, even in luxury builds because of its matte surface compared to other tile that is actually porous. It's difficult to scratch it, damage it or whatever. Works great in a bathroom.

    If I had to go back 9 years ago, I'd have done all our bathrooms aside from the master in that material instead of the marble tile. It looks better and comes in just about any shade or color or pattern. It'll last longer than the marble will, too. The only drawback is that the prices you'll see online are not indicative of what you'll spend. Regardless, it's something to consider. You could do traditional tile in the kitchen and opt for the wood tile in the bathrooms or the guest bathroom. Dark style with a dark grout, dark cabinetry with some highlight looks reserved and clean. A bit modern, too.

    I would limit carpet to the bedrooms. If you have a walk-in closet, I'd avoid the carpet in the closet, or rather use a very short fiber for it.
     

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90 January 1, 2018