HomeKit for Mac?

Discussion in 'HomeKit, HomePod, CarPlay, Home & Auto Technology' started by Zcott, Sep 3, 2016.

  1. Zcott macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2009
    Location:
    Belfast, Ireland
    #1
    Are there any HomeKit apps for Mac for when I don't have an iOS device to hand?
     
  2. Sakurambo-kun macrumors 6502

    Sakurambo-kun

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2015
    Location:
    UK
    #2
    Homekit doesn't exist on the Mac as far as I know, and it's missing in action in Sierra too.

    There's a decent Hue app on the Mac App store called Chroma which is worth a look. Other than that though, I haven't found much.
     
  3. FreeState macrumors 68000

    FreeState

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2004
    Location:
    San Diego, CA
    #3
    I think it will be added to Siri on the Mac eventually, currently you get a "I can't help you with HomeKit here" when trying to use it.
     
  4. Chupa Chupa macrumors G5

    Chupa Chupa

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2002
    #4
    Sorry to resurrect this old thread but seemed better than starting a new one. Anyway I been renovating my bedroom since around the time Sierra was released and just finished and hooked up my Hue again. Noticed no Homekit support and was a bit stunned Siri didn't work here. Anyone know why? Seems a bit odd and unfinished seeing it's been on iOS for a few releases now. Certainly it can't be a hardware issue.
     
  5. Julien macrumors G4

    Julien

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2007
    Location:
    Atlanta
    #5
    [sarcasm]Because you were talking to Siri Jr and Siri Jr doesn't know who Siri Sr is or how to content it.[/sarcasm]

    Pet Peeve: Sri really needs to be a singularity and not a collection of semi-affiliated services.
     
  6. NOITAIDAR macrumors member

    NOITAIDAR

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2015
    #6
    So from a Technical standpoint, the problem with introducing HomeKit control on a Mac, is that pesky thing called security.

    If your Mac had HomeKit control, then your home could be hacked. A Personal Computer is more likely to be remotely controlled by malware/trojans, than a (non-jailbroken) iOS device. This would negate Apple's whole stance on implementing the HomeKit encryption hardware on all HomeKit compatible devices.

    Yes, it's a pain that Sierra can't control HomeKit, but it's much more secure that way.

    I would imagine that at some point they will have to do something about it, but that will likely require new hardware that contains hard-wired Homekit encryption chips. Most probably in new computer releases, but maybe in a new magic keyboard, with a Siri button (like the Apple TV Siri Remote)?
     
  7. FreeState macrumors 68000

    FreeState

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2004
    Location:
    San Diego, CA
    #7

    Why couldn't it use the AppleTV or iPad to do it then? Just like your phone or AppeTV remote currently works...
    --- Post Merged, Nov 7, 2016 ---

    Which Hue system do you have?

    Edit to add: if your system is older it isn't HomeKit compatible, you will need to purchase a new hub: http://www2.meethue.com/en-us/productdetail/philips-hue-bridge
     
  8. NOITAIDAR macrumors member

    NOITAIDAR

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2015
    #8
    Because the minute your mac can control something, doesn't matter if it's doing it via another device, your mac is essentially controlling it.

    A Mac is infinitely more susceptible to hacking than an iPad or an Apple TV, because it's an open operating system. You can write and run programs on it that do not have to be vetted by the Apple App Store teams.
     
  9. Chupa Chupa macrumors G5

    Chupa Chupa

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2002
    #9
    Yes, I understand that, but I have a Gen 2 w/ Homekit. Works great with iPad/iPhone, just curious why it wasn't integrated into Siri for Mac.

    I'm not buying into the whole "your Mac could get hacked" excuse. If my Mac can get hacked then there are better things for the hackers to get at than my lights. Also hackers already have found a way to hack "Internet of Things" devices directly. I was reading this article just this week about hackers distributing viruses wirelessly though smart devices like light bulbs.
     
  10. NOITAIDAR macrumors member

    NOITAIDAR

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2015
    #10
    That's why HomeKit devices are more secure, because of their encryption chip. The devices that were hacked to take down Dyn a few weeks ago were all non-HomeKit, mostly Chinese origin DVRs, with hard-codes passwords!
     
  11. Rudi9719 macrumors newbie

    Rudi9719

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2017
    Location:
    Utica, NY
    #11
    Not to burst your bubble, but macOS is extremely hardened to hackers for multiple reasons. I actually am a network technician, and am constantly trying to bust in to the machines I manage.

    However, I would like to point out that by saying HomeKit devices are more secure because of their encryption chip- your argument is invalid as MacBooks now ship with the same Secure Enclave (which is the proper term for this encryption chip) as the other devices. (Which the AppleTV actually doesn't have.) Now, another point. You mentioned that macOS is more apt to get hacked because it's an open operating system. Yes, it does have open sourced components, yes that means there could be more vulnerabilities. But if you know anything about development on macOS you know that in order to write a program that interfaces with apple's kits- it has to enable the entitlements. Which means it has to be signed by a registered developer. Which means if someone writes malware against HomeKit- not only will Apple block the entitlement, taking away that app's access to the HomeKit APIs, it will also block the developer. Meaning that developer (or team) can no longer release or sign applications.


    Sorry for the necro, I just can't stand ignorance and am trying to get HomeKit working on my Mac, and came across this.
     
  12. cynics macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2012
    #12
    The secure enclave and apple authentication coprocessor ("chip" found in HomeKit devices) are different things. The authentication coprocessor was used in 3rd party devices as an ID for MFi for the most part. Devices with iCloud access already have all the security they need built in (AppleTV).

    This chip is no longer required (iOS 11) and authentication can be obtain via software although device manufacturers still need to meet the rest of the requirements of HomeKit.

    Many smart devices are connected to multiple servers and need to communicate outside the home network to talk to things inside the home network. And a lot of these devices use no encryption in network and very little out of network. And all that is a best case scenario. If the server the device is connected to is the attacker, forget about it.

    Meanwhile HomeKit devices are using a dedicated Apple protocol HAP (HomeKit Accessory Protocol), direct communication is done via 3072 bit e2e encryption, prime256v1 elliptic curve keys, etc etc. For devices that need to approved by Apple to be commercially sold.
     
  13. joker00 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2011
    #13
    Strangely I think the reason for no home on Mac is Siri. just turn in Siri and tell her to turn on the lights
     
  14. smithrh macrumors 68020

    smithrh

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2009
  15. cynics macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2012
    #15
    If only it was that easy. Lol

    Screen Shot 2018-01-07 at 12.42.47 PM.png
     
  16. xraydoc macrumors demi-god

    xraydoc

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2005
    Location:
    192.168.1.1
    #16
    HomeKit support is definitely needed on the Mac.
     
  17. indiekiduk macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2005
    Location:
    Glasgow, Scotland
    #17
    can get by with the Colors for Hue status bar app to control the lights but would like to view a HomeKit camera on the Mac (Logi Circle 2) which can't be viewed via RTSP and the web interface involves a round-trip to their servers with a 30 second delay.
     
  18. Julien macrumors G4

    Julien

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2007
    Location:
    Atlanta
    #18
    One of my favorite pet peeves: Siri needs to be a singularity across all devices and not a collection of different apps.
     
  19. Solomani, Mar 6, 2018
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2018

    Solomani macrumors 68040

    Solomani

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2012
    Location:
    Alberto, Canado
    #19
    So what comes after High Sierra? And does Apple even know we want HomeKit ability on the Mac? I mean…. uhhh….. Macs tend to occupy a very central place in the house (iMac or PowerBooks) and get used all the time every day. From that "central command" area where the (desktop or laptop) Mac sits would be the ideal place to control HomeKit appliances….. lighting, fans, spy cameras, HomePod, and other home automation things.

    It's 2018 and I'm finally warming to the idea of purchasing a couple of HomeKit smart lightbulbs. This would be my first foray into HomeKit, but I'm surprised that MacOS is missing from this equation.


    P.S. — I sent FEEDBACK to Apple's HomePod-HomeKit Feedback website. Requesting that HomeKit interoperability be rolled out soon for the MacOS. They must be working on it already, it would be dropping the ball if they are not working on this already.

    https://www.apple.com/feedback/homepod.html
     
  20. TrueBlou macrumors demi-god

    TrueBlou

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2014
    Location:
    Scotland
    #20
    It is an odd exclusion, I’ve always just assumed that with iPhone and Apple Watch covering HomeKit and likely to be with you when you’re using your Mac, it hasn’t been a high priority for them.

    That said, now that HomeKit support is software based rather than hardware and they’re making more of a push with it. They have to after all what with the competition. I’ve a funny feeling in my bones we might see it rolled into macOS come WWDC.
     
  21. cynics macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2012
    #21
    I would imagine there is a legitimate reason. If I were to just guess I would say its something related to security and MacOS's more open nature. Easy example is some of Apples own "rules", after a HomeKit accessory firmware update there can't be a way to rollback. Or secure storage requirements of cryptographic keys. Or maybe multi user support on Macs with multiple logins.

    If it was easy they would have done it, I don't see a benefit for them otherwise. Its not like there is an alternative (legit anyway) that would make people buy something from them.

    Its omission just feels like there is some sort of security flaw they can't easily deal with. Which is also why they would remain so tight lip about it. Be nice to talk to an engineer that has designed HomeKit accessories for their speculation since I think that is all we'll ever have....speculation....
     

Share This Page